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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Sheila L. Darrow

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Reference Reviews, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2021

Lin Zhang

Expanding the research on traditional history of economic ideology into the research on the history of economics composed of three elements – history of ideology, history

Abstract

Purpose

Expanding the research on traditional history of economic ideology into the research on the history of economics composed of three elements – history of ideology, history of policies and events – is a new idea for researching the history of socialist political economy with Chinese characteristics. The start of the history of socialist political economy with Chinese characteristics is consistent with that of the Sinicization of Marxist political economy and can be dated from at least 1917.

Design/methodology/approach

The key point of the research on the history of ideologies of the socialist political economy with Chinese characteristics is to treat the relationship between theory and people properly, i.e. we should not neglect the effect brought out by the economists on theory construction while we attach importance to the theoretical contribution of the leaders and leading group of the Communist Party of China (CPC).

Findings

For the research on the history of economic policies of socialist political economy with Chinese characteristics, on the one hand, we should clarify the relationship among ideologies, strategies and policies; on the other hand, we should not evade the summarization of lessons from history.

Originality/value

Besides presenting the development route of socialist political economy with Chinese characteristics under competition, the research on the events in the history of socialist political economy with Chinese characteristics should also help develop the socialist political economy with Chinese characteristics.

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China Political Economy, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2516-1652

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Article
Publication date: 10 September 2021

Peter Watt

This paper aims to reconsider the significance of Henry Ford’s claim that “History is more or less bunk”. It argues that this seemingly philistine remark can be understood…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to reconsider the significance of Henry Ford’s claim that “History is more or less bunk”. It argues that this seemingly philistine remark can be understood as a specific historiographical position which informed Ford’s wider worldview, management approach and philosophy of industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on primary philosophical works, secondary criticism and archival evidence. These sources detail the context in which the claim was made, the ideas underpinning its articulation and the conceptual basis on which Ford’s wider perspectives and contributions to historical experience can be interpreted.

Findings

This paper interprets Ford’s claim as a gesture of allegiance to a deeper cultural sensibility that was informed by Ralph Waldo Emerson’s transcendental view of history.

Practical implications

In addition to offering a rereading of Ford’s historiographical position, Emerson’s thought is discussed in relation to Ford’s subsequent “living history” project (Greenfield Village), which is considered the materialisation of his historical and industrial worldview.

Originality/value

This interpretation reveals how a specific historiographical position held by one of the twentieth century’s leading industrialists offers new insights into his wider worldview and philosophy of industry. It contributes to recent studies that challenge taken-for-granted narratives in management history and recent work that has highlighted the influence of transcendental principles on Ford’s philosophy of industry.

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Journal of Management History, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

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Article
Publication date: 8 September 2021

Terrance Weatherbee and Donna Sears

This paper aims to examine how wineries used history in their marketing communications to overcome the liability of newness in a settled field that valorizes duration and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine how wineries used history in their marketing communications to overcome the liability of newness in a settled field that valorizes duration and longevity.

Design/methodology/approach

A multiple-case study investigated the treatment of history in marketing by young wineries in a new wine region. Data included interviews, site visits and marketing communications.

Findings

Wineries worked to communicate stakeholder legitimacy and authenticity by constructing organizational histories through bricolage, communicating history in symbolic, material and practice forms.

Research limitations/implications

Young organizations can communicate field legitimacy and projections of organizational and product authenticity through constructed histories. Results may not be generalizable to other jurisdictions as wine marketing is normatively subject to government regulation. The importance of history in marketing communications also varies across sectors.

Practical implications

Young businesses in sectors where tradition, place and longevity are venerated can establish authenticity and legitimacy through the marketization of history by following practices that demonstrate adherence to tradition and making thoughtful choices in the construction of the symbolic and material aspects of their organizations.

Originality/value

This study demonstrates that new/young organizations can use bricolage to create their own marketized histories as proxies for age.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

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Article
Publication date: 23 September 2021

Anthony Galluzzo

The purpose of this paper is to study how several brands like Poulain, Liebig and Guérin have helped to disseminate the French roman national through their…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study how several brands like Poulain, Liebig and Guérin have helped to disseminate the French roman national through their chromolithographs at the beginning of the 20th century. By doing so, the paper highlights the participation of brands in the co-construction of the French roman national, a historical narrative that articulates state-supported collective memories.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 1,106 historical trade cards have been collected and analyzed. Historical studies of the roman national have been used as secondary sources to aid in the interpretation of the motifs conveyed in those chromolithographs.

Findings

Chromolithographic images produced by various brands at the beginning of the 20th century contributed to the roman national. They provide an ethnocentric, patriotic and linear view of history but are also crossed by political fault lines, opposing secular and Catholic visions of history.

Originality/value

The chromolithographs produced and disseminated by companies have so far only been analyzed as promotional tools, aimed at popularizing brands and stores. By studying roman national motifs, this paper helps us understand what role businesses have played in building other narratives and forging a national spirit.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

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Article
Publication date: 8 September 2021

Jayne Krisjanous and Christine Hallett

The aim of this paper is to demonstrate how a historical event packaged as an iconic heritage cultural brand can be marketized and modified over time to ensure brand…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to demonstrate how a historical event packaged as an iconic heritage cultural brand can be marketized and modified over time to ensure brand longevity and continued emotional commitment and loyalty through the leverage of stories and associations more closely aligned with modern-day audiences. The authors do this through examining the marketization of the New Zealand World War 1 (WWI) nurse to today’s audiences. The periods of study are WWI (1914–1918) and then the modern day. The New Zealand Army Nursing Service (NZANS) during WWI has previously had little attention as a key actor in the Australia and New Zealand Army Corp (ANZAC), Today ANZAC is held as pivotal in the birth of New Zealand’s perception of nationhood and as an iconic heritage cultural brand. The history and legend of the ANZAC plays an important role in New Zealand culture and is fundamental to the “Anzac Spirit”, a signifier of what it means to be a New Zealander.

Design/methodology/approach

A historical case study method is used. The primary source of data is 1914–1918, and includes contemporaneous articles, and personal writings: diaries, letters and published memoirs. More contemporary works form the basis for discussion of marketization as it relates to the NZANS. The article first presents conceptual framing, then the development of the Anzac brand and the history of the NZANS and its role in WWI before turning to discussion on the marketization of this nursing service to today’s audiences and as part of the ANZAC/Anzac brand.

Findings

Today the story of the WWI NZANS nurse, previously seldom heard, has been co-opted and is becoming increasingly merged as an integral part of the Anzac story. The history of the NZANS during WWI has a great deal of agency today as part of that story, serving many functions within it and providing a valuable lever for marketization.

Originality/value

To date, there is a scarcity of marketing analysis that examines the marketization of history. By focusing on New Zealand WWI nursing as a contributor to the Anzac story, the authors contribute to the understanding of how marketers package and contemporize history for appeal to audiences through both sustaining and reworking cultural branding.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

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Article
Publication date: 10 September 2021

Alyssa J. Whitford

This study aims to investigate elementary students’ perceptions about women’s roles throughout US history, and the extent to which these perceptions can be challenged or…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate elementary students’ perceptions about women’s roles throughout US history, and the extent to which these perceptions can be challenged or expanded by interactive read-alouds.

Design/methodology/approach

Third-grade students participated in interviews designed to investigate their thoughts about women’s historical roles before and after engaging in a series of interactive read-alouds featuring notable women in history. Pre- and post-interviews were analyzed to assess shifts in perception.

Findings

The research findings suggest that students initially perceived historical women as insignificant and held stereotypical views about their roles and that this perception was challenged following the interactive read-alouds. Changes were indicated through increased references to women during interviews and through answers that challenged stereotypical views.

Originality/value

This study adds insight about students’ perceptions regarding women’s history and supports the use of interactive read-alouds to challenge stereotypical views of women’s historical roles.

Details

Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2021

Hanadi Shatara

The purpose of this study is to present the development of justice-oriented worldviews among three New York City public school global history teachers and its…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to present the development of justice-oriented worldviews among three New York City public school global history teachers and its manifestations in their curriculum and practice.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative study, part of a larger study, relied on interviews centering around participants' backgrounds, international experiences and global perspectives, along with observations of their teaching.

Findings

The findings show that participants' experiences, particularly with global issues such as climate change, capitalism, and global inequality influenced their worldviews to focus on justice. As a result, there were direct connections of their justice-oriented worldviews in their teaching of global history.

Originality/value

This study highlights the ways in which global history teachers' worldviews influence their teaching practice. Presenting justice-oriented teaching allows for veteran and future teachers to consider this type of instruction in their world history and global studies classroom. Additionally, this study provides insight into the intersections of world history and global education taking place within secondary classrooms that focus on justice rather than traditional world history content teaching.

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Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2021

Matthew Fearns-Davies, Tsutomu Kubota, Fumina Tachibana, Yuko Kato and Ian Davies

This paper describes and discusses collaboration between history teachers in England and Japan. The purpose of this paper is to explore the ways in which history is taught…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper describes and discusses collaboration between history teachers in England and Japan. The purpose of this paper is to explore the ways in which history is taught in each country as a part of a general commitment to international collaboration and as a means by which we could explore the connection between history education and global citizenship education.

Design/methodology/approach

The teachers created two lessons (one from England and one from Japan) about the Russian revolution. Both lessons were taught in each country. Data were gathered from students and teachers to aid reflections on the nature and outcome of the collaboration.

Findings

The collaboration was very positive. Teachers and students were excited to work together and to experience different ways of learning about the past. There were different approaches to the ways in which knowledge was characterized in each country (teachers in England emphasizing contextually based historical interpretations; teachers in Japan emphasizing content and contextual knowledge).

Originality/value

This work contributes to the limited amount of research that is currently available about professional collaboration between high school teachers and students of history in Japan and England. The arguments that are made about the opportunities for international collaboration in the context of different characterizations of pedagogical content knowledge contribute to a relatively unexplored field. The authors contribute to our understandings of the relationship between history education and global citizenship education.

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Asian Education and Development Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-3162

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Article
Publication date: 21 October 2013

Gloria L. Rhodes

-- The purpose of this paper is to identify unique oral history centres and collections which provide users with training and research methodology techniques necessary to…

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Abstract

Purpose

-- The purpose of this paper is to identify unique oral history centres and collections which provide users with training and research methodology techniques necessary to planning an effective oral history programme

Design/methodology/approach

-- This article provides a list of oral history centres and collections with unique oral history programmes. Most centres listed also offer the user detailed instructions on planning oral history programmes and use of the collection in research methodology courses. The bibliography is an international list of oral history programmes and collections.

Findings

-- There are numerous oral history programmes within university departments, museums, and as part of state and regional organizations.

Originality/value

-- This bibliography includes international as well as programmes in the USA. The annotations describe the oral history programmes' subject content, and will be of interest to scholars looking to start and expand on research with an oral history methodology component.

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 27 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

Keywords

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