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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2010

James D. Hess and Arnold C. Bacigalupo

The leader of the knowledge‐based organization is faced with the continuing dilemma of delivering the highest quality and most technologically innovative products or

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Abstract

Purpose

The leader of the knowledge‐based organization is faced with the continuing dilemma of delivering the highest quality and most technologically innovative products or services at the lowest possible cost in a rapidly changing environment. This paper aims to start with the identification of the complexities of managing the knowledge‐based organization, using emotional intelligence to balance the interests of the individual and organization, and it may also be redefined as an organizational development process rather than an outcome.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to be effective the knowledge‐based leader must possess the characteristics most often associated with the description of emotional intelligence and must also be effective at injecting these same characteristics throughout the organization. Utilizing the premises of Stewart's intellectual economy and adapting the work of Buckingham and Coffman to the knowledge‐based organization, a series of questions is outlined to assist leaders, managers and workers in the improvement of emotional intelligence awareness and the utilization of emotional intelligence as an organizational development process.

Findings

Knowledge‐based organizations may benefit from the utilization of behaviors most often attributed to emotional intelligence, and emotional intelligence may be redefined as a process rather than an outcome for organizational development.

Originality/value

The knowledge working environment must utilize innovative processes to maintain the engagement and effectiveness of the workforce. Applying emotional intelligence as an organizational development process rather than an outcome, it becomes a strategy for the development of the individual and the organization concurrently rather than treating them as opposing interests.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

L. Melita Prati, Ceasar Douglas, Gerald R. Ferris, Anthony P. Ammeter and M. Ronald Buckley

Prati, Douglas, Ferris, Ammeter, and Buckley (2003) have proposed that emotional intelligence is a critical component in effective team leadership and team outcomes. John…

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Abstract

Prati, Douglas, Ferris, Ammeter, and Buckley (2003) have proposed that emotional intelligence is a critical component in effective team leadership and team outcomes. John Antonakis (2003) questioned whether the first claim in this article, that emotional intelligence is critical for effective team leadership, is justified. He presents six questions that illuminate his reservations. In response, the present authors attempt to answer his reservations by clarifying and explicating the reasoning behind this claim.

Details

The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

Article
Publication date: 29 June 2022

Julio César Acosta-Prado, Rodrigo Arturo Zárate-Torres, Arnold Alejandro Tafur-Mendoza, Ricardo Prada-Ospina and Claudia Fabiola Rey Sarmiento

While the relationship between some leadership styles and emotional intelligence has been studied, leadership practices and emotional intelligence have not been studied…

Abstract

Purpose

While the relationship between some leadership styles and emotional intelligence has been studied, leadership practices and emotional intelligence have not been studied for an understanding of how both variables enable a leader to look for pathways to goal attainment. This study aims to examine the impact of leadership practices on pathways to goal attainment while considering the mediating effect of emotional intelligence.

Design/methodology/approach

This study was empirical with an associative strategy. The type of study was explanatory, and latent variables design was followed. The sample consists of 496 Colombian managers, obtained through a non-probability sampling (purposive sample), who work in companies located in Bogota, Colombia. For measuring the variables, three instruments were used, Leadership Practices Inventory, Adult Dispositional Hope Scale and Wong and Law Emotional Intelligence Scale.

Findings

Results from this study suggest that the relationship between leadership practices (model the way, inspire a shared vision and enable others to act) and pathways to goal attainment is mediated by emotional intelligence. Also, leadership practices and emotional intelligence explained 45.60% of the variability of the pathways to goal attainment.

Originality/value

The effectiveness of leadership practices can be explained through the hope they have about the future by using emotional intelligence as an influencing strategy. This study aims to explain how emotional intelligence helps leaders to look for pathways to goal attainment.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 31 May 2022

Kujtim Hameli and Güven Ordun

This study examines the relationship between emotional intelligence, self-efficacy and organizational commitment, focusing on the mediating role of self-efficacy in the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the relationship between emotional intelligence, self-efficacy and organizational commitment, focusing on the mediating role of self-efficacy in the relationship between emotional intelligence and organizational commitment.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used an online survey to collect data for this purpose. The sample consisted of 145 employees of different organizations in Kosovo. To test the hypothetical model, a mediation analysis was conducted using PROCESS Model Type 4.

Findings

The results show that emotional intelligence is positively related to self-efficacy and that self-efficacy is positively related to organizational commitment. Furthermore, the results of the mediation analysis confirm that the relationship between emotional intelligence and organizational commitment is mediated by self-efficacy.

Research limitations/implications

For future research, the authors recommend using the sub-dimensions of the above variables to test this model, and multiple models could be formulated. At the same time, the survey can be applied to managers to examine their emotional intelligence and to determine whether emotional intelligence influences their organizational commitment through self-efficacy. Consistent with the findings of this study, managers and executives in organizations should consider the emotional intelligence of their employees and that the employees with higher emotional intelligence have higher self-efficacy and can perform better.

Originality/value

This study extends the current literature in organizational behavior and provides a comprehensive understanding of the relationship between emotional intelligence, self-efficacy and organizational commitment. This study was also conducted in a developing country context, which can always lead to different results than studies conducted in developed countries.

Details

European Journal of Management Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2183-4172

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 9 May 2022

A. Jenifer Arokia Selvi and B. Aiswarya

The study aimed to assess the relationship between emotional intelligence and work engagement among employees of automobile sectors in Chennai, Tamil Nadu, South India and…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aimed to assess the relationship between emotional intelligence and work engagement among employees of automobile sectors in Chennai, Tamil Nadu, South India and also to find out various demographic factors of subordinates who are able to engage vigorously, meaningfully and committedly on their work through their emotional intelligence.

Design/methodology/approach

A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted, and 184 employees were recruited through random sampling to take part in the study. A Google Form questionnaire consisting of the demographic questionnaire, Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES) and Emotional Intelligence Scale (EIS) was constructed and sent via e-mail to the employees, and the data were collected; after the data cleaning process, it was analysed through SPSS Version 20 using Independent t-test, ANOVA and Pearson's correlation.

Findings

The results showed that educational qualification and income significantly influenced work engagement in all dimensions, while gender, designation, and work experience partially influenced work engagement. It showed a strong correlation between work engagement and emotional intelligence.

Research limitations/implications

This study assessed a small number of employees due to which the external validity reduces, and it assessed only the interplay between different dimensions of work engagement and emotional intelligence but not linked with any other mediating factors. The final sample size of the present study was relatively small due to the time constraint; hence, the study yielded less accurate results. Some linking variables, such as job security, motivation, knowledge management and transformational leadership, can be added to find out the association of emotional intelligence and work engagement and to understand how the factors influence each other.

Practical implications

For every output in the organisation, the work engagement or performance, there is an emotion behind each and every individual. The person cannot put his/her whole effort at work and concentrate without his/her self-awareness and management; at the same time, socialising is also very important to maintain good relationships at work; without these influences, one cannot have engagement in his/her work, which ultimately leads to  job satisfaction. It improves the strong attitude and behaviour that intend to be engaged at work.

Social implications

This study would benefit in focusing more on rewards and recognition, empowering employees and building a bond between the organisation and employees in a strategic manner. The management can utilise the employee's engagement and make various financial outcomes, such as profitability, growth, increase the share value and the turnover of the procuctivity. It improves the communication between business leaders and the organisation that benefits the business practices to be more effective which leads to a positive social change. Employee engagement strategies could fill the gap between employees' job involvement and the productive outcome. On the whole, employees' work engagement makes them to invest themselves wholeheartedly into cognitively, physically and emotionally on the job.

Originality/value

Work engagement and emotional intelligence, as well as their dimensions, illustrate a clear relationship and are also shown to be predictive of each other in the workplace.

Details

Rajagiri Management Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0972-9968

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 8 August 2017

Terri Summey

To explore the feasibility of utilizing the Bar-On mixed model of emotional–social intelligence as a framework for the competencies and traits needed for reference and…

Abstract

To explore the feasibility of utilizing the Bar-On mixed model of emotional–social intelligence as a framework for the competencies and traits needed for reference and information services librarians. Through a survey of the literature, the author created a baseline list of competencies, which was compared and contrasted with the abilities, traits, and competencies that comprise the Bar-On model of emotional–social intelligence. The author conducted a pilot study with a small group (n = 10) of reference and user services librarians who took the EQ-i 2.0. The competencies and traits of reference and user services librarians identified in the literature compare favorably with those measured by the EQ-i 2.0. Overall, a majority of the participants (70%) obtained a total score on the EQ-i 2.0 in the mid or high range. Composite scales with the highest overall mean scores were decision-making and self-perception. Subscales with the highest scores included the following: impulse control, self-actualization, social responsibility, problem solving, and reality testing. As a pilot study, it was conducted using a small population of academic reference and user services librarians. Further research should be conducted utilizing a larger population of reference and user services librarians or librarians who have been recognized as exemplary in reference librarianship. The findings of this study could assist pre-service and in-service reference and user services librarians in further developing their emotional–social intelligence competencies and abilities by identifying areas where improvements could occur.

Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2003

Neal M Ashkanasy, Claire E Ashton-James and Peter J Jordan

We review the literature on stress in organizational settings and, based on a model of job insecurity and emotional intelligence by Jordan, Ashkanasy and Härtel (2002)…

Abstract

We review the literature on stress in organizational settings and, based on a model of job insecurity and emotional intelligence by Jordan, Ashkanasy and Härtel (2002), present a new model where affective responses associated with stress mediate the impact of workplace stressors on individual and organizational performance outcomes. Consistent with Jordan et al., emotional intelligence is a key moderating variable. In our model, however, the components of emotional intelligence are incorporated into the process of stress appraisal and coping. The chapter concludes with a discussion of the implications of these theoretical developments for understanding emotional and behavioral responses to workplace.

Details

Emotional and Physiological Processes and Positive Intervention Strategies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-238-2

Book part
Publication date: 26 August 2019

Marie T. Dasborough

This study seeks to examine how follower’s emotional intelligence influences their emotional reactions to leadership.

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to examine how follower’s emotional intelligence influences their emotional reactions to leadership.

Design/Methodology/Approach

Data were collected at two points in time. First, I assessed the emotional intelligence of 157 participants in a laboratory setting. Then, a few weeks later, an experiment manipulating leadership behavior was conducted with same participants. After viewing the leader, the participants’ emotional reactions to their attributions of the leader’s behavior were assessed.

Findings

In line with expectations, emotional intelligence was associated with different emotional responses to attributions for the leader’s behavior. Specifically, participants lower on emotional intelligence had more extreme emotional responses to the leader than their more highly emotionally intelligent counterparts.

Research Limitations/Implications

Although emotional intelligence has received a lot of scholarly attention with regard to predicting performance and leadership emergence, we need to learn more about how it influences emotional responses at work.

Practical Implications

If emotional intelligence helps promote less extreme emotional reactions at work, emotional skills should be developed in employees.

Originality/Value

This study is the first to examine emotional intelligence as a moderator of emotional reactions to attributions of leadership charisma and intent.

Details

Emotions and Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-202-7

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 26 September 2005

Abraham Carmeli and Sidika Nihal Colakoglu

Theory suggests that affective commitment and organizational citizenship behavior are positively correlated. Previous studies, however, report weak relationships between…

Abstract

Theory suggests that affective commitment and organizational citizenship behavior are positively correlated. Previous studies, however, report weak relationships between affective commitment and organizational citizenship behavior. The present study provides an interactive perspective in which we propose that emotional intelligence moderates the relationship between affective commitment and Organizational Citizenship Behaviors (OCBs) – altruism and compliance. We found significant interaction between emotional intelligence and affective commitment in predicting altruistic behavior. In other words, the positive relationship between affective commitment and OCB-altruism was stronger for high emotional intelligence individuals. Our prediction for compliance behavior was not supported.

Details

The Effect of Affect in Organizational Settings
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-234-4

Book part
Publication date: 18 July 2007

Frank Walter and Heike Bruch

The relevance of affective factors in the charismatic leadership process has been widely acknowledged in leadership research. Building on this notion, the present study…

Abstract

The relevance of affective factors in the charismatic leadership process has been widely acknowledged in leadership research. Building on this notion, the present study empirically investigated the role of leaders’ positive mood and emotional intelligence in the development of charismatic leadership behaviors. We developed hypotheses linking these constructs and tested them in a sample of 34 leaders and their 165 direct followers from a multinational corporation. Results showed that both leaders’ positive mood and leaders’ emotional intelligence were positively related to their charismatic leadership behaviors, as rated by followers. Further, we found leaders’ emotional intelligence to moderate the relationship between leaders’ positive mood and their charismatic leadership behaviors. Emotionally intelligent leaders exhibited charismatic leadership behaviors to a high extent, largely irrespective of their degree of positive mood. In contrast, leaders low on emotional intelligence were more likely to exhibit charismatic behaviors when their positive mood was high, while they were less likely to exhibit such behaviors when their positive mood was low. We conclude by discussing the implications of these findings for leadership theory, research, and practice.

Details

Functionality, Intentionality and Morality
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1414-0

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