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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1988

Claire P. Bolfing

Marketers must be aware that consumers do not evaluate all products in the same way. Even brands that are perceived as very similar overall are often selectively…

1783

Abstract

Marketers must be aware that consumers do not evaluate all products in the same way. Even brands that are perceived as very similar overall are often selectively evaluated. Consumer product involvement, or concern with the actual purchase or use of the product, affects these selective perception processes in several ways. Implications for market segmentation, product differentiation, and communication strategies are discussed.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Shwu‐Ing Wu

States that the level of consumer involvement in a product category is a major variable relevant to advertising strategy. Suggests product category is often segmented by…

7431

Abstract

States that the level of consumer involvement in a product category is a major variable relevant to advertising strategy. Suggests product category is often segmented by the level of consumer involvement; however, consumers are rarely segmented. Points out that different involvement clusters have different responses to advertising effectiveness for the same product. Presents a case study segmenting a market using the consumer involvement degree, exploring the characteristics in order to determine the relationship between advertising effectiveness and the level of consumer involvement. Shows results suggesting that a high degree of consumer involvement directed a high advertising effect and is therefore an important indication for advertising strategy.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-728-5

Book part
Publication date: 21 December 2010

Timothy Heinze

Purpose – To better understand the general marketing sensitivities of Generation Y and the manner in which Congruency Theory and the Elaboration Likelihood Model (ELM) may…

Abstract

Purpose – To better understand the general marketing sensitivities of Generation Y and the manner in which Congruency Theory and the Elaboration Likelihood Model (ELM) may apply.

Design/methodology/approach – A quantitative two-factor (peripheral cue congruency and relative product involvement) between-subjects design was used to determine the attitudinal impact associated with the use of congruous peripheral cues in high- and low-involvement product situations.

Findings – Generation Y's attitudinal responses to peripheral cues both align with and vary from the general predictions of the ELM. Relative product involvement is more important than peripheral cue congruency in the formation of attitudes toward an advertisement.

Originality/value – Generation Y is a powerful social and economic consumer group whose attitudinal responses to marketing appeals have not been extensively studied. The current study furthers understanding within this important arena.

Research implications/limitations – The use of congruent peripheral cues is not sufficient to generate positive attitudes in both high- and low-involvement product scenarios. Effective marketing must move beyond cue congruency to include an involved “lifestyle fit” that will effectively generate positive attitudes. Limitations include the sole review of print advertisements and a sole reliance on college-attending members of Generation Y. Future research should examine the impact of congruency on advertisements whose strategic intent focuses on awareness or action rather than on mere attitude change.

Details

Research in Consumer Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-444-4

Article
Publication date: 14 June 2022

Jun Zhang and Jingwen Wang

This study investigates how reward type (single vs. plural), reward characteristic (utilitarian vs. hedonic) and product involvement (high vs. low) affect the design of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates how reward type (single vs. plural), reward characteristic (utilitarian vs. hedonic) and product involvement (high vs. low) affect the design of reward programs.

Design/methodology/approach

A 2 ✕ 2 ✕ 2 fractional factorial experimental design is constructed to explore the main factors influencing the effectiveness of reward programs on a sample of 436 Chinese customers.

Findings

The results indicate that reward type is an important determinant of customers' preference toward reward programs. Plural rewards are preferable to a single reward when the alternatives provide the same benefits, particularly in the low level of product involvement. In the high level of product involvement, reward characteristic has a significant effect on customers' preference. Hedonic rewards are more effective in building a program's value than utilitarian rewards. Moreover, reward characteristic interacts with reward type, positively impacting customers' preference toward reward programs.

Originality/value

This study suggests that managers should consider the effects of reward type, reward characteristic and product involvement to formulate attractive reward programs for sustainable business in China.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 4 April 2022

Johan Bruwer and Justin Cohen

Craft beer (CB) has gained prominence in the on-premise trade in the USA, which has become the world’s largest market for CB. Academically based research in the…

Abstract

Purpose

Craft beer (CB) has gained prominence in the on-premise trade in the USA, which has become the world’s largest market for CB. Academically based research in the hospitality domain examining consumer behavioral psychology-based constructs in the situational consumption context of restaurants has, however, not kept pace with market reality. This study aims to examine how product involvement, knowledge, opinion leadership-seeking, risk perception, information processing and their interactions affect consumption of CB by consumers in the situational context of restaurants in the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

A national sample of 697 consumers from across the USA covering all categories of restaurants, including bars, pubs and brewpubs, informs the development of a structural equation model (SEM) of the motivational process to examine these effects. In the process, the authors validate latent construct measurement scales specific to CB consumption in the restaurant environment.

Findings

The results support main hypotheses confirming the existence of distinct motivational relationships, thus explicating the processes by which consumers’ CB product involvement, product knowledge, opinion leadership-seeking and risk perception are activated, influence one another and their subsequent information processing-related outcomes. The findings also confirm the unstable nature of the situational involvement construct, the stability of enduring involvement and the pivotal role of psychological risk on opinion leadership and opinion seeking as well as on other antecedents. As far as the interaction effects between the constructs are concerned, the authors confirm five mediating effects and one moderating effect.

Practical implications

Strategies should be developed by hospitality managers to identify consumers with higher enduring involvement with CB. Strategies should also be implemented that mitigate psychological, social and functional risk. The insights into the motivational relationships pertaining to CB consumption in restaurants should be integrated into drinks menu design and be considered in how service staff are trained.

Originality/value

This research provides nuanced insights from a motivational perspective of consumers in the situational context of restaurants from a holistic and consumer-centric behavioral psychology perspective providing deepened insights of focal behavioral psychology constructs and their roles in the hospitality domain.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 34 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 January 2020

Jian Mou, Wenlong Zhu and Morad Benyoucef

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of product description and involvement on purchase intention in a cross-border e-commerce (CBEC) setting from a…

2878

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of product description and involvement on purchase intention in a cross-border e-commerce (CBEC) setting from a psychological perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

This study proposes a research model of purchase intention in CBEC based on the involvement theory and commitment-involvement theory. The research model was tested using the covariance-based structural equation modeling technique. Data were collected from consumers on a popular CBEC platform in China.

Findings

A high-quality product description has no significant positive effect on purchase intention, but it has significant positive effects on product cognitive involvement, product affective involvement, platform enduring involvement and platform situational involvement. In addition, product affective involvement, platform enduring involvement and platform situational involvement all have significant positive effect on purchase intention, but this effect is not significant in the relationship between product cognitive involvement and purchase intention.

Practical implications

This study calls for sellers to optimize product descriptions on CBEC platforms in order to attract more buyers and generate more profits.

Originality/value

This study integrates two theories of involvement into the research model in the CBEC context. Based on this model, the authors analyzed how product description affects purchase intention under the joint influence of two involvement factors.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 120 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 October 2019

Rohail Ashraf, Noel Albert, Dwight Merunka and Muhammad Asif Khan

Increasing consumer skepticism of corporate behavior has led companies to actively manage and advertise their corporate brands. However, it remains unclear how receptive…

Abstract

Purpose

Increasing consumer skepticism of corporate behavior has led companies to actively manage and advertise their corporate brands. However, it remains unclear how receptive consumers across different markets are to such efforts. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate differences and similarities between corporate and product advertising by examining consumer ad involvement (AI) levels (a motivational state activated by the personal relevance of stimuli) and its antecedents and consequences for these ad types across two markets with varying degrees of economic development.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a 2 (ad type: corporate vs product) × 2 (market type: developed vs emerging) between-subject experimental design, the study was conducted in two markets with varying degrees of economic development, specifically, the USA (n=285) and Pakistan (n=311).

Findings

Results show that consumer involvement with corporate ads varies for developed (USA: high) and emerging (Pakistan: low) markets but that it remains the same for product ads across markets. Developed market consumers tend to be as involved with corporate ads as they are with product ads, whereas emerging market consumers are more involved with product ads than with corporate ads. Aside from differences in involvement levels, the findings demonstrate substantial similarities in the antecedents and consequences of consumer involvement for both ad (corporate vs product) and market (developed vs emerging) types.

Practical implications

With advertising and communication campaigns increasingly being standardized across different markets, this study demonstrates that corporate messages do not function similar as product messages across markets. For effective corporate campaigns, ad designs should fit with the motivation levels of the target consumers across markets.

Originality/value

This study demonstrates the differences and similarities between corporate and product AI across a developed and an emerging market.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 November 2007

Christina Sichtmann and Susanne Stingel

Limit conjoint analysis (LCA) and Vickrey auctions (VA) are methods for measuring willingness‐to‐pay (WTP) currently under discussion. However, there are hardly any…

1927

Abstract

Purpose

Limit conjoint analysis (LCA) and Vickrey auctions (VA) are methods for measuring willingness‐to‐pay (WTP) currently under discussion. However, there are hardly any studies comparing the approaches in terms of their applicability and validity. This paper aims to analyze the differences in WTP elicited by the two methods and their validity in high and low involvement situations.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were obtained from 179 online interviews conducted in Germany. Differences in the WTPs elicited were analyzed with a Wilcoxon Signed Ranks Test. For the validation part, a χ2 test of independence was used.

Findings

The results indicate differences depending on the method applied and the involvement situation. Additionally, the study indicates that for low involvement products VA performs better while for high involvement situations the results are not as clear. In terms of validity, both methods do not show satisfactory results.

Research limitations/implications

In order to generalize the findings further WTP comparisons should be done with other survey objects, samples and measurement approaches. The contribution of this paper is to show that there are significant differences in WTP measurement depending on the method used and the involvement of consumers.

Practical implications

Marketing researchers and practitioners are advised to pay special attention to the choice of method when measuring the WTP for a specific product. VA should be preferred in low involvement situations. LCA should not be used in situations where consumers are not interested in the product.

Originality/value

The study presented is the first paper to tackle the issue of influencing factors of WTP measurement systematically.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 41 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 28 February 2019

Enav Friedmann and Oded Lowengart

This paper aims to address the role of product involvement in the brand preference formation of men and women. Product involvement can be defined as a consumer’s…

1583

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to address the role of product involvement in the brand preference formation of men and women. Product involvement can be defined as a consumer’s motivation for product purchase that affects their information processing strategies when forming a brand preference (e.g. more automatic at low levels vs more deliberative at high levels). Given that gender differences are found to be context-dependent, it was expected that, when forming a single brand preference, men would emphasize instrumental aspects (functional and socially conspicuous utilities) and women the experiential utility of the brand only with high-involvement-level products.

Design/methodology/approach

A descriptive survey (n = 459) using structural equation modeling (SEM) analysis was used following an online experiment where involvement level was manipulated (n = 255) to validate the results.

Findings

Stereotypical gender differences appeared at high, but not low-involvement levels. Theoretically, these findings question the evolutionary basis of gender differences, as differences were not consistent at both levels.

Practical implications

The findings raise questions about the efficacy of segmenting by gender when aiming to increase brand preference of low-involvement products, whereas stereotypical targeting seem to be effective for increasing preference for high-involvement ones.

Originality/value

For the first time, the role of product involvement and gender was examined in brand preference formation. This can theoretically clarify whether gender differences are consistent or dependent on the level of involvement. This information can help in designing efficient marketing strategies for products with different involvement levels.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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