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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2008

Hanada Taha‐Thomure

The purpose of this paper is to map out the status of Arabic language teaching as practiced in the Arab World today and to bring into focus the main issues that any…

1161

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to map out the status of Arabic language teaching as practiced in the Arab World today and to bring into focus the main issues that any improvement to that discipline would need to address.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of the current teaching practices and needs in the teaching of the Arabic language.

Findings

Arabic language teaching practices remain teacher centered and bound to teaching the textbook and overlooking the importance of aligning the curriculum to instruction and assessment.

Practical implications

The need is critical for writing national standards for the Arabic language in addition to establishing teacher colleges that offer quality pedagogical training all backed by sound research and generous funding.

Originality/value

The paper highlights the importance of teaching and seeing the Arabic language in a totally new light that preserves national identity yet embraces best teaching practices.

Details

Education, Business and Society: Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-7983

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Katia Medawar

Developing software for processing bibliographic materials in the Arabic language is a relatively recent development. When libraries in parts of the Middle East, where…

Abstract

Developing software for processing bibliographic materials in the Arabic language is a relatively recent development. When libraries in parts of the Middle East, where Arabic is the main language, started automating their collections, most library systems did not provide for the use of Arabic script and this capability had to be developed. Automated library systems started to emerge (like Minisis, ALEPH, Dobis/Libis, TinLib, OLIB) to fill the gap for non‐Roman scripts. This article describes the stages the American University of Beirut Libraries went through in converting their Arabic materials for use in the OLIB7 library management system. A description of the background of the library is given along with the details of the romanisation process, the conversion process, the software and hardware chosen, the testing of the database, problems encountered, output and the handling of authority records.

Details

Program, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 30 May 2022

Amani Mejri

This corpus-based study provides a descriptive account of the distribution of the polysemous noun nafs in two Arabic varieties, Modern Standard Arabic (MSA) and Classical…

Abstract

Purpose

This corpus-based study provides a descriptive account of the distribution of the polysemous noun nafs in two Arabic varieties, Modern Standard Arabic (MSA) and Classical Arabic (CA). The research objective is to survey the use of nafs as a reflexive marker in local binding domains and as a self-intensifier in NP-adjoined positions.

Design/methodology/approach

The consulted corpora are Timespamped JSI Web corpus for MSA and Quran corpus for CA. While attending to corpora size differences, MSA and CA exhibit a pattern of difference and similarity in nafs diffusion.

Findings

In the modern variety, nafs is pervasively used as reflexive marker in canonical binding domains, along with a less frequent, yet notable, intensifier user, and these uses are partially and cautiously attributed to the specific genre in which they occur. In CA, nafs is mainly recurrent as a polysemous noun, along with extensive use as a reflexive marker in local binding settings. As an intensifier, nafs is totally non-existent in the CA corpus, in the same way as it is in absentia in VP-constituent extraction in MSA.

Originality/value

Examining whether nafs, as a reflexive marker, deviates from canonical binding in Arabic the way English reflexive pronouns do. Building a general account of this distribution is relevant in understanding the explicit (syntactic) and implicit (discourse-based) dimensions of reflexive marker and self-intensifier processing and interpretation in Arabic as a first and second language.

Details

Saudi Journal of Language Studies, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2634-243X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2016

Ruth Barley

Drawing on research findings from an ethnography conducted with young children, exploring notions of difference, identity and peer interactions, this study uncovers how…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on research findings from an ethnography conducted with young children, exploring notions of difference, identity and peer interactions, this study uncovers how four- and five-year-olds initiated and maintained peer interactions within a linguistically diverse Early Years setting in the North of England.

Methodology/approach

This study adopted an applied ethnographic approach to gain the emic perspectives of children in the reception class at Sunnyside over a full academic year. Over the course of this school year I spent a day a week with the class undertaking non-participant and participant observations alongside unstructured informal conversations and focused on visual research activities.

Findings

Language and identity were closely intertwined in children’s patterns of interaction at Sunnyside. For some children language had a functional value while for others it was a symbolic marker of identity. Similarly, for some children their minority language held valuable linguistic capital while for others their first or home language was viewed as being something to shun. For all the children language was only one factor that played a role in initiating and maintaining their peer interactions at school. These implications will be discussed in this chapter.

Originality/value

Situated in a particular local context, this study provides an in-depth insight into the experiences of a linguistically diverse group of children from North and Sub-Saharan African countries who have come together in a single school setting where Somali and Arabic are the two key languages that are spoken by children in the class. This chapter discusses how these children viewed languages within the classroom context and how other identity markers associated with ethnicity, religion and nationality intersected with language within the context of ‘being friends’ at Sunnyside.

Details

Friendship and Peer Culture in Multilingual Settings
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-396-2

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 March 2022

Djamila Mohdeb, Meriem Laifa, Fayssal Zerargui and Omar Benzaoui

The present study was designed to investigate eight research questions that are related to the analysis and the detection of dialectal Arabic hate speech that targeted…

Abstract

Purpose

The present study was designed to investigate eight research questions that are related to the analysis and the detection of dialectal Arabic hate speech that targeted African refugees and illegal migrants on the YouTube Algerian space.

Design/methodology/approach

The transfer learning approach which recently presents the state-of-the-art approach in natural language processing tasks has been exploited to classify and detect hate speech in Algerian dialectal Arabic. Besides, a descriptive analysis has been conducted to answer the analytical research questions that aim at measuring and evaluating the presence of the anti-refugee/migrant discourse on the YouTube social platform.

Findings

Data analysis revealed that there has been a gradual modest increase in the number of anti-refugee/migrant hateful comments on YouTube since 2014, a sharp rise in 2017 and a sharp decline in later years until 2021. Furthermore, our findings stemming from classifying hate content using multilingual and monolingual pre-trained language transformers demonstrate a good performance of the AraBERT monolingual transformer in comparison with the monodialectal transformer DziriBERT and the cross-lingual transformers mBERT and XLM-R.

Originality/value

Automatic hate speech detection in languages other than English is quite a challenging task that the literature has tried to address by various approaches of machine learning. Although the recent approach of cross-lingual transfer learning offers a promising solution, tackling this problem in the context of the Arabic language, particularly dialectal Arabic makes it even more challenging. Our results cast a new light on the actual ability of the transfer learning approach to deal with low-resource languages that widely differ from high-resource languages as well as other Latin-based, low-resource languages.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 August 2021

Nael Alqtati, Jonathan A.J. Wilson and Varuna De Silva

This paper aims to equip professionals and researchers in the fields of advertising, branding, public relations, marketing communications, social media analytics and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to equip professionals and researchers in the fields of advertising, branding, public relations, marketing communications, social media analytics and marketing with a simple, effective and dynamic means of evaluating consumer behavioural sentiments and engagement through Arabic language and script, in vivo.

Design/methodology/approach

Using quantitative and qualitative situational linguistic analyses of Classical Arabic, found in Quranic and religious texts scripts; Modern Standard Arabic, which is commonly used in formal Arabic channels; and dialectical Arabic, which varies hugely from one Arabic country to another: this study analyses rich marketing and consumer messages (tweets) – as a basis for developing an Arabic language social media methodological tool.

Findings

Despite the popularity of Arabic language communication on social media platforms across geographies, currently, comprehensive language processing toolkits for analysing Arabic social media conversations have limitations and require further development. Furthermore, due to its unique morphology, developing text understanding capabilities specific to the Arabic language poses challenges.

Practical implications

This study demonstrates the application and effectiveness of the proposed methodology on a random sample of Twitter data from Arabic-speaking regions. Furthermore, as Arabic is the language of Islam, the study is of particular importance to Islamic and Muslim geographies, markets and marketing.

Social implications

The findings suggest that the proposed methodology has a wider potential beyond the data set and health-care sector analysed, and therefore, can be applied to further markets, social media platforms and consumer segments.

Originality/value

To remedy these gaps, this study presents a new methodology and analytical approach to investigating Arabic language social media conversations, which brings together a multidisciplinary knowledge of technology, data science and marketing communications.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 January 2020

Hany M. Alsalmi

Less attention has been paid to users’ interactions and behavior in studying multilingual search. Although digital library researchers have yet to assess user interaction…

Abstract

Purpose

Less attention has been paid to users’ interactions and behavior in studying multilingual search. Although digital library researchers have yet to assess user interaction and behavior in multilingual search, they have concurred that there is a need for user studies that document the extent to which information retrieval systems meet multilingual users’ needs and expectations. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is composed of five individual cases. The case study participants were Saudi students enrolled either at a large state university or Historically Black College and University located in the same community. Research questions are, what do Saudi Digital Library (SDL) users experience when searching within the SDL in Arabic and English? And what strategies do they use if they fail to find resources? Data collected for this study were via a qualitative method called video-stimulated recall.

Findings

In the Arabic search tasks, participants realized that finding resources is not easy. Participants expressed their concerns about the lack of relevance and accuracy of results returned by the search system, indicating weak trust and confidence in the search system. Whereas in the English search task, participants felt more satisfied and confident in their ability to trust the results returned from the search system. Participants expressed their satisfaction in the search experience as it provided them with accurate and varying resources. The participants faced difficulties finding Arabic resources than English resources in the SDL.

Originality/value

This study is considered one of the earliest works in studying the information-seeking behavior of multilingual digital libraries in the Arabic language. The value of this study arises as being the first study to investigate and report the information-seeking behavior of SDL users.

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2016

Jennifer Ball and Muna Kashoob

Most teachers in the Gulf would agree that Arab learners struggle more with reading and writing than listening and speaking. One little considered possible influence on…

Abstract

Most teachers in the Gulf would agree that Arab learners struggle more with reading and writing than listening and speaking. One little considered possible influence on this is the particular visual processing requirements of English. This article suggests why visual processing or visual cognition might be a particular difficulty for Arab students reading English. It offers a simple classroom checklist that may assist teachers to notice if visual processing strain could be effecting their student’s attention, motivation and performance.

Details

Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: Gulf Perspectives, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2077-5504

Article
Publication date: 4 August 2020

Imane Guellil, Ahsan Adeel, Faical Azouaou, Sara Chennoufi, Hanene Maafi and Thinhinane Hamitouche

This paper aims to propose an approach for hate speech detection against politicians in Arabic community on social media (e.g. Youtube). In the literature, similar works…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to propose an approach for hate speech detection against politicians in Arabic community on social media (e.g. Youtube). In the literature, similar works have been presented for other languages such as English. However, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, not much work has been conducted in the Arabic language.

Design/methodology/approach

This approach uses both classical algorithms of classification and deep learning algorithms. For the classical algorithms, the authors use Gaussian NB (GNB), Logistic Regression (LR), Random Forest (RF), SGD Classifier (SGD) and Linear SVC (LSVC). For the deep learning classification, four different algorithms (convolutional neural network (CNN), multilayer perceptron (MLP), long- or short-term memory (LSTM) and bi-directional long- or short-term memory (Bi-LSTM) are applied. For extracting features, the authors use both Word2vec and FastText with their two implementations, namely, Skip Gram (SG) and Continuous Bag of Word (CBOW).

Findings

Simulation results demonstrate the best performance of LSVC, BiLSTM and MLP achieving an accuracy up to 91%, when it is associated to SG model. The results are also shown that the classification that has been done on balanced corpus are more accurate than those done on unbalanced corpus.

Originality/value

The principal originality of this paper is to construct a new hate speech corpus (Arabic_fr_en) which was annotated by three different annotators. This corpus contains the three languages used by Arabic people being Arabic, French and English. For Arabic, the corpus contains both script Arabic and Arabizi (i.e. Arabic words written with Latin letters). Another originality is to rely on both shallow and deep leaning classification by using different model for extraction features such as Word2vec and FastText with their two implementation SG and CBOW.

Details

International Journal of Web Information Systems, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-0084

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1994

Khalid Al‐Anzi and Mel Collier

This paper analyses the current state of Arabisation of automated library systems. Problems of Arabic language handling and limitations of Romanisation are described. The…

Abstract

This paper analyses the current state of Arabisation of automated library systems. Problems of Arabic language handling and limitations of Romanisation are described. The areas of character encoding, standards for coding and bibliographic records, character recognition and lexical analysis are synthesised. The current state of Arabisation in commercial library systems is reviewed and areas for further research identified.

Details

Program, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

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