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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Kabiru Maitama Kura

Drawing on social learning and self-efficacy theories, the purpose of this paper is to examine links among perceived workgroup norms, self-regulatory efficacy, and deviant…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on social learning and self-efficacy theories, the purpose of this paper is to examine links among perceived workgroup norms, self-regulatory efficacy, and deviant workplace behaviours.

Design/methodology/approach

Faculty members from universities located in the northwest geopolitical zone of Nigeria participated. Partial least squares path modelling tested moderation of self-regulatory efficacy on the relationship between perceived workgroup norms and deviant workplace behaviours.

Findings

Findings suggest a positive relationship between perceived descriptive norms and deviant workplace behaviours. A hypothesised effect of perceived injunctive norms on deviant workplace behaviours was not supported. Results also suggest interaction terms representing perceived descriptive norms and self-regulatory efficacy are significant. Similar results regarding moderation of self-regulatory efficacy on the relationship between perceived injunctive norms and deviant workplace behaviours were found. Findings support the view that self-regulatory efficacy overrides predispositions individuals hold to engage in deviant workplace behaviours.

Research limitations/implications

A cross-sectional design did not allow causal inferences, and self-report data associate with common method variance and social-desirability bias.

Practical implications

Individual factors should be considered during selection in Nigerian universities. Moderation of self-regulatory efficacy suggests self-regulation minimises individual engagement in deviant acts. Thus, human resources managers in Nigerian universities should consider self-regulatory efficacy as a selection criterion when hiring academicians. This can be achieved by conducting personality inventory tests to screen those whose values are incompatible.

Originality/value

Although extant research on organisational socialisation demonstrates mix findings regarding the link between perceived workgroup norms and deviant work behaviours, this study tests whether self-regulatory efficacy addresses these inconsistencies.

Details

African Journal of Economic and Management Studies, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-0705

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Article
Publication date: 8 October 2018

Youngseek Kim

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how attitudinal, normative and control beliefs influence scientists’ article sharing through ResearchGate.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how attitudinal, normative and control beliefs influence scientists’ article sharing through ResearchGate.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey method was employed to examine a research model of scientists’ article sharing through ResearchGate. A total of 264 survey responses from biological scientists in the USA were used to evaluate the research model by using partial least square based structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results showed that scientists’ attitudinal beliefs (i.e. perceived relationship, reputation and risk), normative beliefs (i.e. subjective norm, perceived academic culture and community norm of article sharing) and control belief (i.e. perceived ease of use) all significantly affect their attitudes toward article sharing and article sharing intentions through ResearchGate.

Research limitations/implications

The theory of planned behavior (TPB) was used to develop the research model, and the specific research constructs from prior literature were incorporated in the model. The TPB and related research constructs nicely explained biological scientists’ article sharing through ResearchGate.

Practical implications

This study suggests that academic libraries can better promote their scientists’ article sharing through digital platforms such as institutional repositories as well as scholarly social media. This can be achieved by emphasizing its benefits, including potential relationships or collaborations, positive academic reputation and community norms of article sharing, and by decreasing scientists’ concerns about copyright infringements and effort expectancy involved in article sharing.

Originality/value

As one of the initial studies in scientists’ article sharing through ResearchGate, this study provides a holistic picture of how attitudinal, normative and control beliefs all affect scientists’ article sharing through ResearchGate.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 70 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

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Article
Publication date: 13 May 2020

Shih-Tse Edward Wang and Yu-Ting Liao

Although the association between social norms and alcohol dependence has been noted, how social norms cause alcohol dependence remains unclear. This study thus…

Abstract

Purpose

Although the association between social norms and alcohol dependence has been noted, how social norms cause alcohol dependence remains unclear. This study thus investigated how social norms affect the perceived benefits of drinking and alcohol identity, which in turn affect alcohol dependence.

Design/methodology/approach

Convenience sampling was used, and 452 valid questionnaires were collected from alcohol (specifically, beer) consumers over the age of 18; answers were analyzed through structural equation modeling.

Findings

Social norms positively affected the perceived benefits of drinking and alcohol identity; alcohol identity positively affected alcohol dependence; moreover, alcohol identity fully mediated the effects of social norms and the perceived benefits of drinking on alcohol dependence.

Originality/value

How social norms affect alcohol dependence has rarely been studied; thus, the present study has value for integrating the findings in the lines of research on social norms and alcohol dependence. Based on the study results, the authors recommend that policies aimed at discouraging alcohol dependence should focus on mitigating the social pressure to drink and the perceived benefits of drinking as well as labeling others as drinkers.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Shih-Wei Chou and I.H. Hung

The purpose of this paper is to solve the challenges in knowledge outcome (e.g. knowledge contribution, knowledge exploration) improvement at the post-adoption phase in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to solve the challenges in knowledge outcome (e.g. knowledge contribution, knowledge exploration) improvement at the post-adoption phase in the context of e-communities. This study develops a model by integrating dedication-constraint framework and self-presentation theory. The model proposes that knowledge outcomes at the post-adoption phase rely on relationship development between community members, conceptualized as commitment. The authors also hypothesize that members’ perceived online self-presentation quality, theorized as personal control and social influence, serves as the key means to motivate members’ commitment.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used survey instrument to collect data and adopted partial least squares to test the proposed hypotheses.

Findings

The results show that perceived online self-presentation quality positively affects relationship development, which in turn affects continuance intention for knowledge outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

This study expands the dedication-constraint framework by integrating the self-presentation theory. This study contributes new knowledge by proposing a model that delineates the relationship between online self-presentation quality, relationship development, and knowledge outcomes at the post-adoption stage.

Practical implications

This study shows that members’ perceived online self-presentation quality affects both affective commitment and calculative commitment, which in turn affect knowledge outcomes, suggesting the important role of the perceived quality in stimulating a member’s post-adoption reactions.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the research on post-adoption behavior in an e-community context by accounting for the influence of e-community features in self-presentation quality and dedication-constraint mechanisms on post-adoption phenomena.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 29 February 2008

Kamel Rouibah

The purpose of this paper is to study factors that affect adults' acceptance of instant messaging (IM) for social and entertainment purposes in an Arab country

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study factors that affect adults' acceptance of instant messaging (IM) for social and entertainment purposes in an Arab country

Design/methodology/approach

An expanded version of the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) was used to test the impact of four factors (subjective norms, perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness, and perceived enjoyment) and a new construct, curiosity about other people, on the level of IM usage by 191 adults in Kuwait. Survey questions from prior studies were adopted and customized, and the model analyzing using Structural Equation Model with LISREL.

Findings

IM usage is a different type of technology usage than work‐related forms of ICT since it is employed for social and recreational usage. Unlike prior studies that employed TAM in a work‐related setting, perceived usefulness was not a significant antecedent of usage; however, perceived enjoyment, social norms, curiosity about other people, and perceived ease of use were all important antecedents of IM usage.

Research limitations/implications

This study focused on IM usage outside the workplace for social purposes and was restricted to adults within one country (Kuwait). Additional studies across Arab countries are encouraged as well as comparatives studies about IM usage for different contexts (work‐related use of IM from home and IM usage in the workplace).

Practical implications

This study is useful for researchers willing to highlight the factors that motivate users' ICT adoption outside the workplace and for social purposes. It also has implications for managers and software vendors seeking to enhance the adoption of communication‐oriented forms of ICT in the Arab world

Originality/value

The study highlights motives of ICT usage among Arab adults, which has not been widely studied. It also describes Arab culture and shows how certain aspects of culture affect ICT usage.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2021

Bohee Jung, Hanku Kim and Seung Hwan (Shawn) Lee

Although graphic-based emoticons in mobile instant messenger (MIM) services became an important revenue source for their service provider, empirical research investigating…

Abstract

Purpose

Although graphic-based emoticons in mobile instant messenger (MIM) services became an important revenue source for their service provider, empirical research investigating factors influencing graphic-based emoticon purchase from the consumer's perspective is insufficient. The authors explore how user's achieved belongingness (acceptance or rejection) affects graphic based emoticon usage motivations and its purchase intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

A structural model is used to examine the relationship among individual's overall achieved belongingness, motivation factors of graphic-based emoticon usage in MIM such as perceived usefulness, perceived enjoyment, perceived enjoyment for others, social norm and emoticon purchase intentions. The authors collected and analyzed survey data of 279 Korean KakaoTalk users.

Findings

The analysis shows that perceived acceptance/inclusion positively impacts perceived usefulness, enjoyment and enjoyment of others in graphic-based emoticon usage. Meanwhile, perceived rejection/exclusion positively impacts perceived enjoyment and enjoyment of others but negatively influences perceived social norms. Moreover, social norms and perceived enjoyment directly affect graphic-based emoticon purchase intentions. The authors also find that perceived enjoyment of others and perceived social norms in a serial causal order mediate the relationship between perceived acceptance/inclusion (and rejection/exclusion) and emoticon purchase intentions.

Research limitations/implications

Additional research including users from other demographic groups, such as other age groups, is required to generalize our findings and to increase external validity.

Originality/value

Unique implications related to the role of user's achieved belongingness and perceived enjoyment of others in graphic-based emoticon usage in purchase intentions are found.

Peer review

The peer review history for this article is available at: https://publons.com/publon/ 10.1108/OIR-02-2020-0036

Details

Online Information Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2020

Hwee-Joo Kam, Thomas Mattson and Dan J. Kim

This study argues that the effect of perceived organizational culture on the formation of security-related subjective norms and the level of compliance pressure will vary…

Abstract

Purpose

This study argues that the effect of perceived organizational culture on the formation of security-related subjective norms and the level of compliance pressure will vary based on how the employees perceive their organization's cultural values. These perceptions reflect on the assumptions and principles that organizations use to guide their security-related behaviors. To make these arguments, we adopt the competing values model (CVM), which is a model used to understand the range of organizational values and resulting cultural archetypes.

Design/methodology/approach

This study conducted a survey of working professionals in the banking and higher education industries and used partial least squares (PLS)-structural equation model (SEM) to analyze the data. In a series of post hoc analyses, we ran a set of multi-group analyses to compare the perceived organizational cultural effects between the working professionals in both industries.

Findings

Our study reveals that perceived organizational cultures in favor of stability and control promoted more positive security-related behaviors. However, the different effects were more pronounced when comparing the effects between the working professionals in both industries.

Originality/value

This study is one of the few that examines which cultural archetypes are more effective at fostering positive security behaviors. These findings suggest that we should be cautious about generalizing the effects of organizational culture on security-related actions across different contexts and industries.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 3 November 2020

Hwijin Jeon Baldick and SooCheong (Shawn) Jang

This study aims to examine the motivating factors that influence intentions to book shared rooms through Airbnb as well as the moderating effects of past experience and gender.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the motivating factors that influence intentions to book shared rooms through Airbnb as well as the moderating effects of past experience and gender.

Design/methodology/approach

This study analyzed data from 214 leisure travelers who had previously stayed in shared rooms through Airbnb and 207 participants who had not yet experienced Airbnb. A covariance-based structural equation modeling (CB-SEM) technique was performed to test the significance of attitude, subjective norms, extroverted personality, perceived risk and perceived price. Furthermore, the study explored past experience and gender as moderators.

Findings

The results suggest that attitude, subjective norms and perceived risk significantly impacted intentions to book shared rooms through Airbnb. However, perceived price was not a significant determinant. In addition, this study verified that past experience and gender moderated the relationship between important referents and attitude/booking intentions.

Practical implications

This study gives Airbnb hosts a better understanding of travelers who choose Airbnb’s shared rooms. In addition, hosts who offer shared rooms can implement marketing strategies and complementary activities to not only reduce the risk of booking shared rooms but also attract more travelers.

Originality/value

While previous studies examined Airbnb as one homogeneous type of accommodation, this study focused on Airbnb’s shared rooms. A clearer understanding of consumers who intend to book Airbnb’s shared rooms will enable hosts to develop effective marketing strategies.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 32 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2015

Ramasamy Murugesan and Rathinam Jayavelu

The purpose of this study is to test the impact of entrepreneurship education on business, engineering and arts and science students using the theory of planned behaviour…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to test the impact of entrepreneurship education on business, engineering and arts and science students using the theory of planned behaviour. The study adopted a pre-test–post-test (time 1, t1 and time 2, t2) to measure the change of attitudes and intentions over a period of six months. The participants who took entrepreneurship as a compulsory or elective course within their curriculum are 450 in total. To measure attitude, the subjective norm and perceived behavioural control, the study adopted a measure proposed by Kolvereid (1996b). For the intention to become self-employed, the study adopted a three-item measure of career intention, proposed by Kolvereid (1996b), which captures the intention of an individual to start a business. The results showed that the post-programme mean values of subjective norm, attitude towards self-employment, perceived behavioural control and intention towards self-employment increased in relation to the pre-programme ones. But the mean difference value in all four variables is higher for business students when compared to the other two student groups. Also, t-tests indicated no significant differences between respondents and “incomplete” non-respondents (students who filled the t1 questionnaire but failed to respond at t2).

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a pre-test–post-test (time 1, t1 and time 2, t2) to measure the change of attitudes and intentions over a period of six months – one semester. A convenient sample technique has been used. The participants who took entrepreneurship as a compulsory or elective course within their curriculum are 450 in total – 100 (Bharathidasan University, Trichy) from business, 100 (National Institute of Technology, Trichy) from engineering and 250 (Bharathidasan University, Trichy) from art and science). The total 250 arts and science students were selected from four reputed art and science colleges in India where entrepreneurship course is offered either as compulsory or elective course, and due share of 60 was given to each college where the total number of students in the final year was 1,000 to 1,500 in each college. The 100 engineering students were selected from one reputed engineering college where the total number of final year students was 750. Finally, 100 business students were selected from two reputed business schools where the number of final year students was 600. All the students from arts and science and engineering were soon-to-graduate undergraduates and business students were soon-to-graduate postgraduates. It was clearly explained to the surveyed students that the questionnaires were for research purposes only, participation was voluntary and their views would not affect their grades. Both time 1 (t1) and time 2 (t2) questionnaires were reviewed by three academics and five non-participating students to ensure clarity of wording and face validity of the constructs.

Findings

The overall response rate was 55.3 per cent. The mean and standard deviation of variables, attitude towards self-employment, subjective norm, perceived behavioural control and intention towards self-employment for the samples of business students, engineering students and arts and science students are presented in . To test the hypothesis, the present study used the following tests: Correlation (Tables III-V) and regression (Table VI) to test the relationship between attitudes and intention at t1 and t2. To test the effect of the programme on the change of attitudes and intentions, the current study used one-way ANOVA on the difference scores (for sample of business, engineering and arts and science) with the group membership (programme) as the independent variable. The “difference scores” method is preferable to split-plot repeated measures ANOVA for pre-test–post-test designs, because it gives equivalent results in a simpler and less confusing way (Girden, 1992). No significant violations of the assumptions for t-test, repeated measured ANOVA and regression were identified. Specifically, the common problem of multicollinearity was not evident for all the three majors of students, as the correlations between independent variables were moderate and the tolerance values were all higher than 0.70 for business group, 0.72 for engineering group and 0.73 for arts and science group.

Research limitations/implications

The study aimed to address the attitudes and intentions among business, engineering students and art and science students, but not actual behaviour, and therefore, the study echoes the suggestion that longitudinal studies following the subjects for years after graduation are the only way to prove with accuracy the intention–behaviour link (Kolvereid, 1996b). The study is a comparative study on the effect of entrepreneurship education through the Azjen’s theory of planned behaviour on the scores of variable attitudes towards self-employment, subjective norms, perceived behavioural control and intention towards self-employment and has not made any attempt to find out the causes for such scores.

Originality/value

Using the theory of planned behaviour, the study tested the impact of entrepreneurship education on business, engineering and arts and science students. The study adopted a pre-test–post-test (time 1, t1 and time 2, t2) to measure the change of attitudes and intentions over a period of six months. The participants who took entrepreneurship as a compulsory or elective course within their curriculum are in total 450. To measure attitude, the subjective norm and perceived behavioural control, the study adopted a measure proposed by Kolvereid (1996b). For the intention of becoming self-employed, the study adopted a three-item measure of career intention, proposed by Kolvereid (1996b), which captures the intention of an individual to start a business. The results showed that the post-programme mean values of subjective norm, attitude towards self-employment, perceived behavioural control and intention towards self-employment increased in relation to the pre-programme ones. But the mean difference value in all four variables is higher for business students when compared to the other two student groups.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4604

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Article
Publication date: 30 May 2019

Amjad A. Abu-Elsamen, Mamoun N. Akroush, Nermeen A. Asfour and Hana Al Jabali

This paper aims to examine contextual factors affecting intention to purchase energy-saving products (ESPs), via a research model integrating environmental awareness…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine contextual factors affecting intention to purchase energy-saving products (ESPs), via a research model integrating environmental awareness, perceived performance risk and perceived financial risk with the theory of reasoned action (TRA).

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 474 targeted Jordanian householders completed a structured survey, providing data for exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses and for structural path analysis to test the research model and hypotheses.

Findings

Attitude most strongly predicts purchase intention. Environmental awareness positively influences subjective norms and reduces perceived performance and financial risks, which are related to purchase intention.

Research limitations/implications

This research examines perceived performance and financial risks. Others including social and physical risks have research potential. Future research on international marketing strategy and cross-cultural consumer behavior could compare Jordan with its oil-producing neighbors.

Practical implications

Environmental awareness affects ESP purchase intention. Marketing strategy should focus on reducing perceived functional and financial risks while enhancing subjective norms by encouraging positive word of mouth.

Social implications

The findings enhance environmental sustainability by indicating ways of reducing energy consumption and increasing the usage of environmentally friendly products. The study addresses behavioral and social aspects of green products, whereas most ESP suppliers focus on technology.

Originality/value

The study’s major theoretical contribution is incorporating perceived risk and environmental awareness into the TRA to better understand intention to purchase ESPs. Empirically, it conceptualizes and tests an integrated model of determinants of attitudes and intentions with new insights from an emerging market.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

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