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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2018

Yanxia Wang, Chih-Chieh Chen, Luo Lu, Robert Eisenberger and Patricia Fosh

The purpose of this paper is to promote a wider understanding of the importance of distinguishing between presenteeism behavior and its motivation and between the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to promote a wider understanding of the importance of distinguishing between presenteeism behavior and its motivation and between the avoidance and approach dimensions of motivation, and to rectify the neglect of presenteeism’s antecedents (in particular, situational ones). It develops a theoretical model that explains how situational antecedents affect presenteeism – conventionally defined as attending work while ill.

Design/methodology/approach

An ordinary least-squares regression-based path analysis is employed to analyze the findings of a sample of 277 employees in service organizations in southwestern China.

Findings

Findings demonstrate that the situational factor, leader–member exchange (LMX), is positively related to the approach dimension of presenteeism motivation and that of workload moderates the positive link between presenteeism motivation and behavior, such that employees who experience higher workload more frequently display presenteeism behavior.

Practical implications

Findings suggest that managers should be prudent when developing relationships with their subordinates and consider the ways in which they may most effectively encourage employees to support their organization.

Originality/value

This is the first study to consider LMX and workload as situational antecedents of presenteeism motivation and behavior.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 33 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 22 August 2017

Luo Lu and Hsueh-Liang Fan

Using interpersonal relationship development as a metaphor for team process, the purpose of this paper is to explore critical psychological mechanisms transforming team…

Abstract

Purpose

Using interpersonal relationship development as a metaphor for team process, the purpose of this paper is to explore critical psychological mechanisms transforming team inputs into successful work outcomes, at the individual level.

Design/methodology/approach

The participants in this study were full-time employees in Taiwan. The authors employed a two-phase design to examine the developmental aspect of, and the enhancer for the team process. Paper-based questionnaires were used to collect data. All the research constructs were assessed at the individual level, thus analysis was conducted at the same level.

Findings

The results from 338 Taiwanese employees revealed that perceived psychological similarity (i.e. value and attitudinal congruence, a team input) led to favorable work outcomes (i.e. job satisfaction and team performance) through the linking mechanism of team cohesion. Furthermore, team members’ trait emotional intelligence (EI) amplified the positive relationship between psychological similarity and team cohesion.

Practical implications

First, managers should purposefully assemble employees with similar values and interests to work together, giving the team a good start with the like minds. Second, the results indicated that trait EI as a key personal resource enhances the positive relationship between psychological similarity and team cohesion. Workplace learning interventions should be implemented to improve employees’ emotion management skills.

Originality/value

Adopting the interpersonal relationship development perspective to study team process, the findings have confirmed the important roles of perceived psychological similarity among members and individual’s EI for team functioning. The authors’ endeavor has demonstrated the value of solid theoretical basis and the benefit of an individual-level analysis in delineating the mediating processes that explain why certain inputs affect team effectiveness and viability.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

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Abstract

Details

The Future Of Global Organizing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-422-5

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Book part
Publication date: 5 December 2018

Han Shen, Xinge Li and Yangfan Zhang

With the development of tourism industry, online travel agencies (OTA) have gradually become an important channel for tourism product supplies and sales. Some OTAs provide…

Abstract

With the development of tourism industry, online travel agencies (OTA) have gradually become an important channel for tourism product supplies and sales. Some OTAs provide consumers with a platform for tourism guidance and online travel sharing. They not only satisfy some tourists’ desire to share their experiences but also provide reference for more consumers to choose travel products. This process is the process of value co-creation by customers and online travel companies. This study is conducted under DART theory, a theoretical framework of value co-creation composed of four dimensions, namely dialog, access, risk-assessment, and transparency. Brand equity is divided into four aspects: brand loyalty, brand awareness, customer perceived value, and brand image. This study uses the structural equation model to investigate the impact of customer value co-creation behavior on brand equity of online travel enterprises and interprets the process and mechanism of customer value co-creation behaviors for online travel business brand equity, which provides more efficient strategies and methods for platform interaction and value co-creation.

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Article
Publication date: 11 March 2019

Anders Pehrsson

Business relatedness is important in international diversification because it enables a firm’s transfer of resources to business units operating in foreign markets. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Business relatedness is important in international diversification because it enables a firm’s transfer of resources to business units operating in foreign markets. The purpose of this paper is to develop a conceptual model based on a review of the major contributions of studies regarding the relatedness of subsidiaries, joint ventures or any other foreign unit.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper examines theory bases, the relatedness construct, data issues and the key achievements of previous studies. Drawing on organizational learning, transaction costs economics and industrial organization, a conceptual model and propositions are developed that intend to close important research gaps.

Findings

The model includes competitive strategy as a mediator of the effects of relatedness on foreign unit performance, type of foreign unit – that is, a wholly owned unit or joint venture – as a moderator; and competition barriers as a moderator.

Research limitations/implications

In future research, the propositions need to be transformed into testable hypotheses. It is recommended to treat relatedness as a multidimensional concept.

Practical implications

A firm is primarily advised to evaluate how its relatedness with foreign units enables knowledge transfer. A foreign cost leadership strategy benefits from product relatedness, while a differentiation strategy calls for resource relatedness.

Originality/value

The proposed model is unique as it includes an actionable component that mediates the effects of relatedness on international performance, i.e. competitive strategy, and concerns both wholly owned foreign units and international joint ventures.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

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Article
Publication date: 27 September 2018

Xuequn Cheng and Xiao Mei Zuo

The purpose of this paper is to study the electrochemical behavior of 690 alloy with corrosion products in simulated pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary water environment.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the electrochemical behavior of 690 alloy with corrosion products in simulated pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary water environment.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper opted for a laboratory study using simulation of high temperature and high pressure environment immersion testing. The electrochemical behavior was studied by potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, scanning Kelvin probe microscopy (SKP). Moreover, the corrosion products were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

Findings

The results demonstrated that the particle majority in the 690 alloy corrosion products subsequent to high temperature and high pressure immersion testing were mainly oxides of Fe and Ni, which protected the matrix. As the immersion testing duration increased, the corrosion potential of the 690 alloy apparently increased, and the corrosion current density de'creased, while the corrosion resistance Rf increased gradually along with the density. The SKP demonstrated that the EKP increased by nearly 400 mV from −0.42 to −0.03 V following the immersion testing, indicating that the corrosion product film played an apparent protective role on the substrate.

Originality/value

This paper provides a theoretical basis for the corrosion behavior and inhibition mechanism of 690 alloy in PWR primary water environment.

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 65 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

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Article
Publication date: 18 December 2018

Ying Zhang, Etieno Enang and Harry Sminia

Mergers and acquisitions being done by emerging market multinational corporations (EMNCs) increasingly attract scholarly attention. However, conclusions concerning the…

Abstract

Purpose

Mergers and acquisitions being done by emerging market multinational corporations (EMNCs) increasingly attract scholarly attention. However, conclusions concerning the nature and the theoretical underpinnings of EMNCs’ post-acquisition integration vary significantly, calling for an assessment of the state of affairs in this field. This paper aims to critically review the extant studies on EMNCs’ post-acquisition integration and to make a comparison with advanced economy multinational corporations’ (AMNCs’) post-acquisition integration, in order to formulate an agenda for future research.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of papers from 21 leading journals in the fields of international business, management, human resource management and strategy published between 1991 and March 2018 are included in the literature review. Qualitative content analysis was conducted.

Findings

The topics are clustered into the four themes of strategies and processes, influencing factors, acquisition performance and antecedents of post-acquisition integration of EMNCs. The literature on EMNCs and AMNCs converges with regard to the broad methodological and theoretical approaches that have been adopted. Yet, EMNCs and AMNCs diverge on the detailed strategies and behavioral patterns of post-acquisition integration, mostly as a consequence of country of origin factors.

Originality/value

The paper identifies a number of deficiencies within existing research and suggests how they can be addressed in future research. By doing so, the paper deepens the argumentation of the third camp in the “Goldilocks debate” (Cuervo-Cazurra, 2012) arguing that the phenomenon of post-acquisition of EMNCs is “just right” for theory extension and development.

Details

Multinational Business Review, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2003

Luo Lu, Cary L. Cooper, Shu‐Fang Kao and Yun Zhou

Towards the end of the twentieth century, the world has witnessed an amazing economic take‐off in the East Asia, especially within the territory of so‐called “Greater…

Abstract

Towards the end of the twentieth century, the world has witnessed an amazing economic take‐off in the East Asia, especially within the territory of so‐called “Greater China”, encompassing the PRC and Taiwan. Against this economic and cultural background, this study surveyed 258 and 189 employees respectively in Taiwan, and the PRC (Shanghai), to examine generalizability of a generic work‐stress model to the Chinese societies. It further examined the sub‐cultural differences in the work‐stress processes, by drawing contrast of the PRC and Taiwan. In addition, roles of emic constructs of Chinese primary and secondary control beliefs were also examined. Results showed that the generic work‐stress model could be reasonably applied to Chinese urban work contexts in the PRC and Taiwan. Work stress related as expected to strain effects. At a more refined sub‐cultural level, it was found that different sources of work stress became salient contributors to strain outcomes in the PRC and Taiwan. These differences reflect the diverse political, social, and economic characteristics of the two Chinese societies. More importantly, emic constructs of Chinese control beliefs were found to have rather consistent direct effects on strain outcomes. However, indirect (moderating) effects of control beliefs were not strong and inconsistent.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 21 September 2015

Michael W. Hansen and Wencke Gwozdz

The purpose of this paper is to examine the evolution in subsidiary performance and the factors influencing this performance based on a unique database of approximately…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the evolution in subsidiary performance and the factors influencing this performance based on a unique database of approximately 800 multi-national company (MNC) subsidiaries in developing countries. Developed-country multi-national companies (MNCs) are increasingly establishing subsidiaries in developing countries. The potential gains are high; however, so are the risks. While the issue of subsidiary performance should be at the heart of any international business (IB) enquiry into MNC activity in developing countries, surprisingly little research has examined this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a comprehensive literature review of the IB performance literature, it is hypothesized that subsidiary performance essentially is shaped by five clusters of factors: location, industry, MNC capabilities, subsidiary role and entry strategy. These factors’ ability to explain variance in subsidiary performance is tested through a multiple regression analysis.

Findings

MNC subsidiary performance in developing countries has improved enormously in recent decades. Especially, MNC capability and subsidiary role-related factors appear to explain variance in performance, while location factors appear to have less explanatory power. This suggests that strong MNC capabilities and organization can make MNCs succeed regardless of location.

Practical implications

The key preparatory work for MNCs contemplating entry into developing countries is to carefully scrutinize internal capabilities and organization.

Originality/value

The paper presents a model for explaining variation in subsidiary performance in developing countries specifically. The paper offers unique empirical insights into the state and drivers of subsidiary performance in developing countries.

Details

The Multinational Business Review, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

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Book part
Publication date: 16 August 2014

Anna Kaunonen

Three types of industrial buyer-seller relational process models are available: joining theory, stage theory, and state theory. However, historically, these models have…

Abstract

Three types of industrial buyer-seller relational process models are available: joining theory, stage theory, and state theory. However, historically, these models have developed based on the knowledge and cultural context of the Western world. Several researchers note that national culture may have an impact on international industrial buyer-seller relationships. Including culture in the models is highly important, especially as the business environment is increasingly more global and different countries have different business cultures. The goal of this paper is to define the most suitable industrial buyer-seller relational process models for describing relationships in various contexts. The paper includes a through literature review and a single case study in order to reach this objective. A new state theory model evolved during the research. It consists of two beginning states: searching and starting; four purely middles states: constant/static, decline, growth, and troubled; and a purely end state: termination. The state of dormant/inert is both a middle state and an end state, that is, when the relational actors are not in contact does not mean that the relationship has ended, but instead, for example, new legislation may have been implemented, which requires the actors to evaluate their relationship and its future. A relationship goes through the two beginning states in the order mentioned above, but after that, any state may occur.

Details

Advances in Business Marketing & Purchasing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-858-7

Keywords

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