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Article
Publication date: 9 July 2020

Alamira Samah Saleh

Like many social media trends, the romantic craze charms Egyptian youth. Romantic Facebook crush pages popped up locally in the past few years among university students…

Abstract

Purpose

Like many social media trends, the romantic craze charms Egyptian youth. Romantic Facebook crush pages popped up locally in the past few years among university students particularly. They expressed a new aspect of online social interaction that has raised red flags with some adults, while thought to be a new healthy way to pour youth’s hearts out anonymously in a so-called a conservative society for others. Some crush pages, in particular, drew concerns of several parents for they are more vulgar and aggressive submissions. Laying between the two arguments, this study aims to examine the extent to which Facebook users make use of it to pursue romance, if Facebook’s characteristics and social context reflected in users’ perceptions of romantic relationships, the implications of being in a romantic relationship on Facebook and if such FB practices could pose a state of moral panic or a public concern.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of 200 Facebook users between 18 and 25 years was gathered. Furthermore, a content analysis of three Egyptian universities’ “crush pages” posts was applied.

Findings

The study highlighted the conflicting ideals of today’s Egyptian youth moral lives. Ultimately, there is an evidence that practices of using Facebook online crush pages have been creating new contested but delightful moral normative rules around love.

Originality/value

Crushes pages have been sweeping across Egyptian colleges and faculties; however, almost no Arabic study was done to figure out its impact. Furthermore, the study takes into account the socio-cultural background of the Egyptian society.

Details

Journal of Humanities and Applied Social Sciences, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2632-279X

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Christopher Adam Bagley and Nader Al-Refai

The purpose of this paper is to review and synthesize published studies and practice in the “integration” of ethnic and religious minorities in Britain and The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review and synthesize published studies and practice in the “integration” of ethnic and religious minorities in Britain and The Netherlands, 1965-2015, drawing out implications for current policy and practice.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is an evaluative review and report of results of work on citizenship education for young Muslims and their peers in English schools.

Findings

Young Muslims have positive attitudes to “good citizenship”, as Islamic socialization makes them particularly responsive to citizenship messages. But there is hard-core racial prejudice and Islamophobia in about 25 per cent of adults. In The Netherlands, this xenophobia has supported far-right politicians who are strongly anti-Muslim. This paper cites evidence that continued prejudice may lead to alienation and radicalization of some minorities.

Research limitations/implications

Unchecked prejudice concerning minorities can have negative implications for both majority and minority groups this broad hypothesis deserves further research in both Dutch and British societies.

Practical implications

In Britain, success in Muslim schools in fostering positive citizenship implies that Muslim groups can maintain “quiet dignity” in following Islamic pathways to good citizenship.

Social implications

State support for religious-foundation schools should be offered to all religious groups and should not be withheld from Muslim minorities for “security” reasons.

Originality/value

This overview by two Muslim educators offers new insights and proposals in the acceptance of Muslim minorities in Europe.

Details

Journal for Multicultural Education, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-535X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2012

Fodil Fadli

Over more than thirty years of violent conflict, Northern Ireland had an intense sectarian violence due to the political-religious opposition between its Catholic and…

Abstract

Over more than thirty years of violent conflict, Northern Ireland had an intense sectarian violence due to the political-religious opposition between its Catholic and Protestant communities. The history of the Muslim community in Northern Ireland and the nature of the events in the region have had implications on the establishment of an Islamic environment. This paper aims to explore the problems encountered by the Muslim community in Northern Ireland in their attempt to build their first purpose built mosque. The paper is based on data collected during a study conducted between 2005 and 2007. However, a more recent literature review has been conducted. The study investigates the establishment of Islamic spaces, architecture and symbols. It explores the ways developed by the Muslim community in order to conceptualize and establish their first purpose-built mosque in Northern Ireland, but it also investigates how Muslim adapt and modify their domestic and communal spaces for their cultural, religious and identity needs and concerns. This paper offers an understanding of why the Muslim community needs to build its first formal-built-purpose mosque in Northern Ireland, and how the members of this community adapt to continuously changing liminal spaces.

Details

Open House International, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 6 April 2010

Paul R. Baines, Nicholas J. O'Shaughnessy, Kevin Moloney, Barry Richards, Sara Butler and Mark Gill

The purpose of this paper is to discuss exploratory research into the perceptions of British Muslims towards Islamist ideological messaging to contribute to the general…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss exploratory research into the perceptions of British Muslims towards Islamist ideological messaging to contribute to the general debate on “radicalisation”.

Design/methodology/approach

Four focus groups were undertaken with a mixture of Bangladeshi and Pakistani British Muslims who were shown a selection of Islamist propaganda media clips, garnered from the internet.

Findings

The paper proposess that Islamist communications focus on eliciting change in emotional states, specifically inducing the paratelic‐excitement mode, by focusing around a meta‐narrative of Muslims as a unitary grouping self‐defined as victim to Western aggression. It concludes that British Muslim respondents were unsympathetic to the Islamist ideological messaging contained in the sample of propaganda clips.

Originality/value

The paper provides an insight into how British Muslims might respond to Islamist communications, indicating that, while most are not susceptible to inducement of paratelic‐excitement, others are likely to be, dependent on which genre of clip is used, the messages contained therein, and who that clip is targeted at.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 44 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2018

Mahfuzur Rahman, Mohamed Albaity, Che Ruhana Isa and Nurul Azma

This study aims to concern with Malaysian consumer involvement in fashion clothing. To achieve this, materialism, fashion clothing involvement and religiosity are examined…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to concern with Malaysian consumer involvement in fashion clothing. To achieve this, materialism, fashion clothing involvement and religiosity are examined as drivers of fashion clothing purchase involvement.

Design/methodology/approach

Gender, race and age are explored to have better understanding of fashion clothing purchase involvement in Malaysia. Data were gathered using a Malaysian university student sample, resulting in 281 completed questionnaires.

Findings

The results support the study’s model and its hypotheses and indicate that materialism, fashion clothing involvement and religiosity are significant drivers of fashion clothing purchase involvement. Also, materialism is a significant driver of fashion clothing involvement, and fashion clothing involvement mediates the relationship between materialism and fashion clothing purchase involvement. The results also show that Malaysian youth do not possess a high level of materialistic tendencies.

Originality/value

This study offers enormous opportunities for the international apparel marketers to formulate relevant business policies and strategies.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 28 March 2020

Tagreed Saleh Abalkhail

The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of religiosity on luxury brand consumption among Muslim women.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of religiosity on luxury brand consumption among Muslim women.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 322 women were surveyed. Data was collected in the capital city of Saudi Arabia and assessed using SEM.

Findings

The findings revealed that religion impacts consumers’ attitudes towards luxury brand consumption. A positive relationship was found between attitude towards luxury and luxury consumption. Also, attitude towards luxury mediated the relation between religiosity and luxury consumption.

Originality/value

The study’s findings serve to remind the retailers in Islamic countries to keep in mind the importance of religion in consumers’ preferences and selections.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Srinath Jagannathan, Patturaja Selvaraj and Jerome Joseph

This paper aims to show that the experience of workers on the margins of international business is akin to the funeralesque. The funeralesque is understood as the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to show that the experience of workers on the margins of international business is akin to the funeralesque. The funeralesque is understood as the appropriation of the value generated by workers across the production networks of international business.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing from the engagement with crematorium workers, the narratives of workers are articulated, describing the insecurities and injustices experienced by them. The authors draw from six-month-long qualitative engagement with seven workers in a crematorium in Ahmedabad, India.

Findings

The experience of marginal subjects provides important insights into how international business, in conjunction with states, structures inequality for marginal subjects. Precariousness, social exclusion, low wages and subjectivities of humiliation are the experiences of marginal subjects. The reproduction of marginality in globalising cities is an important element of the funeralesque through which extraction and re-distribution of value across international networks is legitimised.

Practical implications

In understanding international business as the funeralesque, the authors demystify the power relations constituted by it. The authors provide a metaphor for dethroning the legitimacy of international business and indicate that its modern practices are similar to the practices of value appropriation that occur in a funeral.

Originality/value

The authors develop the metaphor of the funeralesque to gain insights into the experiences of workers on the margins of international business. The authors are, thus, able to theorise the underbelly of globalising cities in a poetic, subversive way.

Details

critical perspectives on international business, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-2043

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Book part
Publication date: 23 November 2017

Rhys H. Williams, Courtney Ann Irby and R. Stephen Warner

The sexual lives of religious youth and young adults have been an increasing topic of interest since the rise of abstinence-only education and attendant programs in many…

Abstract

Purpose

The sexual lives of religious youth and young adults have been an increasing topic of interest since the rise of abstinence-only education and attendant programs in many religious institutions. But while we know a lot about individual-level rates of sexual behavior, far less is known about how religious organizations shape and mediate sexuality. We draw on data from observations with youth and young adult ministries and interviews with religious young adults and adult leaders from Muslim, Hindu, and Protestant Christian groups in order to examine how religious adults in positions of organizational authority work to manage the gender and sexual developments in the transition to adulthood among their youth. We find three distinct organizational styles across the various religious traditions: avoidance through gender segregation, self-restraint supplemented with peer surveillance, and a classed disengagement. In each of these organizational responses, gender and sexuality represent something that must be explained and controlled in the process of cultivating the proper adult religious disposition. The paper examines how religious congregations and other religious organizations oriented toward youth, work to manage the gender and sexual developments in their youth’s transitions to adulthood. The paper draws from a larger project that is studying the lived processes of religious transmission between generations.

Methodology/approach

Data were extracted from (a) ethnographic observations of youth programming at religious organizations; (b) ethnographicobservations with families during their religious observances; (c) interviews with adult leaders of youth ministry programs. The sample includes Protestant Christian, Muslim, and Hindu organizations and families.

Findings

The paper presents three organizational approaches toward managing sex and instilling appropriate gender ideas: (a) prescribed avoidance, in which young men and women are segregated in many religious and educational settings and encouraged to moderate any cross-gender contact in public; (b) self-restraint supplemented with peer surveillance, in which young people are repeatedly encouraged not only to learn to control themselves through internal moral codes but also to enlist their peers to monitor each other’s conduct and call them to account for violations of those codes; and (c) “classed” disengagement, in which organizations comprised of highly educated, middle-class families do little to address sex directly, but treat it as but one aspect of developing individual ethical principles that will assist their educational and class mobility.

Research limitations/implications

While the comparative sample in this paper is a strength, other religious traditions than the ones studied may have other practices. The ethnographic nature of the research provides in-depth understandings of the organizational practices, but cannot comment on how representative these practices are across regions, organizations, or faiths.

Originality/value

Most studies of religion and youth sex and sexuality either rely on individual-level data from surveys, or study the discourses and ideologies found in books, movies, and the like. They do not study the “mechanisms,” in either religious organizations or families, through which messages are communicated and enacted. Our examination of organizational and familial practices shows sex and gender communication in action. Further, most existing research has focused on Christians, wherein we have a comparative sample of Protestant Christians, Muslims, and Hindus.

Details

Gender, Sex, and Sexuality Among Contemporary Youth
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-613-6

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Dalia Abdelrahman Farrag and Mohammed Hassan

– The purpose of this paper is to measure the impact of the different religiosity dimensions on the attitude of Muslim youth towards fashion.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to measure the impact of the different religiosity dimensions on the attitude of Muslim youth towards fashion.

Design/methodology/approach

To understand the relationship between religiosity and Muslim youths’ attitude towards fashion, a structured questionnaire was circulated amongst university students in Cairo and Alexandria (Egypt’s two largest cities) using convenience sampling method. Religiosity has been measured using the operationalized definition by Glock (1972), as consisting of five different dimensions: ideological, Intellectual, ritualistic, experimental and consequential. Likert scales were used to measure religiosity dimensions, and semantic differential scale has been used to measure the attitude of Muslim youth towards fashion. An initial sample size of 350 Egyptian Muslim youth was surveyed on-campus using face-to-face method by a group of volunteer trainer students.

Findings

Cronbach’s alpha has been measured for all variables to ensure internal consistency. The findings provide evidence that a negative relationship exists with all of the religiosity dimensions under study and attitude of youth towards fashion. More specifically, the intellectual and consequential dimensions had the strongest negative significant relationships with attitude of youth towards fashion.

Research limitations/implications

The results of this study should be considered in light of a number of limitations on which recommendations for future research are based. First, the use of a student sample, even if these consumers are important and justified for this research, may hinder the generalizability of the findings across other segments of consumers who might behave differently. Second, this study relies on the declared attitudes of the respondents, which are likely to be biased because of respondents’ inclination to give socially desirable answers and spiritually peace reactions. Such an evaluation cannot identify unconscious attitudes and behaviours.

Practical implications

The paper’s interesting findings serve to remind entrepreneurs and marketers in general that they cannot neglect the element of religion in their marketing activities, particularly in the fashion industry and the development of apparel targeting Muslim women. Such an understanding will help both marketers in designing their marketing practices according to their Muslim consumers’ convictions, and academicians in their research endeavours.

Originality/value

Investigating and measuring the influence of religion in general and Islam in particular on youth’s attitude towards fashion is considered a very contemporary and raw topic that shall have significant contribution to the existing literature, as well as to fashion designers and marketers.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Anna Vassadis, Ameera Karimshah, Anita Harris and Youssef Youssef

The purpose of this paper is to draw on the authors’ experiences as a team made up of both “insiders” and “outsiders” in order to investigate how an insider-outsider peer…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to draw on the authors’ experiences as a team made up of both “insiders” and “outsiders” in order to investigate how an insider-outsider peer research method facilitates productive forms of research into the lives of young Muslims, and to contribute to debates about ways of knowing youth. The authors aim to shift focus from a common claim that peer research methods simply improve research about youth to more deeply investigate how they enable, as well as limit, the production of particular kinds of knowledge, in this case, about Muslim youth in Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

The research aimed to explore how “ordinary” young Australian Muslims engage in civic life. Yet the authors were faced with the challenge of accessing and recruiting “ordinary” youth in times of Islamophobia, wherein Muslim communities expressed serious concerns about their voices being misinterpreted, misused and misappropriated. Therefore, the authors sought to utilise an approach of outsider-designed and guided research that was then shaped and executed by insider peer researchers. It is this research design and its execution that the authors interrogate in this paper.

Findings

As well as affording the authors access and the elicitation of rich, complex and high-quality data, the approach also fostered more complex stories about young Muslim identities and experiences, and enabled the authors to contest some common and homogenising representations. It also allowed opportunities for fundamental issues inherent in these kinds of qualitative research methods to be made explicit. These include the politics of performativity and issues of positionality in the peer research process. The authors suggest that the “insider” and “outsider” approach succeeded not so much because it got the authors closer to the “truth” about young Muslims’ civic lives, but because it revealed some of the mechanics of the ways stories are constructed and represented in youth research.

Originality/value

The originality and value of this paper lie in its contribution to a debate about the politics of knowledge production about young people and Muslims in particular, and in its effort to move forward a discussion about how to be accountable in youth research to the various communities and to one another in insider-outsider research teams.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

Keywords

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