Search results

1 – 10 of over 115000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 26 March 2021

Isabel C. Botero and Tomasz A. Fediuk

Abstract

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 8 July 2010

Ernesto J. Poza

Family shareholders expecting to fulfill their responsibility of aligning management interests with shareholder priorities and holding management accountable need a…

Abstract

Family shareholders expecting to fulfill their responsibility of aligning management interests with shareholder priorities and holding management accountable need a thorough understanding of financial statements. They need to be able to make sense of what the numbers say about the firm and its competitiveness. Financial literacy is, therefore, essential knowledge for every shareholder, not just the ones active in the management of the company. Without it, the desirable alignment of management and shareholders is at risk. Without it, family-business shareholders can easily become just as indifferent or impatient, fickle, and greedy as hedge fund managers and investors on Wall Street. The latter, aided by analysts and the media, often pressure well-managed publicly traded companies into short-term thinking.

Details

Entrepreneurship and Family Business
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-097-2

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 15 September 2020

Jo Easton

Abstract

Details

Death in Custody
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-026-4

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 15 September 2020

Jo Easton

Abstract

Details

Death in Custody
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-026-4

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 8 July 2010

Ritch L. Sorenson, Andy Yu and Keith H. Brigham

The past decade of empirical research has established a body of knowledge about family business. A summary of this body of knowledge can be a guide for the content of…

Abstract

The past decade of empirical research has established a body of knowledge about family business. A summary of this body of knowledge can be a guide for the content of family business instruction. One such summary now exists. A recent study compiled and assembled the dependent variables used in family business research (Yu, Lumpkin, Brigham, & Sorenson, 2009). This paper summarizes the findings of that study, discusses the extent to which course content in family business matches the current state of the field, and comments about possibilities going forward for courses in family business. Two textbooks are used to illustrate current course content: Family Business by Poza (2007) and Strategic Planning for the Family Business by Carlock and Ward (2001).

Details

Entrepreneurship and Family Business
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-097-2

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Todd Woodruff

The need to care for families has been a command focus within the United States military for a number of years. Operations in Afghanistan and Iraq, and the resulting risk…

Abstract

The need to care for families has been a command focus within the United States military for a number of years. Operations in Afghanistan and Iraq, and the resulting risk and family separation, have made the care of families and their satisfaction with military life enormously important due to their impact on retention, morale, and readiness. The US Army has taken a two-pronged approach to caring for families: (1) family friendly leadership; and (2) family friendly programs and policies. Like many other organisations, the Army has invested heavily in family friendly policies and programs, such as family support groups, affordable childcare, medical care, and systems so spouses can communicate during periods of separation. Over the last 15 years, the Army's focus on families has produced a much improved system of support, resulting in almost two-thirds of spouses rating the Army's family support as excellent or good during the war in Iraq.1 (Ricks, 2004, p. 9) While family friendly policies and programs are important in reducing work–family conflict and developing commitment, they are only part of the solution, and are much more effective when combined with supportive leadership. By themselves, policies and programs offer an incomplete solution that would achieve only partial success at best, particularly as the level of demands made by the organisation increase.

Details

Military Missions and their Implications Reconsidered: The Aftermath of September 11th
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-012-8

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 28 July 2021

Ilhami Yucel, Muhammed Sabri Şirin and Murat Baş

This paper aims to investigate whether there is a relationship between work–family conflict and turnover intention and whether work engagement has a mediating effect and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate whether there is a relationship between work–family conflict and turnover intention and whether work engagement has a mediating effect and supervisor support has a moderated mediation effect in this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample of the study is composed of public hospital employees in Erzincan province. After removing the missing and incorrect ones from the questionnaires distributed to 1,044 employees of the hospital, 350 were evaluated. The data of the survey were analyzed and interpreted with statistical package programs. Regression analysis is used to investigate the association between the variables.

Findings

This paper finds significant negative associations of work–family conflict with work engagement and work engagement with turnover intention. A significant positive association is found between work–family conflict and turnover intention. In the meantime work engagement has a partial mediating effect on this relationship. Another important result of the research is that supervisor support has a moderator role between work–family conflict and work engagement and has a moderated mediation role at the model in which work–family conflict is independent, turnover intention is dependent and work engagement is a mediator variable.

Research limitations/implications

The research was conducted only in Erzincan province with a limited number of participants, and only health sector employees were examined. It is possible to obtain distinct results in future research studies conducted on different sector employees. Moreover, only the work–family conflict variable was examined in the research. It is possible to expand the scope by also including the family–work conflict variable in future studies.

Originality/value

This research is the first study examining the mediating role of work engagement in the relationship between work–family conflict and turnover intention on healthcare employees in Turkey. Also, this paper is the first attempt to investigate moderated mediation model with the specified variables (work–family conflict, turnover intention, work engagement and supervisor support) in the model by using the frameworks of leader–member exchange and social exchange theories. This research answers research calls to study the moderating function of supervisor support during mediating role of work engagement, since the moderation impact clarifies the circumstances under which supervisor support is connected with the favorable results. This study also revealed how effective the supervisor support is on employees experiencing work–family conflict and their attitudes like work engagement and turnover intention. The consequences of such studies influence the way organizations handle and solve the problems in their organizations today. It takes into account moderated mediation modeling with the management subject in hospital employees.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 30 July 2021

Aleš Kubíček and Ondřej Machek

The purpose of this study is to integrate status conflict, as a relatively recent and unexplored phenomenon, to the family business literature.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to integrate status conflict, as a relatively recent and unexplored phenomenon, to the family business literature.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors follow multilevel theory building to develop a multilevel conceptual model of status conflict in family firms (FFs).

Findings

The authors identify the main antecedents, processes and consequences of status conflict at three levels of analysis (individual, family and firm) unique to FFs. Seventeen theoretical propositions at three levels of analysis are presented.

Originality/value

The authors address the need for multilevel research for organisations and multilevel status research, contribute to the under-researched theory of conflicts in FFs and show that the conflict literature, which has predominantly focussed on the individual- and group-level factors, can borrow from the family business literature, which has primarily been oriented to the group- and firm-level factors.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 August 2021

Said Muhammad, Kong Ximei, Zahoor Ul Haq, Irshad Ali and Nicholas Beutell

The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has had profound economic effects, putting women entrepreneurs at considerable risk of losing income and sales growth as a result. This…

Abstract

Purpose

The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has had profound economic effects, putting women entrepreneurs at considerable risk of losing income and sales growth as a result. This study aims to examine whether the COVID-19 pandemic is a blessing or a curse for women entrepreneurs in Pakistan’s informal sector. The influence of business type, family support and other socio-economic factors on the sales volume of women’s businesses is examined.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 400 women entrepreneurs using a survey questionnaire. Logistic regression was used to investigate the relationships between perceived sales volume and socio-economic as well as demographic factors of women entrepreneurs.

Findings

Findings for RQ1 revealed that the pandemic was a blessing for cloth and cosmetic entrepreneurs, but a curse for those women selling dairy products. Results for RQ2 showed that age, homeownership, household size, family support and type of business were significant predictors of sales. Furthermore, women entrepreneurs were greatly influenced by their family’s desires and decisions, such that women entrepreneurs who received support from families and relatives reported higher sales than those who did not receive such support.

Practical implications

The results may assist policymakers in designing supportive programs to encourage women’s informal entrepreneurial activities. Creating entrepreneurial ecosystems may provide support for women entrepreneurs beyond family support. The findings provide a better understanding of women’s business effectiveness during COVID-19 pandemic. It reveals the resilience of women entrepreneurs in the face of cultural, economic and institutional constraints encountered during the pandemic.

Originality/value

This study is unique because it focuses on the impact of the pandemic at the household level rather than examining broad macroeconomic scenarios. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first attempt to explore the informal, home-based business sector of women entrepreneurs in Pakistan during the pandemic.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 22 July 2021

Erhan Kilincarslan

This study aims to investigate the impact of board independence on the cash dividend payments of family firms listed on the Borsa Istanbul (BIST) in balancing controlling…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the impact of board independence on the cash dividend payments of family firms listed on the Borsa Istanbul (BIST) in balancing controlling families’ power to mitigate agency problems between family and minority shareholders in the post-2012 period. The authors focus on this period because Turkish authorities implemented mandatory regulations on the employment of independent directors on boards from fiscal year 2012.

Design/methodology/approach

The research model uses a panel dataset of 153 BIST-listed family firms over the period 2012–2017, employs alternative dependent variables and regression techniques and is applied to various sub-groups to improve robustness.

Findings

The empirical results show a strong positive effect of board independence on dividend decisions. The authors further detect that family directorship exhibits a negative effect, whereas both board size and audit committees have positive influences but chief executive officer (CEO)/duality has had no significant impact on the dividend policies of Turkish family firms since the new compulsory legal requirements in the Turkish market.

Research limitations/implications

The findings suggest that independent directorship and dividend policy are complementary governance mechanisms to reduce agency conflicts between families and minority shareholders in Turkey, which is a civil law-based emerging country characterized by high family ownership concentration.

Practical implications

The authors present evidence that Turkish family firms’ corporate boards have evolved, to some extent, from being managerial rubber stamps to more independent boards that raise opposing voices in family decision-making. However, independent directors’ preference for dividend-induced capital market monitoring implies that their direct monitoring is less effective than it is supposed to be. This suggests a need to revise the Turkish Corporate Governance Principles to enhance independent directors’ monitoring and supervisory power.

Originality/value

This is thought to be the first study to provide insights on how board independence influences dividend policy in controlling agency problems in Turkish family firms since Turkish authorities introduced compulsory rules on the employment of independent directors on boards.

Details

International Journal of Accounting & Information Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1834-7649

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 115000