Search results

1 – 10 of 10
Article
Publication date: 15 July 2020

Amy M. Morrissette and Jennifer L. Kisamore

The purpose of this study is two-fold. First, the nature of the relationship between team trust and team performance in the business context is determined. Second, both team…

3145

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is two-fold. First, the nature of the relationship between team trust and team performance in the business context is determined. Second, both team design (team size and team type) and methodological moderators (source of criterion measure and study date) of the relationship are assessed.

Design/methodology/approach

A random-effects meta-analysis was performed on published and unpublished empirical studies. Subgroup moderator analyses were conducted using Cochran’s Q. Continuous moderator analyses were conducted using meta-regression.

Findings

Data from 55 independent studies (3,671 teams) were pooled. Results indicated a large, positive relationship between team trust and team performance in real business teams. Further analyses indicated that the relationship was significantly moderated by business team type, team size and source of criterion measure.

Research limitations/implications

Results indicate that different team types, sizes and performance criteria should not be treated as equivalent. Results are based on cross-sectional research and can only be generalized to business teams.

Practical implications

Managers should be attentive to trust issues in work teams, as they may portend future performance problems or mirror other organizational issues that affect team performance. Team function and size predict how team trust is related to team performance.

Originality/value

The present study answers a call by Costa et al. (2018) for additional investigation of moderators of the trust-performance relationship in teams using a quantitative review of studies.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Victoria L. Pace and Jennifer L. Kisamore

To maximize their effectiveness, exit interviews should incorporate employee voice and be aligned with other HR processes. The purpose of this paper is to describe a three-step…

1618

Abstract

Purpose

To maximize their effectiveness, exit interviews should incorporate employee voice and be aligned with other HR processes. The purpose of this paper is to describe a three-step approach to the strategic use of exit interviews.

Design/methodology/approach

The current study synthesizes extant theory including that of employee voice to enhance the exit interview process. A qualitative study conducted within a large marketing research organization demonstrates how exit interviews that utilize employee voice can inform HR and organizational strategy.

Findings

Application of the proposed process to the case study revealed conditions, critical incidents, and cognitive processes underlying exit decisions for employees in several job categories. Qualitative exit information is used to describe corresponding employee withdrawal paths.

Practical implications

Use of the three-step exit interview process is expected to enhance HR decisions. Data gathered from the three-step process can be used by HR and organizational leaders to develop action plans as well as inform an organization’s strategic decisions.

Originality/value

An organizational example is presented in which insight into underlying causes of voluntary turnover are discovered through exit interviews. Exit interview information suggested interventions related to HR processes. Such targeted insights from exit interviews can greatly improve retention and enhance organizational effectiveness.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 March 2023

I. M. Jawahar, Jennifer L. Kisamore and Thomas H. Stone

Drawing on the conservation of resources theory, the purpose of this paper is to examine whether role conflict is associated with frustration of employees’ basic needs and whether…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on the conservation of resources theory, the purpose of this paper is to examine whether role conflict is associated with frustration of employees’ basic needs and whether need frustration is associated with withdrawal in the form of reduced voice and increased silence. This paper also investigates if supervisor support mitigates potential detrimental outcomes of need frustration.

Design/methodology/approach

In this survey-based study, 201 full-time employees participated. Self-reports regarding voice and silence behaviors at work were collected as were perceptions of role conflict, need frustration and supervisor support.

Findings

The results of this study support the proposed moderated mediation relationships for both employee voice and silence behaviors. Specifically, need frustration mediates the relationship between role conflict and the two outcome variables. Perceived supervisor support moderates the path between need frustration and both voice and silence behaviors.

Practical implications

Employees are an organization’s first line of defense against potential accidents, inefficiencies and other organizational crises. When they perceive their needs are not met and they are not supported by their supervisors, employees are likely to seek to protect themselves from further resource loss by withholding feedback even if such feedback may enhance organizational effectiveness and prevent organizational crises.

Originality/value

Given that voice and silence are not opposites of each other, it is important to study both in a single study, as this study does. This study proposes and tests a heretofore untested explanation for the relationship between role conflict and voice and silence. The authors identify a buffer with potential to mitigate the negative effects of need frustration.

Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Jeffrey Muldoon, Jennifer L. Kisamore, Eric W. Liguori, I.M. Jawahar and Joshua Bendickson

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether job meaning and job autonomy moderate the relationship between emotional stability and organizational citizenship behavior.

1674

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether job meaning and job autonomy moderate the relationship between emotional stability and organizational citizenship behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 190 supervisor-subordinate dyads completed three surveys. Linear and curvilinear analyses were used to assess the data.

Findings

Results indicate emotionally stable individuals are more likely to perform OCBOs in low autonomy and/or low job meaning situations than are employees low in emotional stability. Conversely, individuals who have high autonomy and/or high meaning jobs are likely to engage in OCBOs regardless of personality.

Research limitations/implications

As a survey-based research study, causal conclusions cannot be drawn from this study. Results suggest future research on the personality-performance relationship needs to more closely consider context and the potential for curvilinear relationships.

Practical implications

Managers should note that personality may significantly affect job performance and consider placing individuals in jobs that best align with their personality strengths.

Originality/value

This study sheds light on factors which may have led to erroneous conclusions in the extant literature that the relationship between personality and performance is weak.

Article
Publication date: 19 June 2009

Thomas H. Stone, I.M. Jawahar and Jennifer L. Kisamore

The purpose of this paper is to show that academic misconduct appears to be on the rise; some research has linked academic misconduct to unethical workplace behaviors. Unlike…

5718

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show that academic misconduct appears to be on the rise; some research has linked academic misconduct to unethical workplace behaviors. Unlike previous empirically‐driven research, this theory‐based study seeks to examine the usefulness of a modification of Ajzen's theory of planned behavior to predict academic misconduct.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 271 students enrolled at a US university were surveyed. Structural equation modeling was used to test the model.

Findings

The modified theory of a planned behavior model in which intentions and justifications both serve as antecedents to behavior fits the data well. The model accounted for 22 per cent of the variance in intentions to cheat and 47 per cent of the variance in self‐reported cheating.

Research limitations/implications

The primary limitations of this research are the cross‐sectional research design, the self‐selected sample, and the single source of survey data.

Practical implications

The study extends the TPB model in the prediction of misconduct behavior. Attitudes, subjective norms, behavioral control, intentions and justifications were related to cheating behaviors. Academic misconduct may be reduced by shaping attitudes toward cheating, changing perceptions of subjective norms regarding the prevalence of cheating, and lowering students' perceptions of their control of cheating by, for example, emphasis on the consequences of getting caught. Understanding and reducing academic misconduct are important for promoting ethical behavior and values in future worker and organization leaders.

Originality/value

Identification of factors that influence academic misconduct is an important aspect of professional development research, given its link to workplace misconduct. To date, academic misconduct research has been primarily empirically‐ rather than theory‐driven. The current study identifies factors that contribute to academic misconduct by extending an established theoretical model of behavior.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Jennifer L. Kisamore, Eric W. Liguori, Jeffrey Muldoon and I.M. Jawahar

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the interaction between self-reported proactive personality, competence, and interpersonal conflict in the prediction of supervisor…

1808

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the interaction between self-reported proactive personality, competence, and interpersonal conflict in the prediction of supervisor ratings of organizational citizenship behaviors directed at individuals (OCBI) and organizations (OCBO).

Design/methodology/approach

Data were obtained from 165 full-time subordinate-supervisor dyads. Employees self-reported personality and control variable information in wave 1 and competence and interpersonal conflict information in wave 2. Data regarding employee OCB performance were collected from supervisors in wave 3.

Findings

Results suggest that OCBs are performed less frequently in stressful circumstances but that proactive personality appears to assuage the effects of stress. Significant two- and three-way interactions suggest the interplay of personal and situational characteristics are more complex in predicting OCBO than OCBI, likely due to its more distal nature.

Practical implications

Results of the current study suggest steps managers may want to take to increase employee performance of OCBs, specifically, selecting proactive individuals, creating training programs to bolster employees’ competence, and minimizing interpersonal conflict at work.

Originality/value

The current study confirms and extends extant research. The current study goes beyond previous work to consider a more complex interaction of factors that are related to employee engagement in OCBs.

Article
Publication date: 26 October 2010

Jennifer L. Kisamore, I.M. Jawahar, Eric W. Liguori, Tagonei L. Mharapara and Thomas H. Stone

The purpose of this study is to investigate the moderating effects of social competencies, specifically, political skill, self‐monitoring and emotional intelligence, on the…

9136

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the moderating effects of social competencies, specifically, political skill, self‐monitoring and emotional intelligence, on the workplace conflict‐abusive behavior relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The study utilized data collected from graduate and undergraduate students majoring in psychology, management, human relations and social work who were recruited from two mid‐sized mid‐western universities. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis was used to test the study hypotheses.

Findings

Results indicated that interpersonal conflict in the workplace is associated with employee engagement in counterproductive work behaviors. Results also suggested that social competencies interacted with interpersonal conflict to predict the likelihood of abusing others at work. Politically skilled workers and high self‐monitors were more likely to engage in abusive behaviors when experiencing high levels of interpersonal workplace conflict.

Originality/value

The study is the first to show that certain social competencies may actually have negative ramifications in the workplace. Specifically, individuals who are politically skilled and/or high self‐monitors are more likely to abuse others when they themselves experience interpersonal conflict.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 15 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 August 2022

Andrea Pemberton and Jennifer Kisamore

Burnout has been linked to a myriad of negative organizational and individual health outcomes which threaten employee and organizational well-being. This study examines how unique…

Abstract

Purpose

Burnout has been linked to a myriad of negative organizational and individual health outcomes which threaten employee and organizational well-being. This study examines how unique features of diversity and inclusion (D&I) work are related to burnout.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants were recruited using network and convenience sampling strategies. A total of 64 full-time employees whose primary responsibility is to implement the D&I strategy for their organization provided useable data for analysis. Participants completed measures of burnout, role ambiguity, role conflict, subjective experiences of tokenism, and top management support. Measures were administered online via Qualtrics.

Findings

Results suggest lack of clear job duties, conflicting job demands, lack of top management support, and experiences of tokenism are associated with D&I professionals' experiences of burnout. The current study, however, indicates that while D&I professional experience higher levels of exhaustion than other professionals, they also experience greater professional efficacy, which suggests D&I roles are both challenging and rewarding.

Practical implications

Results suggest organizational leaders may mitigate employee burnout by providing clear support to and role definitions for D&I professionals.

Originality/value

This study is the first to explore burnout experiences among D&I professionals. Additionally, this study examines how burnout experiences are associated with role dysfunctions, top management support, and subjective experiences of tokenism.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 42 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 September 2022

Ramy Hindiyeh and Jennifer Cross

The purpose of this paper is to identify, through an exploratory meta-analysis, which process- and outcome-related antecedents have the strongest relationship to overall team…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify, through an exploratory meta-analysis, which process- and outcome-related antecedents have the strongest relationship to overall team performance. The secondary objective is to create an understanding of the extent to which relative research interest in each construct to date has aligned with its reported effects.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a random-effects meta-analysis on studies that have measured the relationship between at least one process or outcome factor and overall team performance. The number of studies, effect size and between-study variances are captured and analyzed for each process/outcome factor. Prior literature has explored relationships between various process/outcome factors and overall team performance. This study expands on previous literature by examining a comprehensive set of process/outcome factors and their relative impact on overall team performance.

Findings

A meta-analysis of 190 effect sizes extracted from 52 empirical studies over the past two decades (1999–2020) showed the specific process and outcome factors that most strongly contributed to overall team performance were efficiency, schedule and innovation. In addition, only a weak correlation was found between process and outcome factors’ relationships with overall team performance and how often they are studied in the research community.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the body of knowledge on team performance by examining prior research to identify the relevant impact of various process and outcome factors on overall team performance. In addition, this study also assesses the extent to which research interest in these factors has appeared to match their relative impact. Analyzing the relative impact of various process and outcome factors allows researchers and practitioners to better identify methods to create improvement in overall team performance. Based on the findings, prioritizing efficiency, schedule and innovation may promote overall team performance.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 19 September 2023

S.E. Galaitsi, Krista Rand, Elissa Yeates, Cary Talbot, Arleen O'Donnell, Elizaveta Pinigina and Igor Linkov

Water is a critical and contentious resource in California, hence any changes in reservoir management requires coordination among many basin stakeholders. The Forecast-Informed…

Abstract

Purpose

Water is a critical and contentious resource in California, hence any changes in reservoir management requires coordination among many basin stakeholders. The Forecast-Informed Reservoir Operations (FIRO) pilot project at Lake Mendocino, California explored the viability of using weather forecasts to alter the operations of a United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) reservoir. The pilot project demonstrated FIRO's ability to improve water supply reliability, but also revealed the key role of a collaborative Steering Committee. Because Lake Mendocino's Viability Assessment did not explore the features of the Steering Committee, this study aims to examine the relationships and interactions between Steering Committee members that supported FIRO's implementation at Lake Mendocino.

Design/methodology/approach

The project identified 17 key project participants who spoke at a FIRO workshop or emerged through chain-referrals. Using semi-structured interviews with these participants, the project examined the dynamics of human interactions that enabled the successful multi-institutional and multi-criteria innovation as analyzed through text-coding.

Findings

The results reveal the importance for FIRO Steering Committee members to understand the limitations and constraints of stakeholder counterparts at other organizations, the importance of building and safeguarding relationships, and the role of trust and belonging between members. The lessons learned suggest several interventions to support successful group collaboration dynamics for future FIRO projects.

Originality/value

This study identifies features of the Steering Committee that contributed to FIRO's success by supporting collaborative negotiations of infrastructure operations within a multi-institutional and multi-criteria context.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

Keywords

1 – 10 of 10