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Article
Publication date: 16 January 2007

Christian Stoy, Frank Dreier and Hans‐Rudolf Schalcher

Planning the construction duration is an important consideration in any construction project. Indicators that permit an early forecast of the duration provide the basis…

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1589

Abstract

Purpose

Planning the construction duration is an important consideration in any construction project. Indicators that permit an early forecast of the duration provide the basis for such planning. To date, such a basis has been lacking in the German‐speaking area. This paper aims to discuss this matter.

Design/methodology/approach

Indicators are identified that enable a forecast of the construction duration. In addition, a simple regression model is provided to assist in selecting construction speed indicators. This empirical analysis relies on the data, collected on a uniform basis, from 115 German residential buildings.

Findings

Project size (measured in m2 gross external floor area) and project standard (measured in € building construction cost/m2 gross external floor area) are found to be significant drivers of construction speed. It appears that project size, in contrast to the project standard, is positively correlated with construction speed.

Originality/value

An expansion of the data pool is required for more extensive study. On the one hand, this means including relevant drivers that have only been insufficiently considered to date, such as project complexity, project environment, management‐related attributes. On the other hand, the data pool must also be expanded to include other types of use.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 5 July 2011

Bon‐Gang Hwang and Zong Bao Yeo

Increased disposal costs and reduction in number of landfills have created a need for implementing effective waste management in the construction industry. As every…

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4881

Abstract

Purpose

Increased disposal costs and reduction in number of landfills have created a need for implementing effective waste management in the construction industry. As every construction project is unique in its way of development, benefits from the waste management may also differ from project to project and thus project characteristics should be taken into consideration when implementing the strategy. This study seeks to investigate how different project characteristics affect perception on benefits, from construction waste management, based on the survey results from 66 industry experts.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review was conducted to gather information on project characteristics and its classification, construction waste management, waste management plan and its benefits. Subsequently, a set of questions was formulated to gain insight and opinion on the selection of project characteristics and particular benefits of construction waste management. A set of questions pertaining to different project characteristics linked with benefits of waste management was sent to each of the personnel for their views.

Findings

The results of this study establishes that the key materials used in projects, project size in terms of total installed costs, and project type have perceptual impacts on benefits from construction waste management.

Originality/value

Understanding how project characteristics will affect the benefits can help the construction industry to identify projects to which the waste management should first be applied, maximizing its benefits.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 23 January 2009

Helen Lingard, Nick Blismas, Tracy Cooke and Helen Cooper

Clients of the construction industry, an important segment of the project management (PM) discipline, can make an important contribution to the occupational health and…

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1203

Abstract

Purpose

Clients of the construction industry, an important segment of the project management (PM) discipline, can make an important contribution to the occupational health and safety (OHS) performance of the construction projects they procure. This practice note aims to describe an initiative of the Office of the Federal Safety Commissioner in Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

A model client framework was developed to assist Australian Government agencies to embed OHS into their procurement and PM practices.

Findings

The model client framework establishes principles for the management of OHS in construction projects and establishes processes for client involvement in OHS through the planning, design and procurement, construction and completion stages of construction projects. Within each project stage, key management actions are established for Australian Government agencies.

Practical implications

The model client framework will enable Australian Government agencies to operate in a consistent framework and on a similar footing, with respect to the management of OHS in their construction projects. This practice note describes the key components of the framework.

Originality/value

The model client framework is the first comprehensive set of tools and resources to support construction clients to integrate OHS into their procurement and PM processes. The life‐cycle approach ensures that OHS information is transferred throughout the construction supply chain from the client, through the designer, constructor and ultimately to the end‐user. The Framework shows how the integration of OHS into all aspects of project decision making (led by the client) can significantly improve the OHS performance of construction projects.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

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Article
Publication date: 27 February 2009

S. Tai, Y. Wang and C.J. Anumba

The purpose of this paper is to show how effective project team communications is one of the major challenges to a construction project's success. The success of…

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2915

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show how effective project team communications is one of the major challenges to a construction project's success. The success of large‐scale construction projects is critical to Chinese economy. The purposes of the research are to grasp the current status of communications in large‐scale construction projects in China and lay a basis for further research on project communications.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted by postal questionnaire and telephone.

Findings

Through analyzing the data obtained from the survey, the communication problems in large‐scale construction projects in China are exposed. The roots of the problems are summarized as lack of good communication mechanism, weak organizational structures of construction teams, lack of uniform standards for construction information, and lack of support for advanced communication technologies.

Originality/value

The paper presents the directions for further research to improve communications in large‐scale construction projects in China.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 24 August 2010

Ismail Rahmat and Azlan Shah Ali

The paper's aim is to establish the relationships between the formalisation of construction firms on the level of coordination and effectiveness of refurbishment projects.

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1138

Abstract

Purpose

The paper's aim is to establish the relationships between the formalisation of construction firms on the level of coordination and effectiveness of refurbishment projects.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach takes the form of a literature review of published journals and textbooks, a postal questionnaire survey with managing directors, project managers and contract managers. About 94 construction companies were selected for the postal questionnaire survey. In total, 54 (57 percent) of returned questionnaires were considered to be useful for statistical analysis.

Findings

Highly formalised construction firms require higher level of coordination than lowly formalised construction firms. In highly formalised construction firms, the participants managing refurbishment projects tend to circumvent formalisation by having more informal interactions, which contradicts the needs of the firms. The effectiveness of highly formalised construction firms is not significantly better than lowly formalised construction firms.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited to medium and large refurbishment projects, with contract value above £500,000.

Practical implications

The paper highlights the need to reduce formalisation in managing refurbishment projects. Large construction firms, which tend to be highly formalised should set up autonomous refurbishment division to manage refurbishment projects.

Originality/value

The paper shows that the formalisation of the organizational structure of construction firms affects the level of coordination of refurbishment projects.

Details

Facilities, vol. 28 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2007

Vivian W.Y. Tam, C.M. Tam and William C.Y. Ng

The use of prefabrication has been considered as one of the most effective waste minimization methods in the construction context; however, the industry has found…

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5391

Abstract

Purpose

The use of prefabrication has been considered as one of the most effective waste minimization methods in the construction context; however, the industry has found difficulties to implement it. Contractors lack experience in using prefabrication and they do not know how to implement prefabrication to their projects effectively. The purpose of this paper is to present the findings of a study on the implementation of prefabrication in the context of different project types and procurement approaches.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper examines possible project types and procurement methods to maximally gain benefits of using prefabricated building components. A questionnaire survey and structured interviews have been conducted.

Findings

From the results, it should be noted that residential projects and design and build procurement methods are the most effective project types and procurement methods, respectively, in using prefabrication. In the interview discussion, one of the governmental employees highlighted that about 65 percent of projects are residential projects. The high supply of residential housing suits fast population growth in Hong Kong. The interviewee also explained that shortening construction period is one of the main goals in their projects. Furthermore, an interviewed main contractor highlighted that the involvement of contractors at the early design stage in a project can bring advantages in considering construction methods before project commencement on site and to improve project constructability. An interviewed subcontractor also explained that the involvement of construction organizations in the design stage can effectively improve the use of prefabrication in major activities including concreting, plastering and formworking, rather than wet‐trade construction activities. Therefore, the use of standardized designs and prefabricated building components are highly encouraged.

Originality/value

This brings early considerations and suggestions to project parties to improve prefabrication implementation. The effects of prefabrication implementation are also considered.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Heng Li, Zhen Chen, Conrad T.C. Wong and Peter E.D. Love

A quantitative approach for construction pollution control that is based on construction resource levelling is presented. The parameters of construction pollution index…

Abstract

A quantitative approach for construction pollution control that is based on construction resource levelling is presented. The parameters of construction pollution index (CPI) and hazard magnitude (hi) are treated as a pseudo resource and integrated with a project’s construction schedule. When the level of pollution for site operations exceeds the permissible limit identified by a regulatory body, a Genetic Algorithm (GA) enhanced levelling technique is used to re‐schedule project activities so that the level of pollution can be re‐distributed and thus reduced. The GA enhanced resource levelling technique is demonstrated using 20 on‐site construction activities in a project. Experimental results indicate that the proposed GA enhanced resource levelling method performs better than the traditional resource levelling method used in MS Project©. The proposed method is an effective tool that can be used by project managers to reduce the level of pollution at a particular period of time; when other control methods fail.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2009

Wichan Pewdum, Thammasak Rujirayanyong and Vanee Sooksatra

The purpose of this paper is to develop models to forecast final budget and duration of a highway construction project during construction stage.

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3077

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop models to forecast final budget and duration of a highway construction project during construction stage.

Design/methodology/approach

Highway construction project data are collected and analyzed to find out factors affecting project final budget and duration before developing the forecasting models, research for which is based on the principle of Artificial Neural Network (ANN). The forecasting results obtained from the proposed method are compared with those obtained from the current method based on earned value.

Findings

Factors affecting final budget and duration are presented. The forecasting results obtained from the proposed method based on ANN application are more accurate and stable than those obtained from the current method based on earned value.

Research limitations/implications

Factors affecting final budget and duration may differ if applied in other countries, since the project data were collected in the Kingdom of Thailand. The forecasting models, therefore, must be reconsidered for better outcomes.

Practical implications

The study presents a useful tool for the highway construction project manager to predict project final budget and duration. The results can potentially provide early warning of over‐budget and schedule delay.

Originality/value

The ANN models to forecast final budget and duration of highway construction projects during the construction stage, developed by using project data reflecting continual and seasonal cycle data, can provide better predicting results.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2008

Grant Keeble Kululanga and Witness Shaibu Kuotcha

Some of the vital lessons that could have been learned from project reviews are lost by contractors because of lack of a structured framework for undertaking them. Even…

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1466

Abstract

Purpose

Some of the vital lessons that could have been learned from project reviews are lost by contractors because of lack of a structured framework for undertaking them. Even though the construction business environment has moved toward modernising some of its business processes, unnecessary loss of lessons still characterise the industry. This paper aims to report a study that explores the development of a structured tool for measuring the constructs of the project review process in order to ensure organisational learning.

Design/methodology/approach

To ascertain the significance of the project review process, a study was undertaken in Malawi. A questionnaire survey was employed to elicit data on the constructs of the project review process that was distributed to Malawian registered construction contractors. Of the 84 sampled construction contractors, 60 completed questionnaires were received.

Findings

The results suggest that size and experience play a significant role in the way that construction contractors appropriate lessons from the various constructs of project reviews. Furthermore, the enablers of project review were significantly correlated to lessons learned, shared and planned for implementation at p <0.01 for a correlation coefficient of 0.875. However, implementation plans and application of total quality management tools in conducting project reviews had by far the least mean scores.

Research limitations/implications

The study forms the basis for further research; replication of this study to other parts of world could yield rich lessons for construction industry.

Originality/value

The constructs of project review process employed in this study can be used to design intervention frameworks for capturing lessons learned.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 15 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 23 November 2021

Olufisayo Adewumi Adedokun, Temitope Egbelakin, Deborah Oluwafunke Adedokun and Johnson Adafin

Despite the huge capital outlay in tertiary education building projects (TEBP), these projects undoubtedly failed in meeting the set objectives of cost, time and quality…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the huge capital outlay in tertiary education building projects (TEBP), these projects undoubtedly failed in meeting the set objectives of cost, time and quality, among others. Therefore, rather than the impacts of risks on the overall project performance, which is common in the construction management literature, the purpose of this study is to assess the impacts of risk factors on the criteria for measuring the success of public TEBP.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopted a quantitative research method where the data collection was via a questionnaire survey. The researcher administered 452 questionnaires to the client representatives, consultants and contractors involved in building projects across five public tertiary education institutions in Ondo State, Nigeria. Of 452 questionnaires, 279 were retrieved and suitable for the analysis, translating to a 61.73% response rate. The reliability analysis of the research instrument showed 0.965 and 0.807, via Cronbach’s alpha test, indicating high reliability of the instrument used for data collection.

Findings

The study found different risk factors affecting the criteria for measuring the success of TEBP. For instance, the environmental risk factor significantly impacted completion to cost, while financial and political risk factors significantly impacted completion to time. In addition, while environmental, legal and management risks significantly impacted end-user satisfaction, safety performance was significantly impacted by logistic, legal, design, construction, political and management risks. Besides, the logistic, legal, design, construction, financial, political and management risk factors impacted profit. However, despite profit being one of the criteria for measuring the success of building projects, it recorded the highest risk impacts amounting to 41% variance.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are limited to the public tertiary education building projects procured via competitive tendering; therefore, the results might differ when considering other procurement methods.

Practical implications

The practical implication is that rather than focusing on all risk factors, the project stakeholders could give adequate attention to the significant risk factors impacting each of the parameters for measuring the success of education building projects.

Originality/value

The study revealed specific risk factors impacting the criteria for measuring the success of TEBP, which extend beyond the use of the overall project performance approach.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

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