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1 – 10 of over 2000
Article
Publication date: 11 October 2022

Aamir Jamal, Liza Lorenzetti, Swati Dhingra, Clive Baldwin and Heather Ganshorn

Our thematic analysis of the academic literature on Canadian Muslim Youth aims to identify and describe the factors which contribute to the construction of identity among…

Abstract

Purpose

Our thematic analysis of the academic literature on Canadian Muslim Youth aims to identify and describe the factors which contribute to the construction of identity among Muslim youth in Canada and make some research and policy recommendations to address this issue. In this review, we responded to the following questions: What is the current research evidence for Canadian Muslim Youth identity construction? What are the major themes included in the identified publications?

Design/methodology/approach

What does it mean to be a Muslim youth in Canada and how do Canadian Muslim youth negotiate and construct their identities in a globally polarized world? Using Arksey and O'Malley's framework (2005), a scoping review of empirical studies published between 2000 and 2021 was conducted to explore the diverse contexts that intersect in the creation of Canadian Muslim youth identity.

Findings

A thematic analysis of the literature identified five key themes: religiosity, racism and discrimination, parental influence, citizenship and gender that intersect in multiple ways to contribute to the construction of diverse and complex Muslim youth identities. The scoping review highlights a gap in community-based research and the need for a broader range of theoretical perspectives on Muslim youth identity construction, as well as culturally appropriate policies and social work practice models for positive youth development.

Originality/value

In contemporary Canadian culture, Muslim youth must negotiate and create their own exclusive identity, which justifies the context of what it means to be Canadian and Muslim at the same time. As highlighted in the literature, a number of tensions within the Canadian policy, between the policy and the Muslim tradition and within the Muslim community itself pose challenges in the identity development among Muslim youth. Therefore, It is critical for social work practitioners, researchers and policymakers to consider above mentioned socio-political and religious dimensions while designing, implementing and evaluating youth programs for Muslim communities.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 April 2022

Matthew R. Deroo and I. Mohamud

The purpose of this paper is to examine how a transnational immigrant youth’s engagement on social media supported her identity formation and allowed space to advance more…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how a transnational immigrant youth’s engagement on social media supported her identity formation and allowed space to advance more just framing of Islam across school and online communities.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative study draws on data collected across two years, including interviews, classroom observations and social media posts. Using digital religion and counterstorying as a constructive theoretical frame, the authors asked: What was the role of social media in supporting a transnational immigrant youth’s critical media literacy practices within and beyond school. How, if at all, did these practices shift over time?

Findings

Findings highlight how I. Mohamud used social media in support of her identity development as a female, Muslim youth in a political climate antithetical to such liberation and how through an online community she engaged in counter stories to negative framing of Islam.

Originality/value

Our collaborative writing answers Lam and Warriner’s (2012) call for research exploring how individuals from migrant backgrounds interact with “diverse media representations and mobilize different interpretive frames for understanding societal events and personal experiences” (p. 207). Moreover, this study further answers El-Haj and Bonet (2012) call for research investigating “ways that youth inhabit particular identities in specific contexts and interactions and across time” (p. 41).

Details

English Teaching: Practice & Critique, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1175-8708

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 9 July 2020

Alamira Samah Saleh

Like many social media trends, the romantic craze charms Egyptian youth. Romantic Facebook crush pages popped up locally in the past few years among university students…

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Abstract

Purpose

Like many social media trends, the romantic craze charms Egyptian youth. Romantic Facebook crush pages popped up locally in the past few years among university students particularly. They expressed a new aspect of online social interaction that has raised red flags with some adults, while thought to be a new healthy way to pour youth’s hearts out anonymously in a so-called a conservative society for others. Some crush pages, in particular, drew concerns of several parents for they are more vulgar and aggressive submissions. Laying between the two arguments, this study aims to examine the extent to which Facebook users make use of it to pursue romance, if Facebook’s characteristics and social context reflected in users’ perceptions of romantic relationships, the implications of being in a romantic relationship on Facebook and if such FB practices could pose a state of moral panic or a public concern.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of 200 Facebook users between 18 and 25 years was gathered. Furthermore, a content analysis of three Egyptian universities’ “crush pages” posts was applied.

Findings

The study highlighted the conflicting ideals of today’s Egyptian youth moral lives. Ultimately, there is an evidence that practices of using Facebook online crush pages have been creating new contested but delightful moral normative rules around love.

Originality/value

Crushes pages have been sweeping across Egyptian colleges and faculties; however, almost no Arabic study was done to figure out its impact. Furthermore, the study takes into account the socio-cultural background of the Egyptian society.

Details

Journal of Humanities and Applied Social Sciences, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2632-279X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Christopher Adam Bagley and Nader Al-Refai

The purpose of this paper is to review and synthesize published studies and practice in the “integration” of ethnic and religious minorities in Britain and The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review and synthesize published studies and practice in the “integration” of ethnic and religious minorities in Britain and The Netherlands, 1965-2015, drawing out implications for current policy and practice.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is an evaluative review and report of results of work on citizenship education for young Muslims and their peers in English schools.

Findings

Young Muslims have positive attitudes to “good citizenship”, as Islamic socialization makes them particularly responsive to citizenship messages. But there is hard-core racial prejudice and Islamophobia in about 25 per cent of adults. In The Netherlands, this xenophobia has supported far-right politicians who are strongly anti-Muslim. This paper cites evidence that continued prejudice may lead to alienation and radicalization of some minorities.

Research limitations/implications

Unchecked prejudice concerning minorities can have negative implications for both majority and minority groups this broad hypothesis deserves further research in both Dutch and British societies.

Practical implications

In Britain, success in Muslim schools in fostering positive citizenship implies that Muslim groups can maintain “quiet dignity” in following Islamic pathways to good citizenship.

Social implications

State support for religious-foundation schools should be offered to all religious groups and should not be withheld from Muslim minorities for “security” reasons.

Originality/value

This overview by two Muslim educators offers new insights and proposals in the acceptance of Muslim minorities in Europe.

Details

Journal for Multicultural Education, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-535X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2012

Fodil Fadli

Over more than thirty years of violent conflict, Northern Ireland had an intense sectarian violence due to the political-religious opposition between its Catholic and…

Abstract

Over more than thirty years of violent conflict, Northern Ireland had an intense sectarian violence due to the political-religious opposition between its Catholic and Protestant communities. The history of the Muslim community in Northern Ireland and the nature of the events in the region have had implications on the establishment of an Islamic environment. This paper aims to explore the problems encountered by the Muslim community in Northern Ireland in their attempt to build their first purpose built mosque. The paper is based on data collected during a study conducted between 2005 and 2007. However, a more recent literature review has been conducted. The study investigates the establishment of Islamic spaces, architecture and symbols. It explores the ways developed by the Muslim community in order to conceptualize and establish their first purpose-built mosque in Northern Ireland, but it also investigates how Muslim adapt and modify their domestic and communal spaces for their cultural, religious and identity needs and concerns. This paper offers an understanding of why the Muslim community needs to build its first formal-built-purpose mosque in Northern Ireland, and how the members of this community adapt to continuously changing liminal spaces.

Details

Open House International, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 April 2010

Paul R. Baines, Nicholas J. O'Shaughnessy, Kevin Moloney, Barry Richards, Sara Butler and Mark Gill

The purpose of this paper is to discuss exploratory research into the perceptions of British Muslims towards Islamist ideological messaging to contribute to the general…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss exploratory research into the perceptions of British Muslims towards Islamist ideological messaging to contribute to the general debate on “radicalisation”.

Design/methodology/approach

Four focus groups were undertaken with a mixture of Bangladeshi and Pakistani British Muslims who were shown a selection of Islamist propaganda media clips, garnered from the internet.

Findings

The paper proposess that Islamist communications focus on eliciting change in emotional states, specifically inducing the paratelic‐excitement mode, by focusing around a meta‐narrative of Muslims as a unitary grouping self‐defined as victim to Western aggression. It concludes that British Muslim respondents were unsympathetic to the Islamist ideological messaging contained in the sample of propaganda clips.

Originality/value

The paper provides an insight into how British Muslims might respond to Islamist communications, indicating that, while most are not susceptible to inducement of paratelic‐excitement, others are likely to be, dependent on which genre of clip is used, the messages contained therein, and who that clip is targeted at.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 44 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 September 2018

Mahfuzur Rahman, Mohamed Albaity, Che Ruhana Isa and Nurul Azma

This study aims to concern with Malaysian consumer involvement in fashion clothing. To achieve this, materialism, fashion clothing involvement and religiosity are examined…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to concern with Malaysian consumer involvement in fashion clothing. To achieve this, materialism, fashion clothing involvement and religiosity are examined as drivers of fashion clothing purchase involvement.

Design/methodology/approach

Gender, race and age are explored to have better understanding of fashion clothing purchase involvement in Malaysia. Data were gathered using a Malaysian university student sample, resulting in 281 completed questionnaires.

Findings

The results support the study’s model and its hypotheses and indicate that materialism, fashion clothing involvement and religiosity are significant drivers of fashion clothing purchase involvement. Also, materialism is a significant driver of fashion clothing involvement, and fashion clothing involvement mediates the relationship between materialism and fashion clothing purchase involvement. The results also show that Malaysian youth do not possess a high level of materialistic tendencies.

Originality/value

This study offers enormous opportunities for the international apparel marketers to formulate relevant business policies and strategies.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 March 2020

Tagreed Saleh Abalkhail

The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of religiosity on luxury brand consumption among Muslim women.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of religiosity on luxury brand consumption among Muslim women.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 322 women were surveyed. Data was collected in the capital city of Saudi Arabia and assessed using SEM.

Findings

The findings revealed that religion impacts consumers’ attitudes towards luxury brand consumption. A positive relationship was found between attitude towards luxury and luxury consumption. Also, attitude towards luxury mediated the relation between religiosity and luxury consumption.

Originality/value

The study’s findings serve to remind the retailers in Islamic countries to keep in mind the importance of religion in consumers’ preferences and selections.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Srinath Jagannathan, Patturaja Selvaraj and Jerome Joseph

This paper aims to show that the experience of workers on the margins of international business is akin to the funeralesque. The funeralesque is understood as the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to show that the experience of workers on the margins of international business is akin to the funeralesque. The funeralesque is understood as the appropriation of the value generated by workers across the production networks of international business.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing from the engagement with crematorium workers, the narratives of workers are articulated, describing the insecurities and injustices experienced by them. The authors draw from six-month-long qualitative engagement with seven workers in a crematorium in Ahmedabad, India.

Findings

The experience of marginal subjects provides important insights into how international business, in conjunction with states, structures inequality for marginal subjects. Precariousness, social exclusion, low wages and subjectivities of humiliation are the experiences of marginal subjects. The reproduction of marginality in globalising cities is an important element of the funeralesque through which extraction and re-distribution of value across international networks is legitimised.

Practical implications

In understanding international business as the funeralesque, the authors demystify the power relations constituted by it. The authors provide a metaphor for dethroning the legitimacy of international business and indicate that its modern practices are similar to the practices of value appropriation that occur in a funeral.

Originality/value

The authors develop the metaphor of the funeralesque to gain insights into the experiences of workers on the margins of international business. The authors are, thus, able to theorise the underbelly of globalising cities in a poetic, subversive way.

Details

critical perspectives on international business, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-2043

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 24 May 2022

Serah Shani

Purpose: This ethnography examines West African immigrant youth attending an Islamic madrassa in a New York City mosque and their future educational aspirations.Methods…

Abstract

Purpose: This ethnography examines West African immigrant youth attending an Islamic madrassa in a New York City mosque and their future educational aspirations.

Methods: This ethnographic research was conducted mainly through interviews of ten Muslim youth attending weekly madrasa at a West African mosque in the Bronx in New York City. I also did observations in the mosques, observing youth behavior, seating and listening in their classes, observing their interaction with one another and with their parents. While I had done this research within a month, I have been researching this community since 2006 at different times on the topic of parenting and schooling.

Findings: Muslim parents and teachers, concerned that children might fall into inner-city neighborhood life, engaged in teaching, guiding, and counseling the youth to keep them religiously and educationally engaged. As a result, the youth in this study demonstrated strong comittment to Islam and parental expectations but also expressed their own views of what their lives could become as transnational citizens.

Research implications: This research demonstrates that while schools, parents, and extracurricular programs are concerned with how youth will turn out, the youth are also making sense of their education experience in these spaces among others, and engage in carving a niche to inform their identity, education and career path. To this end, youth agency and voices should be acknowledged in educational research.

Value: The youth in this research demonstrate how contemporary young immigrants, living in a transnational world with diverse belief systems and ideals for success and socio-economic mobility, engage in imagination, resiliency and agency as they adapt to their new environment.

Details

Children and Youths' Migration in a Global Landscape
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-539-5

Keywords

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