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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2020

Hannah Zeilig, Brioney Gee, Bonnie Teague, Jonathan Wilson and Corinna Hackmann

This paper aims to highlight the critical importance of the perspectives of mental health service-users during the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to highlight the critical importance of the perspectives of mental health service-users during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

This viewpoint is based on a review of recent research and literature and draws on consultations with experts by experience, including the lead author.

Findings

The authors argue that expertise-by-experience is critical to policy, service development and research; but there is a risk it will be neglected at a time of rapid and reactive clinical development.

Research limitations/implications

Understanding and responding to the nuances of individual need can only be achieved through coproducing service strategy design, delivery and research with mental health service users. The consultation outlined in this viewpoint gives some indication of the type of valuable insights that can be gained through seeking and listening to the perspectives of experts by experience.

Originality/value

The discussions revealed that experience of managing severe and complex mental health conditions can actually be advantageous when facing a crisis such as COVID-19.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Noha M. El-Bassiouny, Jonathan A.J. Wilson and Suzan Esmat

The purpose of this paper is to present a new conceptualization of sustainability. The authors adopt a macromarketing perspective based on Islamic traditions while delving into…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a new conceptualization of sustainability. The authors adopt a macromarketing perspective based on Islamic traditions while delving into divine attributes (AsmaaAllah-ul-Husna) as an extension to the foundational principle of God-consciousness that lies at the heart of Islamic theology and jurisprudence.

Design/methodology/approach

This approach relies on identifying and extending the conceptual overlaps between the literature domains of sustainability, Islamic macromarketing and Islamic theology.

Findings

Through adopting an Islamic lens, the authors identify that relating to divinity empowers the Muslim faithful to mediate between the transient and transcendent, and to make judgments according to the attributes of their creator Allah (the Abrahamic monotheistic God).

Research limitations/implications

The paper adopts a conceptual approach that expands the concept of sustainability from an Islamic perspective to take on a holistic systems approach.

Practical implications

By making these links, the implications are fivefold: the imperative to strive for sustainable activities has greater resonance; the remit of sustainability is wider; the time horizon for accountability is extended; greater risk-tasking is encouraged; and, finally, sustainability is embedded and diffused throughout business activities – as opposed to being an upstream strategic objective.

Social implications

The merge in conceptualization between sustainability and Islamic macromarketing can prove relevant to scholars delving into the new realm of Islamic macromarketing, as well as to both Muslim and non-Muslim communities in their quest for sustainable development.

Originality/value

The paper is original in identifying an unprecedented perspective on sustainability, namely, “Islamic-macromarketing sustainability”, which warrants further future research related to the different stakeholders involved in the Islamic macromarketing system.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 February 2020

David Heavens, Joanne Hodgekins, Rebecca Lower, Joanne Spauls, Benjamin Carroll, Brioney Gee, Timothy Clarke and Jonathan Wilson

There is an international drive to improve mental health services for young people. This study aims to investigate service user experience of a youth mental health service in…

Abstract

Purpose

There is an international drive to improve mental health services for young people. This study aims to investigate service user experience of a youth mental health service in Norfolk, UK. In addition to suggesting improvements to this service, recommendations are made for the development of youth mental health services in general.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed-methods approach was used. Quantitative data from satisfaction questionnaires were analysed using descriptive statistics and compared between two time points. A semi-structured interview was used to generate qualitative data. Thematic analysis was used to identify themes in the interview transcripts and triangulation was used to synthesise quantitative and qualitative data.

Findings

Service users appeared satisfied with the service. Significant improvements in satisfaction were found between two time points. Qualitative analysis identified three main themes that were important to service users, including support, information and personhood.

Practical implications

Recommendations for the development of youth mental health services are provided. Although these are based on findings from the Norfolk youth service, they are likely to apply to other mental health services for young people.

Originality/value

Mental health care for young people requires significant improvement. The Norfolk youth service is one of the first services of its kind in the UK. The findings from this study might be helpful to consider in the development of youth mental health services across the world.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 August 2021

Jonathan A.J. Wilson and Nihal I.A. Ayad

This paper explores reasons behind Muslim fervour, in response to advertisements that cause them offence – where marketing promotions and brands are seen to contradict or…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper explores reasons behind Muslim fervour, in response to advertisements that cause them offence – where marketing promotions and brands are seen to contradict or challenge the tenets of their religion (Islam) and culture.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors investigate Egyptian Muslim Millennials’ perceptions post 2011 Egyptian Arab Spring revolution qualitatively – through a series of iterative focus groups, diaries, and laddered coding procedures.

Findings

In contrast to the way in which media stories regularly highlight this phenomenon locally, internationally, and inside and outside of the Muslim world, we find that the landscape is more cultural, contextual, dynamic, politicised, and subtle. In addition, religiosity may not in fact be the determining factor and its presence is much more nuanced. The socially mobile, educated, and digitally connected Egyptian Muslim millennial demographic, that grabbed headlines during the Arab Spring for their influence, were found in this study to describe offence as being annoying or provocative advertisements where the message, theme or execution disregards their intelligence. Furthermore, parents, access to basic utilities, and having a stable living environment command a greater influence than religiosity for them. Finally, an environmental paradox exists, where restricted living conditions juxtaposed in parallel with escapism offered by social-media consumption, leads millennials towards being more accepting of advertising that could be classified as offensive.

Practical implications

This study is of value for researchers, educators, and professionals in the fields of advertising, marketing communications, consumer behaviour, and sociology.

Social implications

The observations raise questions concerning how the media reports stories, or advertisers conduct their campaigns – as to whether they are representative, motivated by sociopolitics or propaganda, an intended tactic, highlight unintended poor execution, ambivalence, or part of a wider phenomenon.

Originality/value

The authors present a new dual-process personality/religiosity conceptual model – designed to explain the stepwise process of Muslim opinion-forming, behaviour, and consumption of advertisements. Furthermore, we illustrate this with a supporting allegory the authors call a “Narnia paradigm”, drawing from C.S. Lewis’s fictional story “The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe”.

Article
Publication date: 11 January 2023

Lamiya Samad, Bonnie Teague, Khalifa Elzubeir, Karen Moreira, Nita Agarwal, Sophie Bagge, Emma Marriott and Jonathan Wilson

This paper aims to evaluate service user (SU) and clinician acceptability of video care, including future preferences to inform mental health practice during COVID-19, and beyond.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to evaluate service user (SU) and clinician acceptability of video care, including future preferences to inform mental health practice during COVID-19, and beyond.

Design/methodology/approach

Structured questionnaires were co-developed with SUs and clinicians. The SU online experience questionnaire was built into video consultations (VCs) via the Attend Anywhere platform, completed between July 2020 and March 2021. A Trust-wide clinician experience survey was conducted between July and October 2020. Chi-squared test was performed for any differences in clinician VC rating by mental health difficulties, with the content analysis used for free-text data.

Findings

Of 1,275 SUs completing the questionnaire following VC, most felt supported (93.4%), and their needs were met (90%). For future appointments, 51.8% of SUs preferred video, followed by face-to-face (33%), with COVID-related and practical reasons given. Of 249 clinicians, 161 (64.7%) had used VCs. Most felt the therapeutic relationship (76.4%) and privacy (78.7%) were maintained. Clinicians felt confident about clinical assessment and management using video. However, they were less confident in assessing psychotic symptoms and initiating psychotropic medications. There were no significant differences in clinician VC rating by mental health difficulties. For future, more SUs preferred using video, with a quarter providing practical reasons.

Originality/value

The study provides a real-world example of video care implementation. In addition to highlighting clinician needs, support at the wider system/policy level, with a focus on addressing inequalities, can inform mental health care beyond COVID-19.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 August 2021

Nael Alqtati, Jonathan A.J. Wilson and Varuna De Silva

This paper aims to equip professionals and researchers in the fields of advertising, branding, public relations, marketing communications, social media analytics and marketing…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to equip professionals and researchers in the fields of advertising, branding, public relations, marketing communications, social media analytics and marketing with a simple, effective and dynamic means of evaluating consumer behavioural sentiments and engagement through Arabic language and script, in vivo.

Design/methodology/approach

Using quantitative and qualitative situational linguistic analyses of Classical Arabic, found in Quranic and religious texts scripts; Modern Standard Arabic, which is commonly used in formal Arabic channels; and dialectical Arabic, which varies hugely from one Arabic country to another: this study analyses rich marketing and consumer messages (tweets) – as a basis for developing an Arabic language social media methodological tool.

Findings

Despite the popularity of Arabic language communication on social media platforms across geographies, currently, comprehensive language processing toolkits for analysing Arabic social media conversations have limitations and require further development. Furthermore, due to its unique morphology, developing text understanding capabilities specific to the Arabic language poses challenges.

Practical implications

This study demonstrates the application and effectiveness of the proposed methodology on a random sample of Twitter data from Arabic-speaking regions. Furthermore, as Arabic is the language of Islam, the study is of particular importance to Islamic and Muslim geographies, markets and marketing.

Social implications

The findings suggest that the proposed methodology has a wider potential beyond the data set and health-care sector analysed, and therefore, can be applied to further markets, social media platforms and consumer segments.

Originality/value

To remedy these gaps, this study presents a new methodology and analytical approach to investigating Arabic language social media conversations, which brings together a multidisciplinary knowledge of technology, data science and marketing communications.

Article
Publication date: 14 June 2022

Lei Xie, Jonathan Wilson and Todd Sherron

The empirical findings of the roles of emotions in teams are mixed. This study, a scoping literature review, aims to synthesize extant research on the roles of emotions in work…

Abstract

Purpose

The empirical findings of the roles of emotions in teams are mixed. This study, a scoping literature review, aims to synthesize extant research on the roles of emotions in work teams and offers future research directions.

Design/methodology/approach

Sixty-nine empirical studies from the past ten years (2012 to 2021) were identified and reviewed. The authors then analyzed these 69 papers based on their research design, focus and nomological network of emotions.

Findings

The authors found that there is a clear increasing research trend of studying emotions in a team setting. In the extant literature, team emotions were studied from three major perspectives: emotions, emotional management and emotion measurement. The authors also summarized findings into the nomological network of team emotions. Last but not least, future research directions regarding the research context, focus and design and analysis were recommended.

Originality/value

The role of emotions in teams has not been extensively reviewed or synthesized, and the empirical findings are mixed. This paper synthesized the role of emotions in teams and critical factors that affect emotions in teams. In particular, the research recommendations for critical human resource development scholars cover three aspects: research context advancement, research focus advancement and research design and analysis advancement.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 47 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 February 2022

Noha El-Bassiouny, Yasmin Anwar Abdou, Dina El-Bassiouny, Ahmad Jamal and Jonathan Wilson

This paper aims to examine practical wisdom from the Islamic religion elaborating on how it pertains to the sustainability mind-set. The purpose is to assess whether the Islamic…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine practical wisdom from the Islamic religion elaborating on how it pertains to the sustainability mind-set. The purpose is to assess whether the Islamic and sustainability mind-sets coincide and if so, how they do.

Design/methodology/approach

The first two chapters of the Holy Qur’an were divided into parts based on the divisions in the exegesis by Abu Bakr Al-Jaza’eri. Next, a qualitative content analysis of the main sustainability themes in these chapters was conducted. The first stage of the content analysis involved the collection of Qur’anic verses related to the sustainability concepts. Following that, inductive interpretive analysis was conducted in the second stage of the content analysis, where key sustainability lessons within the agreed upon Qur’anic verses were extracted.

Findings

The empirical study reported in this paper reveals 10 lessons from the examined Qur’anic text that pertain to the sustainability mind-set. Each of these lessons appears to foretell the wisdom behind the sustainability mind-set.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature on sustainability and Islam in two ways. First, the analysis results in key lessons relating to sustainability, the majority of which were not covered in existing literature. Second, the research takes a holistic approach to finding commonalities between the sustainability mind-set and the Islamic mind-set, instead of focusing on a specific aspect of sustainability such as the environment.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 June 2023

Sajad Farokhi, Farshid Namamian, Ali Asghari Sarem and Tohfe Ghobadi Lamuki

This study aims to explain the model of impulsive purchase behavior in the Islamic Republic of Iran’s tourism industry.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explain the model of impulsive purchase behavior in the Islamic Republic of Iran’s tourism industry.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses the inductive–deductive approach for data collection. Field (interviews) and library (articles, books and theses) methods have been used for data collection. After determining the research variables, content analysis units (theme, category and markers) are specified. Academic experts and professionals in the subject area helped during the model design stage.

Findings

The results reveal 14 visual attention variables which are classified into four categories: attractiveness in the market, emotional reactions, improving the shopping style of tourists and visual advertising.

Research limitations/implications

This study focuses only on Iran. There is scope to expand the discussion with more interviews. The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on tourism presented some unique challenges in participant recruitment. Future studies could focus on other Middle Eastern countries or other international areas. Moreover, future researchers could analyze other variables affecting impulsive purchase.

Originality/value

No other studies on tourism industry marketing have recognized the effective variables in impulsive purchase. To fill this gap, this paper explains the visual attention model in tourists’ impulsive purchase behavior.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 March 2013

Jonathan A.J. Wilson, Russell W. Belk, Gary J. Bamossy, Özlem Sandikci, Hermawan Kartajaya, Rana Sobh, Jonathan Liu and Linda Scott

The purpose of this paper is to bring together the thoughts and opinions of key members of the Journal of Islamic Marketing's (JIMA) Editorial Team, regarding the recently branded…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to bring together the thoughts and opinions of key members of the Journal of Islamic Marketing's (JIMA) Editorial Team, regarding the recently branded phenomenon of Islamic marketing – in the interests of stimulating further erudition.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors adopted an “eagle eye” method to investigate this phenomenon: Where attempts were made to frame general principles and observations; alongside a swooping view of key anecdotal observations – in order to ground and enrich the study. The authors participated in an iterative process when analysing longitudinal and contemporary phenomenological data, in order to arrive at a consensus. This was grounded in: triangulating individual and collective researcher findings; critiquing relevant published material; and reflecting upon known reviewed manuscripts submitted to marketing publications – both successful and unsuccessful.

Findings

The authors assert that a key milestone in the study and practice of marketing, branding, consumer behaviour and consumption in connection with Islam and Muslims is the emergence of research wherein the terms “Islamic marketing” and “Islamic branding” have evolved – of which JIMA is also a by‐product. Some have construed Islam marketing/branding as merely a niche area. Given the size of Muslim populations globally and the critical importance of understanding Islam in the context of business and practices with local, regional and international ramifications, scholarship on Islamic marketing has become essential. Western commerce and scholarship has been conducted to a limited extent, and some evidence exists that research is occurring globally. The authors believe it is vital for “Islamic marketing” scholarship to move beyond simply raising the flag of “Brand Islam” and the consideration of Muslim geographies to a point where Islam – as a way of life, a system of beliefs and practices, and religious and social imperatives – is amply explored.

Research limitations/implications

An “eagle eye” view has been taken, which balances big picture and grassroots conceptual findings. The topic is complex – and so while diverse expert opinions are cited, coverage of many issues is necessarily brief, due to space constraints.

Practical implications

Scholars and practitioners alike should find the thoughts contained in the paper of significant interest. Ultimately, scholarship of Islam's influences on marketing theory and practice should lead to results which have pragmatic implications, just as research on Islamic banking and finance has.

Originality/value

The paper appears to be the first to bring together such a diverse set of expert opinions within one body of work, and one that provides a forum for experts to reflect and comment on peers' views, through iteration. Also the term Crescent marketing is introduced to highlight how critical cultural factors are, which shape perceptions and Islamic practises.

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