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1 – 10 of over 2000
Article
Publication date: 17 January 2023

He Liu, Feng Xu and Chong Wu

As a typical creative behavior, creative process engagement (CPE) has received increased attention in recent years. Leadership behaviors such as leader–member exchange (LMX

Abstract

Purpose

As a typical creative behavior, creative process engagement (CPE) has received increased attention in recent years. Leadership behaviors such as leader–member exchange (LMX) and leader creativity expectations (LCE) have been found as two key predictive factors of CPE. However, the mechanism underlying this relationship is not well understood. This study aims to clarify how LMX influences follower CPE by considering the interplay among LCE, decision autonomy and task interdependence from an interactionist perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a sample of 371 leader–employee dyads from eight enterprises in mainland China, this study conducts a hierarchical regression analysis to test the hypotheses for the proposed model.

Findings

Results reveal that the significant two- and three-way interactions where LCE, decision autonomy and task interdependence moderate the relationship between LMX and follower CPE. The relationship between LMX and follower CPE is not significant as expected, but the moderating role of LCE is positive and significant, and the relationship is strongest when conducted with either low task interdependence or high decision autonomy.

Originality/value

Different from previous research that only investigated one certain leadership factor’ effect on employees' innovative behaviors, this study comprehensively considered the combined influence of two related but significantly different connotation leadership factors on follower CPE and found the contingency effect of LCE on the relationship between LMX and follower CPE. Furthermore, the authors found the regional effectiveness of the leadership factor. The effect of leadership factors on follower CPE varies under the influence of different job characteristics, and is conducive to enrich the interactionist view on follower CPE.

Details

Management Decision, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 January 2023

Ishfaq Ahmed, Talat Islam, Rabia Afzal, Imlak Iqbal and Muhammad Asim Faheem

The authors examined how employee led exchange benefits the organizations. Specifically, the authors aim at investigating the mediating role of family supportive…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors examined how employee led exchange benefits the organizations. Specifically, the authors aim at investigating the mediating role of family supportive supervision between employee performance and taking charge behavior. The authors further examined leader-member exchange (LMX) as a boundary condition between employee performance and family supportive supervision.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collected data from 295 employees and their supervisors working in various public sector organizations of Pakistan on a convenience basis. Specifically, data on family supportive supervision and LMX was collected from employees; whereas, data on employee performance and taking charge was collected from their supervisors between June–September 2021.

Findings

The statistical analysis reveals that high-performing employees are reciprocated by the high family-supportive supervision which increases their work-life balance and they further reciprocate by showing a propensity to take charge. In addition, LMX is noted to strengthen the association between employees' performance and family supportive supervision.

Practical implications

This study explains how managers can extend the stream of employees' performance by highlighting the role of family-supportive supervision and LMX. The managers through high LMX and provision of family-supportive supervision can boost the employees' outcomes from job performance to extra-role performance (i.e. taking charge).

Originality/value

This study adds value to the existing body of knowledge by considering performance as a predictor of various organizational-level consequences. Recent studies have considered the negative consequences of employees' performance, while the positive aspect has been called for an investigation.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 December 2022

Hafiz Muhammad Arshad, Muhammad Waheed Akhtar, Muhammad Imran, Irem Batool, Muhammad Asrar-ul-Haq and Minhas Akbar

China–Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC) is a framework of regional connectivity in which employees have to work in a cross-cultural environment. This study has extended…

Abstract

Purpose

China–Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC) is a framework of regional connectivity in which employees have to work in a cross-cultural environment. This study has extended the leader-member exchange theory by investigating the mediating role of employee commitment (EC) between the relationship of leader-member exchange (LMX) and employee's work-related behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

PLS-SEM technique was used to test the model by utilizing a multi-wave/two-source data collected from employees and their supervisors (n = 500) working in different energy projects of CPEC.

Findings

According to the results/findings, LMX has a significant positive impact on employee commitment, employee performance (EP) and open-minded discussions, but insignificant impact on innovative work behaviour (IWB). Mediating role of employee commitment was significant between the relationship of LMX with EP and open-minded discussions, but insignificant with the IWB.

Originality/value

The study contributes empirical evidence to understanding the leader-member exchange relationship among Chinese managers and Pakistani workers. It also contributes to the LMX theory literature by investigating the effect of LMX on followers' outcomes (employee performance, IWB, open-minded discussions) through employee commitment.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 23 December 2022

Sari Hirvi, Sanna Laulainen, Kristiina Junttila and Johanna Lammintakanen

This study aims to make visible the dynamic nature of leader–member exchange (LMX) in the changing realm of health-care leadership.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to make visible the dynamic nature of leader–member exchange (LMX) in the changing realm of health-care leadership.

Design/methodology/approach

The qualitative study used an open questionnaire, which was distributed amongst nursing staff and managers at a Finnish public university hospital.

Findings

The participants described partly LMX theory, but the leader-member relationship was also influenced by the organizational culture and the existing management practices. Nursing staff were found to have a more variable and dynamic role in the LMX relationship than has previously been reported. The research therefore provided novel information for the field of health-care research.

Research limitations/implications

The presented research was limited by the content of the data, as the collected single narratives were rather short; however, the fact that a large number of narratives were collected from diverse participants strengthened the ability to reliably answer the research questions.

Practical implications

Although the participants described partly LMX theory, the leader–member relationship is also influenced by the organizational culture and existing management practices; the finding that nurses have more variable roles in LMX relationships in the health-care context was new insight in this field. Therefore, the presented findings can help decision-makers change the current, perhaps antiquated, leadership practices at health-care organizations.

Originality/value

This study provides new insight into the field of LMX research in terms of the important role of nursing staff, the organizational factors that influence the LMX relationship and the dynamic nature of LMX relationships.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 November 2022

Dedong Wang and Xiaofei Chen

In temporary construction project organizations, general contractors need to strengthen control over subcontractors through such measures as supervision and coordination…

Abstract

Purpose

In temporary construction project organizations, general contractors need to strengthen control over subcontractors through such measures as supervision and coordination, and resource sharing. In the management process, the good implementation of relational contracts among the general contractor and subcontractors is affected by the quality of relationship between managers and followers. From the perspective of leader–member exchange (LMX) theory, this study explores the influence of LMX, which reflects the quality of relationship between superiors and subordinates, on relational contracts.

Design/methodology/approach

By combining the longitudinal influence mechanism and organizational background of relational contracts in project organizations, this study constructed a multi-level structural equation model. The hypothesis is tested based on data collected from 213 respondents.

Findings

The findings of this study show that LMX has a positive influence on relational contracts and organizational identification in construction project organizations. Organizational identification has a positive effect on relational contracts and plays a mediating role between LMX and relational contracts. Power distance plays a moderating role on the influence of LMX on organizational identification.

Originality/value

This study explores the influence of LMX on relational contracts from a new perspective, which can help establish a high-quality relation of the general contractor and subcontractors in project organizations and enriches the longitudinal study of relational contracts in project organizations.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 17 October 2016

Melissa K. Carsten, Mary Uhl-Bien and Tracy L. Griggs

Building upon relational leadership theory, we develop a theoretical model examining the association between leader-follower congruence in follower role orientation and…

Abstract

Building upon relational leadership theory, we develop a theoretical model examining the association between leader-follower congruence in follower role orientation and manager and subordinate relational and well-being outcomes. Follower role orientation represents individuals’ beliefs regarding the best way to enact a follower role. We predict that managers and subordinates who share similar role orientations will experience higher quality leader-member exchange (LMX) relationships and greater eustress than those who differ in their follower role orientations. Propositions are presented for direct effects between congruence and stress and indirect effects through LMX. Our theoretical model contributes to nascent research on followership by offering greater understanding of manager and subordinate beliefs regarding how followers should enact their roles, and the importance of considering leader (i.e., manager) as well as follower outcomes in the workplace. It also extends current thinking about stress as an important outcome of leader-follower relationships.

Details

The Role of Leadership in Occupational Stress
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-061-9

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 25 October 2022

Lee Di Milia and Zhou Jiang

The authors tested (1) the mediating role of thriving in the association between leader-member exchange (LMX) and work–nonwork balance (WNWB) and (2) the moderating…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors tested (1) the mediating role of thriving in the association between leader-member exchange (LMX) and work–nonwork balance (WNWB) and (2) the moderating effect of gender in the relationship between LMX and thriving.

Design/methodology/approach

Cross-sectional data were collected from six separate participant groups across an eight-month period (n = 522). Data analysis included confirmatory factor analysis to assess the construct validity of the proposed three-factor model. Hierarchical regression and the PROCESS macro were used to test three hypotheses.

Findings

The authors found thriving mediated an indirect effect of LMX on WNWB. In addition, we found that the relationship between LMX and thriving was moderated by gender, such that the relationship was found for females. Overall, the authors identified a moderated-mediation effect indicating an indirect effect of LMX on WNWB via thriving for females.

Research limitations/implications

Cross-sectional design suggests their results are theory driven. The authors suggest future studies replicate the study employing experimental designs.

Practical implications

The authors suggest organisations develop programs to enhance leadership and thriving capabilities as tools to manage WNWB.

Originality/value

The authors add to the thriving literature by revealing gender differences in the effectiveness of relational resources (i.e. LMX) in fostering employee thriving. Furthermore, the authors extend the efficacy of thriving beyond the workplace to include WNWB. The authors demonstrate the skills and knowledge acquired at work can be used to lessen the impact of WNWB.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 8 June 2011

Dana L. Joseph, Daniel A. Newman and Hock-Peng Sin

Purpose – This chapter (a) summarizes leader–member exchange (LMX) measurement practices since the influential reviews by Schriesheim, Castro, and Cogliser (1999) and…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter (a) summarizes leader–member exchange (LMX) measurement practices since the influential reviews by Schriesheim, Castro, and Cogliser (1999) and Gerstner and Day (1997), (b) clarifies the status of LMX as a broad construct from a hierarchical factor model, (c) conducts multitrait-multimethod (MTMM) analyses on leader and follower reports of multidimensional LMX, and (d) investigates discriminant validity between Member LMX and satisfaction with supervisor.

Methodology/Approach – We used (a) a literature search of LMX measurement practices, (b) a combination of meta-analysis and factor analysis to specify the broad LMX construct underlying Liden and Maslyn's (1998) (LMX-MDM) multidimensional instrument, (c) MTMM analyses of leader and member ratings of the LMX-MDM, and (d) a combination of meta-analysis and multiple regression to assess incremental validity of Member LMX beyond satisfaction with supervisor.

Findings – Since 1999, 85% of LMX studies now use one of two dominant LMX scales (LMX-7, Scandura, & Graen, 1984; LMX-MDM, Liden & Maslyn, 1998). These two measures are correlated (rcorrected=.9), suggesting the LMX-7 and the LMX-MDM are alternate forms of the same instrument. 94% of studies that used these two measures treat LMX as a single, broad construct rather than as a multidimensional set of constructs. MTMM analyses suggest Leader LMX and Member LMX are two, separate-but-related constructs (i.e., confirming two source factors and no lower-order trait factors). Last, Member LMX meta-analytically correlates with satisfaction with supervisor at rcorrected=.8. There is some incremental validity of LMX, but the pattern is inconsistent across samples.

Social Implications – We point out that LMX researchers have now moved toward standard measurement of LMX – as a broad, higher-order factor that varies between leader and follower. By doing so, we reveal that the stage is set for cumulative and replicable research on leadership as a dyadic, follower-specific phenomenon.

Originality/Value of Paper – Our chapter is the first to reveal consensus in LMX measurement across studies; to summarize the standard treatment of LMX as a single, broad factor; and to apply MTMM analyses to demonstrate separate Leader LMX and Member LMX source factors.

Book part
Publication date: 26 September 2005

Herman H.M. Tse, Marie T. Dasborough and Neal M. Ashkanasy

Accumulating evidence suggests that Team-member exchange (TMX) influences employee work attitudes and behaviours separately from the effects of leader-member exchange (LMX

Abstract

Accumulating evidence suggests that Team-member exchange (TMX) influences employee work attitudes and behaviours separately from the effects of leader-member exchange (LMX). In particular, little is known of the effect of LMX differentiation (in-group versus out-group) as a process of social exchange that can, in turn, affect TMX quality. To explore this phenomenon, this chapter presents a multi-level model of TMX in organizations, which incorporates LMX differentiation, team identification, team member affect at the individual level, and fairness of LMX differentiation and affective climate at the group-level. We conclude with a discussion of the implications of our model for theory, research, and practice.

Details

The Effect of Affect in Organizational Settings
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-234-4

Book part
Publication date: 20 January 2023

Caitlin Fulcher and Neal M. Ashkanasy

To date, research focus has been on overt forms of abusive supervision, like aggressive behavior and physical violence. Less clear is the effect of implicit abusive…

Abstract

Purpose

To date, research focus has been on overt forms of abusive supervision, like aggressive behavior and physical violence. Less clear is the effect of implicit abusive supervisory behaviors such as gaslighting, a form of psychological manipulation whereby a “gaslighter” seeks to confuse, disorientate, and cast doubt in the mind of a victim. In this study, we aim to examine the effects of supervisory gaslighting on employee's affective organizational commitment (AOC). We also investigate the mediating role of leader-member exchange (LMX) on this relationship and whether employee emotional intelligence (EI) buffers the negative effects of supervisory abuse.

Design

Two hundred and sixty-six participants were allocated to one of three conditions (high, medium, and none) where they read workplace scenarios varying in the level of supervisory gaslighting. Afterward, participants responded to AOC, LMX, and EI scales.

Findings

Results showed supervisory gaslighting decreases employee AOC and that this relationship is partly explained by the employee's relationship with their supervisor. Contrary to expectations, higher employee EI strengthened the effect of gaslighting on AOC.

Value

Supervisory gaslighting remains largely unexplored and this chapter contributes to this topic by testing a model to understand the effects of gaslighting on AOC. These findings provide a solid foundation for further research in this area.

Details

Emotions During Times of Disruption
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80382-838-1

Keywords

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