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Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2016

Laura Mauldin and Tara Fannon

The purpose of this paper is to provide a literature review of investigations into the specific disability of deafness in the field of sociology and other closely related fields.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a literature review of investigations into the specific disability of deafness in the field of sociology and other closely related fields.

Methodology/approach

After a pilot search using databases appropriate to social science research, we developed key search terms and, using an inductive approach, we identified major themes in the literature.

Findings

Our review shows that deafness has been investigated for a long time in sociology and other related fields, that there is a wide range of themes in scholarly work on the experiences of deaf communities and deaf people, and that conceptualizations of deafness and d/Deaf communities have changed over time. We organize this paper around six major themes we identified, and a few highlighted pieces of scholarship illustrate these themes along the way. We particularly focus on scholarship from the late 1960s through the early 1990s as emblematic of seismic shifts in studying deafness, although we do highlight little known nineteenth century work as well.

Research implications

This paper captures the legacy of this past scholarship and reveals that deafness is a rich site of inquiry that can contribute to the field of sociology. It is also a valuable resource for any future sociological research into deafness, deaf people, and deaf communities. We conclude with a discussion of our findings, commentary on the extent to which previous scholarship on the sociology of deafness has or has not figured into current scholarship and suggestions for future research.

Details

Sociology Looking at Disability: What Did We Know and When Did We Know it
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-478-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1974

The Secretary of State for Social Services, in exercise of powers conferred by sections 56 and 85 of the National Insurance (Industrial Injuries) Act 1965 and section 57…

Abstract

The Secretary of State for Social Services, in exercise of powers conferred by sections 56 and 85 of the National Insurance (Industrial Injuries) Act 1965 and section 57 of that Act as modified by section 8 of the National Insurance Act 1966 and section 5 of the National Insurance Act 1972, and of all other powers enabling her in that behalf, after reference to the Industrial Injuries Advisory Council, hereby makes the following regulations:—

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 13 October 2017

Laura Margaret Kelly

The purpose of this paper is to provide an insight into the lived realities of d/Deaf prisoners in England and Wales, and to explore previous claims that they suffer…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an insight into the lived realities of d/Deaf prisoners in England and Wales, and to explore previous claims that they suffer disproportionately during their time in custody.

Design/methodology/approach

For the purposes of this study, a qualitative approach was taken. As part of this, 28 semi-structured interviews were carried out at seven adult male prisons in England with a sample of male hard of hearing/d/Deaf prisoners, and staff members who had worked with them. The interviews were recorded using a Dictaphone, and then transcribed as close to verbatim as possible. From this, the transcriptions were analysed using thematic analysis. In addition to interviews, observations were made at each establishment, and later recorded in a fieldwork journal.

Findings

Findings from the study showed that the way a d/Deaf person experiences prison depends strongly on the way in which they identify with their d/Deafness. However, it was also shown that there is little room for either deafness or Deafness in prison, with severely deaf and culturally and linguistically Deaf prisoners commonly experiencing the pains of imprisonment more severely than their hearing peers as a result of the Prison Service’s inability to accommodate such difference.

Originality/value

This study fused together the fields of Deaf Studies and Prison Studies in a way that had not been done before, considering d/Deafness in prison on both an audiological and cultural level. Moreover, excluding small-scale unpublished undergraduate dissertations, it was the first empirical study about d/Deaf prisoners in England and Wales to carry out face-to-face interviews with these prisoners. Finally, as the most in-depth research is yet to be carried out about these particular prisoners in England and Wales, a greater level of insight was provided than previously available.

Details

Journal of Criminal Psychology, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2009-3829

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Book part
Publication date: 28 January 2011

C. Jonah Eleweke

Deafness and hearing impairments have a very interesting and ancient history. The term hearing impairments is used here to refer to any dysfunction of the hearing organ…

Abstract

Deafness and hearing impairments have a very interesting and ancient history. The term hearing impairments is used here to refer to any dysfunction of the hearing organ, regardless of the etiology, degree of hearing loss, and service provision implications. The history of hearing impairments can be traced back to centuries before Christ (BC). For instance, around 1000 BC a Hebrew law provided those with deafness and hearing impairments limited rights to own property and marry. Nonetheless, although this law protected people with hearing impairments from being cursed and maltreated by others, it did not grant them full participation in rituals of the temple (ASLInfo, 2010). People with hearing impairments were considered to be “subnormal” by great philosophers of that time. For instance, between 427 and 347 BC, Plato's philosophy of innate intelligence was the vogue. It claimed that all intelligence was present at birth. Therefore, all people were born with ideas and languages in their minds and required only time to demonstrate their outward sign of intelligence through speech. People with hearing impairments could not speak and were therefore considered incapable of rational thoughts and ideas. Indeed in 355 BC Aristotle was reported to have claimed that those who were born deaf would become stupid and incapable of reason. According to him, people with hearing impairments could not be educated because without the ability to hear, people could not learn. Greek which was spoken in his society was considered the perfect language and all people who did not speak Greek including people with deafness were considered Barbarians (ASLInfo, 2010).

Details

History of Special Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-629-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1972

J. Ashworth

December 6, 1971 Master and servant — Negligence — Noise — Deafness — Workman subjected to loud noise at work — Ear plugs providing inadequate protection — Ear muffs not…

Abstract

December 6, 1971 Master and servant — Negligence — Noise — Deafness — Workman subjected to loud noise at work — Ear plugs providing inadequate protection — Ear muffs not supplied — No encouragement or persuasion to wear ear muffs — Whether negligence — Further loss of hearing resulting from continued negligence after statute‐barred period — Whether full damages recoverable.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Book part
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Aviad E Raz

This paper examines a premarital genetics program focusing on congenital deafness, conducted in Israel with a Bedouin minority group characterized by consanguinity, a…

Abstract

This paper examines a premarital genetics program focusing on congenital deafness, conducted in Israel with a Bedouin minority group characterized by consanguinity, a religious ban on abortion, and high prevalence of genetic diseases. Building on interviews with counselors and counselees as well as observations of the interactions between them, the analysis describes the professional, communal, public and private arenas of negotiation that surround the process of genetic counseling.

Details

Studies in Symbolic Interaction
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-009-8

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Book part
Publication date: 21 December 2010

Cheryl Najarian Souza

Using life history interviews with 10 college-educated Deaf women, this chapter investigates how the women saw themselves “between worlds” and how they balanced being both…

Abstract

Using life history interviews with 10 college-educated Deaf women, this chapter investigates how the women saw themselves “between worlds” and how they balanced being both workers and mothers. While considering Gabel and Peters’ (2004) call for a theory of resistance in the field of disability studies along with Garland-Thomson (2004) who argues for a feminist disability studies theory, the author argues that when theorizing about the construction of a worker, which is a fluid identity, it is necessary to consider notions of gender along with ability and to note places where individuals resist stereotypes placed on them by the larger society. The women of this study resisted ideas of deafness as a “disability” and did things to show they were a linguistic minority and part of the Deaf community. Teaching, in certain contexts, was a place where they educated people about their deafness and became, in their words, “lifetime educators.” Those who worked in hearing offices developed strategies such as being lifetime educators, self-advocates, volunteering in these offices, and often denying a part of their Deaf identity.

Details

Disability as a Fluid State
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-377-5

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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2011

Simon Gibbon and Colin Doyle

This paper aims to review the need for and development of specialist deaf secure mental health services.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the need for and development of specialist deaf secure mental health services.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a review article; it begins by giving a brief overview of deafness and the relationship between deafness, mental health problems and offending. Following this, relevant literature and Department of Health (DoH) guidance is summarised and a description of the current UK services is given.

Findings

In 2001, Young et al. highlighted the needs of deaf mentally disordered offenders and the requirement for specialist forensic mental health services for this group. Since then several DoH guidance documents have been published that, amongst other things, highlighted the need to develop deaf forensic mental health services. There have now been substantial service developments in this area but substantial gaps remain – most notably, a lack of specialist mental health provision for deaf prisoners.

Originality/value

The paper offers insights into the development and future of deaf forensic mental health services.

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

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Article
Publication date: 17 October 2008

Fan Jun, Li Zhitang and Nie Wei

The purpose of this paper is to focus on alleviating the problems of both hidden and exposed terminal, which remain unsolved in many directional MAC protocols.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on alleviating the problems of both hidden and exposed terminal, which remain unsolved in many directional MAC protocols.

Design/methodology/approach

GPS is used to calibrate synchronization among the nodes, and directional antennas are used. In the protocol, different antenna mode and transmit power are used. The assertion signal and omni‐directional RTS are transmitted in omni‐directional mode, while directional CTS, directional RTS, DATA and ACK are transmitted in directional mode. With properly designed RTS‐CTS handshake, the protocol can make full use of spatial reuse of directional communication and enhance parallelism in data transmission.

Findings

The preliminary simulation results indicate that the protocol works well and achieves considerably high performance in both sparse and dense ad hoc networks.

Research limitations/implications

The line of sight environment is the main limitation that the MAC protocol will be applied.

Practical implications

The protocol is a very useful solution for employing directional antennas for ad hoc networks.

Originality/value

The MAC protocol can effectively alleviate the directional hidden and exposed terminal problems as well as node deafness. It can greatly improve throughput and achieve low‐medium access delay, making it suitable for ad hoc networks.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 37 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2008

Helen Miller and Reza Kiani

Prevalence of hearing impairment is quite common in people with learning disabilities (double jeopardy). However, this debilitating co‐morbidity remains largely undetected…

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231

Abstract

Prevalence of hearing impairment is quite common in people with learning disabilities (double jeopardy). However, this debilitating co‐morbidity remains largely undetected by carers and professionals due to presence of additional disabilities and complex clinical presentation in this population on the one hand, and lack of specialist hearing impairment service provision and difficulty in accessing generic audiology services on the other hand. This article aims to provide practical guidance on assessment and management of hearing impairment in people with learning disabilities by offering a narrative review of available literature on gaps in service delivery.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-0180

Keywords

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