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Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2016

Laura Mauldin and Tara Fannon

The purpose of this paper is to provide a literature review of investigations into the specific disability of deafness in the field of sociology and other closely related fields.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a literature review of investigations into the specific disability of deafness in the field of sociology and other closely related fields.

Methodology/approach

After a pilot search using databases appropriate to social science research, we developed key search terms and, using an inductive approach, we identified major themes in the literature.

Findings

Our review shows that deafness has been investigated for a long time in sociology and other related fields, that there is a wide range of themes in scholarly work on the experiences of deaf communities and deaf people, and that conceptualizations of deafness and d/Deaf communities have changed over time. We organize this paper around six major themes we identified, and a few highlighted pieces of scholarship illustrate these themes along the way. We particularly focus on scholarship from the late 1960s through the early 1990s as emblematic of seismic shifts in studying deafness, although we do highlight little known nineteenth century work as well.

Research implications

This paper captures the legacy of this past scholarship and reveals that deafness is a rich site of inquiry that can contribute to the field of sociology. It is also a valuable resource for any future sociological research into deafness, deaf people, and deaf communities. We conclude with a discussion of our findings, commentary on the extent to which previous scholarship on the sociology of deafness has or has not figured into current scholarship and suggestions for future research.

Details

Sociology Looking at Disability: What Did We Know and When Did We Know it
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-478-5

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 25 November 2019

Carmen Rebecca Britton and Laura Mauldin

This chapter focuses on the experiences of disabled Tamil and Sinhalese women in Sri Lanka.

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter focuses on the experiences of disabled Tamil and Sinhalese women in Sri Lanka.

Methods/Approach

Using fieldwork observations and in-depth interviews obtained through Community-Based Rehabilitation (CBR) programs over 13 months across four distinct districts in Sri Lanka, we examine complex sociocultural issues at the intersection of gender and disability.

Findings

These women’s narratives about their lives show the physical and social barriers related to the accessibility of everyday activities, and also the complex gender norms relating to social expectations to stay hidden from public view, contradictory messages around love and marriage, and reactions to and consequences of being disabled women in public.

Implications/Value

The results support calls to prioritize disabled voices in disability research in the Global South, which is currently dominated by a CBR approach in the name of “development.” These data also show the need to systematically address power relations currently at work in policies, practices, and communities that perpetuate disablement; document the need for communities and research to be more inclusive; and obligate scholars and practitioners to be more aware of how the CBR context may aim for development and change, yet often maintain highly gendered economic, political, and social processes of isolation. This project illustrates the ways in which careful attention to personal stories can illuminate complex socio-cultural processes. The chapter also brings voices of women in the Global South into the discourses on narratives and disability, both of which are dominated by perspectives from the industrialized west.

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Book part
Publication date: 25 November 2019

Linda M. Blum

Rates of less perceptible social–behavioral–emotional disorders thought to be based in neurobiological brain differences have burgeoned, though much of disability studies…

Abstract

Purpose

Rates of less perceptible social–behavioral–emotional disorders thought to be based in neurobiological brain differences have burgeoned, though much of disability studies remains focused on the need to challenge compulsory able-bodiedness. This chapter examines instead diverse families living with adult sons’ and daughters’ invisible disabilities, asking how mothers may challenge compulsory able-mindedness.

Methodology/Approach

This chapter is based on 15 in-depth interviews conducted in 2017 and 2018 with mothers originally interviewed between 2003 and 2008.

Findings

The accounts foreground tensions for those at the boundaries of “normality” in a culture that valorizes citizen’s independence, productivity, and heroic overcoming of any inability. Mothers of “precariously normal” adult sons and daughters invited to reflect on their earlier accounts reveal both the power of such dominant narratives and the possibilities to disrupt and challenge this public storytelling.

Implications/Value

Findings of this study point to the alternative narratives and identities sought by disability studies and bring invisible social–behavioral–emotional disabilities into discussions that have largely centered on visible physical disabilities. These findings also underscore the complex similarities and differences in families’ experiences of disability across class and race divides, while suggesting the need for institutional change and greater, less punitive, public resources.

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Abstract

Details

New Narratives of Disability
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-144-5

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Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2016

Abstract

Details

Sociology Looking at Disability: What Did We Know and When Did We Know it
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-478-5

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2016

Abstract

Details

Sociology Looking at Disability: What Did We Know and When Did We Know it
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-478-5

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 25 November 2019

Abstract

Details

New Narratives of Disability
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-144-5

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Book part
Publication date: 15 January 2021

Jennifer Pearson, Lindsey Wilkinson and Jamie Lyn Wooley-Snider

Purpose: Sexual minority youth are more likely than their heterosexual peers to consider and attempt suicide, in part due to victimization experienced within schools…

Abstract

Purpose: Sexual minority youth are more likely than their heterosexual peers to consider and attempt suicide, in part due to victimization experienced within schools. While existing research suggests that rates of school victimization and suicidality among sexual minority students vary by school and community context, less is known about variation in these experiences at the state level.

Methodology: Using data from a large, representative sample of sexual minority and heterosexual youth (2017 Youth Risk Behavior States Data, n = 64,746 high school students in 22 states), multilevel models examine whether differences between sexual minority and heterosexual students in victimization and suicide risk vary by state-level policies.

Findings: Results suggest that disparities between sexual minority and heterosexual boys in bullying, suicide ideation, and suicide attempt are consistently smaller in states with high levels of overall policy support for LGBTQ equality and nondiscrimination in education laws. Sexual minority girls are more likely than heterosexual girls to be electronically bullied, particularly in states with lower levels of LGBTQ equality. Disparities between sexual minority and heterosexual girls in suicide ideation are lowest in high equality states, but state policies are not significantly associated with disparities in suicide attempt among girls.

Value: Overall, findings suggest that state-level policies supporting LGBTQ equality are associated with a reduced risk of suicide among sexual minority youth. This study speaks to the role of structural stigma in shaping exposure to minority stress and its consequences for sexual minority youth's well-being.

Details

Sexual and Gender Minority Health
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-147-1

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 25 November 2019

Ahoo Tabatabai

Using queer/crip theory as a frame, I examine the narratives of 17 mothers raising children with disabilities.

Abstract

Purpose/Methods/Approach

Using queer/crip theory as a frame, I examine the narratives of 17 mothers raising children with disabilities.

Findings

Results show that the mothers’ narratives of an imagined future for their children often involve the idea of success in terms of production and reproduction. However, some mothers do question this idea of normalcy, challenge deeply seated ideas about neoliberal inclusion, and reframe disability as a different way of existing as opposed to a deficient way of being.

Implications/Value

The focus of this paper is on how mothers imagine different kinds of social arrangements. Some mothers, instead of embracing success as narrowly defined under neoliberalism, challenge the idea and instead offer queer narratives of parenting. This study illustrates how counternarratives can be constructed to resist prevailing narratives of disability as deficiency.

Details

New Narratives of Disability
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-144-5

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1997

Alan Poulter

A ‘World Wide Web search engine’ is defined as a retrieval service, consisting of a database (or databases) describing mainly resources available on the World Wide Web…

Abstract

A ‘World Wide Web search engine’ is defined as a retrieval service, consisting of a database (or databases) describing mainly resources available on the World Wide Web (WWW), search software and a user interface also available via WWW. After intro ducing early Internet search engines, which are pertinent as precursors for the current range of WWW search engines, the problems of searching the WWW (link persistence, lack of integrated search software) and the resulting search engine types (keyword or directory) are analysed. Search engines of all types are then compared across their generic features (database content, retrieval software, and search interface), rather than on a search engine by search engine basis. Finally, wider information access issues aris ing from the nature of the Internet and web search engines are considered, and a general strategy for using web search engines is proposed.

Details

Program, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

Keywords

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