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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2019

Swati Singh and Sita Vanka

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the importance of the employee voice in the present era. This paper discusses the drawbacks of not attending to employee voice

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the importance of the employee voice in the present era. This paper discusses the drawbacks of not attending to employee voice, benefits of listening to it and strategies, as well as the methods of capturing the voice of employees.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses illustration to explain how Cisco used employee voice to revamp its HR.

Findings

The research on this area indicates that although listening to employee voice is beneficial, most organizations ignore it. The findings suggest that the voice of employee cannot be ignored in the technology-led era, as employees have many platforms to raise their concerns. Additionally, ignoring their voice can be perilous. Attending to employee voice brings many advantages, and thus it should be prioritized, promoted and practiced. The paper carries implications for HR managers, business leaders and researchers in this field.

Originality/value

This paper uniquely discusses the significance of employee voice in the present era. It also presents the strategies and methods to capture employee voice. Furthermore, it demonstrates the benefits of attending to employee voice with the help of an illustration.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

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Article
Publication date: 6 October 2021

Shuwen Li, Ruiqian Jia and Rui Sun

The purpose of this study is to examine the differential association of family supportive supervisor behavior on promotive voice under different gender. Further, while…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the differential association of family supportive supervisor behavior on promotive voice under different gender. Further, while employees’ self-concept factors have received considerable attention in the research on the triggering mechanism of employee voice, the authors’ knowledge about how and when family factors affect employee voice remains underdeveloped.

Design/methodology/approach

According to the resource conservation theory and gender role theory, the authors constructed a research model to investigate the influence and boundary of family supportive supervisor behavior on employee promotive voice and tested their research model using a paired data of 332 married employees and their direct supervisors of enterprises in China.

Findings

The findings suggest that family supportive supervisor behavior has a positive effect on employee promotive voice. Family supportive supervisor behavior can strengthen employee promotive voice by improving work-to-family enrichment and reducing work–family conflict, yet no significant mediation effect was found regarding family-to-work enrichment and conflict. Furthermore, family supportive supervisor behavior is more likely to improve female employee work–family enrichment and assuage male employee work–family conflict and thus enhance employee promotive voice.

Originality/value

This study sheds light on the different influential paths of family supportive supervisor behavior on promotive voice of employees of different genders and provides references for enterprises to motivate employees’ promotive voice.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article
Publication date: 9 September 2021

Jola-Ade Ashiru, Galip Erzat Erdil and Dokun Oluwajana

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of high performance work systems (HPWSs) on employee voice, employee innovation and organization performance in a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of high performance work systems (HPWSs) on employee voice, employee innovation and organization performance in a service organization. The study examines the mediating roles of employee voice on HPWSs and organizational performance.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was distributed to 600 professional staff and a total number of 360 respondents returned the survey. The hypotheses are tested through the use of the variance-based structural equation modeling (SEM) technique.

Findings

These findings indicate that the HPWS has a significant impact on employee innovation and organization performance. The empirical evidence does not support the relationship between HPWS and employee voice and also employee voice does not mediate the relationship between HPWS and organization performance in a human resource (HR) service organization.

Research limitations/implications

Employee voice does not empirically mediate the relationship between HPWS and organization performance; other factors can be further explored. Future research should employ other theories of strategic human resource management (SHRM) to further explore more factors that influence the HPWS on employee innovation, employee voice and organization performance.

Practical implications

The organization should respond to employee voice through aforementioned rather than the use of traditional, strategic and operational methods or tools believed to be the best approach to employee issues.

Originality/value

This study builds a solid empirical investigation that contributes to the HPWS existing body of knowledge. It is also significant as it is one of the few studies that examine the link between HPWS and job outcomes, like employee voice, employee innovation and organizational performance, in an HR service organization and also employee voice as a mediator on HPWS and organizational performance.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2021

Naseer Abbas Khan and Ali Nawaz Khan

The purpose of this study is to explore the impact of abusive supervision on employees' voice in China's construction industry. Moreover, the authors explore the mediating…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the impact of abusive supervision on employees' voice in China's construction industry. Moreover, the authors explore the mediating role of ethics-related self-efficacy and work engagement and the moderating influence of psychological climate in explaining the association between abusive supervision and employee voice behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used data in pairs collected from 402 supervisors and employees of construction companies in Anhui, China. In this study, the authors used the time-lag approach to collect data in three-time waves from different respondents. A structural equation modeling (SEM) approach was applied to test the hypothesized model.

Findings

The results of this study indicate that there is a significant association between abusive supervision and employee voice. Moreover, the results indicated that work engagement mediated the association between abusive supervision and employees' voice. In contrast, self-efficacy did not mediate the link between abusive supervision and employee voice. Furthermore, results also show that the contingent effect of psychological climate significantly influences the mediating effect of work engagement.

Originality/value

This study also has implications for the construction industry, allowing managers to create a favorable working atmosphere in which employees can reinforce their voices at work.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 5 August 2021

Yung-Kuei Huang and Linchi Kwok

This study aims to assess a moderated-mediation model to account for the relationship between customer mistreatment and frontline hotel employees’ customer-focused voice

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to assess a moderated-mediation model to account for the relationship between customer mistreatment and frontline hotel employees’ customer-focused voice, where their organization-based self-esteem (OBSE) served as a mediator and their felt trust (reliance and disclosure) by supervisors served as a moderator.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected through paper-based questionnaires in a cross-sectional survey, consisting of 319 valid supervisor-employee-paired responses from 33 international tourist hotels in Taiwan. Regression analyses were used for hypothesis testing.

Findings

OBSE mediates the negative effect of customer mistreatment on customer-focused voice. Employee felt reliance intensifies the negative impact of customer mistreatment on OBSE, and this interaction effect, in turn, reduces customer-focused voice through OBSE. The employee felt disclosure marginally significantly buffers the effect of customer mistreatment on OBSE.

Practical implications

Given the adverse effect of customer mistreatment on customer-focused voice through OBSE, hotels should strengthen employees’ service mindset and value their suggestions. The double-edged effects of felt trust suggest that managers should form a trusting relationship with their subordinates and reassure them that isolated incidents of customer mistreatment will not jeopardize their reputation.

Originality/value

This study integrated sociometer and self-consistency theories to examine OBSE as a psychological mechanism to explain the mistreatment-voice process. Besides assessing felt trust’s two-dimensional effects, this research is possibly the first attempt to examine felt trust as an enabling force or a threat to OBSE in the context of customer mistreatment.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 33 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2021

Yishuai Yin, Jinyun Duan, Tingxi Wang and Xuhui Jiao

Drawing on a costs-benefit analysis perspective, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between managerial openness and employee voice and its…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on a costs-benefit analysis perspective, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between managerial openness and employee voice and its boundary conditions.

Design/methodology/approach

This study collected three waves of data by surveying 326 pairs of employees and their supervisors. The hypotheses were tested by using Hayes’s (2018) SPSS macro application with a bootstrap approach to obtain confidence intervals.

Findings

Managerial openness facilitates employee voice by decreasing perceived voice costs. Felt obligation positively moderates the direct as well as the indirect relationship between perceived voice costs and employee voice.

Originality/value

This study uncovers the alternative mechanism underlying the relationship between managerial openness and employee voice as well as the boundary condition of this relationship.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

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Book part
Publication date: 16 July 2018

Shane Connelly and Brett S. Torrence

Organizational behavior scholars have long recognized the importance of a variety of emotion-related phenomena in everyday work life. Indeed, after three decades, the span…

Abstract

Organizational behavior scholars have long recognized the importance of a variety of emotion-related phenomena in everyday work life. Indeed, after three decades, the span of research on emotions in the workplace encompasses a wide variety of affective variables such as emotional climate, emotional labor, emotion regulation, positive and negative affect, empathy, and more recently, specific emotions. Emotions operate in complex ways across multiple levels of analysis (i.e., within-person, between-person, interpersonal, group, and organizational) to exert influence on work behavior and outcomes, but their linkages to human resource management (HRM) policies and practices have not always been explicit or well understood. This chapter offers a review and integration of the bourgeoning research on discrete positive and negative emotions, offering insights about why these emotions are relevant to HRM policies and practices. We review some of the dominant theories that have emerged out of functionalist perspectives on emotions, connecting these to a strategic HRM framework. We then define and describe four discrete positive and negative emotions (fear, pride, guilt, and interest) highlighting how they relate to five HRM practices: (1) selection, (2) training/learning, (3) performance management, (4) incentives/rewards, and (5) employee voice. Following this, we discuss the emotion perception and regulation implications of these and other discrete emotions for leaders and HRM managers. We conclude with some challenges associated with understanding discrete emotions in organizations as well as some opportunities and future directions for improving our appreciation and understanding of the role of discrete emotional experiences in HRM.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-322-3

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Book part
Publication date: 2 December 2016

Gilton Klerck

The paper explores the historical evolution of employee voice in Namibia from an employment relations (ER) perspective and in the context of institutional factors such as…

Abstract

The paper explores the historical evolution of employee voice in Namibia from an employment relations (ER) perspective and in the context of institutional factors such as labour legislation, trade union strategies, company policies and governmental regulations. The first part of the paper provides a brief outline of ER conceptions of voice that are manifest in the recent resurgence of interest in the topic. The next part traces the historical evolution of labour regulation and employee voice in Namibia. It is shown that, in the absence of collective voice and statutory protections, informal voice and occupational solidarity were the primary means of defence available to black workers against oppressive conditions. In the final part, an outline of some key features of employee voice in contemporary Namibia is provided. The analysis shows that systems of employee voice are fundamentally a manifestation of the balance of powers at a particular time and place. It is therefore crucial to link voice preferences and behaviours in the workplace to specific preconditions and to highlight the limiting factors that serve to constrain choice.

Details

Employee Voice in Emerging Economies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-240-8

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Article
Publication date: 30 April 2021

R. Prince and M.K. Rao

The purpose of this study is to explore how and when an employee's belief in their voice self-efficacy leads to promotive and prohibitive voice behavior. By banking on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore how and when an employee's belief in their voice self-efficacy leads to promotive and prohibitive voice behavior. By banking on social cognitive theory, this study examines perceived influence at work as a mediator and managerial openness as a moderator in the link between voice self-efficacy and the two forms of voice.

Design/methodology/approach

This study's data come from 285 Indian information technology (IT) employees by adopting a cross-sectional survey design. The effect of moderator and mediator is examined by employing structural equation modeling in AMOS 22.

Findings

The results reveal that perceived influence at work partially mediates the positive link between voice self-efficacy and the two forms of voice behaviors. The test of moderation also exposes that prohibitive voice is more contingent on managerial openness as compared to promotive voice.

Originality/value

This is one of the initial studies to explore perceived influence at work as a mediator in the association between voice self-efficacy and employee voice behavior. The treatment of voice as a bidimensional construct in this study discloses the difference between the two forms, contributing to the voice literature and inviting further research.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Book part
Publication date: 2 December 2016

Johann Maree

This paper examines the exercise of Black employee voice in South Africa over the past 53 years. Black workers constitute almost 4 out of every 5 workers in the country…

Abstract

This paper examines the exercise of Black employee voice in South Africa over the past 53 years. Black workers constitute almost 4 out of every 5 workers in the country and experienced racial oppression from the time of colonisation up to the end of apartheid in 1994. They are still congregated around the lower skilled occupations with low incomes and high unemployment levels.

The paper draws on the theory of voice, exit and loyalty of Albert Hirschman, but extends voice to include sabotage as this encapsulates the nature of employee voice from about 2007 onwards. It reflects a culture of insurgence that entered employment relations from about that time onwards, but was lurking below the surface well before then.

The exercise of employee voice has gone through five phases from 1963 to mid-2016 starting with a silent phase for the first ten years when it was hardly heard at all. However, as a Black trade union movement emerged after extensive strikes in Durban in 1973, employee voice grew stronger and stronger until it reached an insurgent phase.

The phases employee voice went through were heavily influenced by the socio-political situation in the country. The reason for the emergence of an insurgent phase was due to the failure of the ruling African National Congress government to deliver services and to alleviate the plight of the poor in South Africa, most of whom are Black. The failure was due to neo-patrimonialism and corruption practised by the ruling elite and politically connected. Protests by local communities escalated and became increasingly violent. This spilled over into the workplace. As a result many strikes turned violent and destructive, demonstrating voice exercised as sabotage and reflecting a culture of insurgence.

Details

Employee Voice in Emerging Economies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-240-8

Keywords

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