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Article

Ferda Erdem and Janset Ozen

In this study, the importance of a climate of trust in promoting teamwork is presented, and the findings of an empirical study of 50 work‐based teams are discussed…

Abstract

In this study, the importance of a climate of trust in promoting teamwork is presented, and the findings of an empirical study of 50 work‐based teams are discussed. According to these findings, teams which show high levels of trust (both cognitive and affective dimensions of trust) perform better. As a result of these findings, it is strongly recommended that trust should be a primary value of the organisational culture, that behaviour which promotes trust and protection should be encouraged in teamwork, and that trustworthy behaviour should be treated as a measurement of performance for the purposes of employee appraisal.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article

Ferda Erdem

Suggests that there is an optimal level of trust in many team situations. Too much trust can impact negatively on performance. Uses empirical research involving 142…

Abstract

Suggests that there is an optimal level of trust in many team situations. Too much trust can impact negatively on performance. Uses empirical research involving 142 members of 28 teams to identify factors that relate to this optimal level of trust, and those factors that demonstrate undesirable behaviors. In order to maximize team performance, teams must exhibit critical enquiry and constructive criticism in addition to a supportive understanding.

Details

Work Study, vol. 52 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

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Book part

Trevor N. Fry, Kyi Phyu Nyein and Jessica L. Wildman

Theories of trust imply that team trust develops and grows over time, yet relatively few researchers have taken on the challenge of studying team trust in longitudinal…

Abstract

Purpose

Theories of trust imply that team trust develops and grows over time, yet relatively few researchers have taken on the challenge of studying team trust in longitudinal research designs. The purpose of this chapter is to provide a concise summary of the existing literature on team trust over time, and to offer a conceptual model of team-level trust development over time to aid future research on this topic.

Methodology/approach

We draw from the Input–Mediator–Output–Input (IMOI) framework, as well as previous multilevel models of organizational trust development, and published findings from longitudinal team trust studies.

Findings

Taking a temporal perspective, we consider how team-level mediators and outcomes can both predict and be predicted by team trust trajectories and feedback loops over time, as well as how those relationships with team trust might change based on the existence of other moderating variables including trust violation and repair.

Research implications

Future longitudinal team research may use the model as a starting point for investigating the antecedents, as well as the team processes and dynamic emergent states, that can effectively predict trajectories of team trust across various stages of teamwork.

Practical implications

Based on our review of extant literature, we provide several recommendations for training and organizational intervention including the importance of management’s consideration of team-level trust in providing feedback, enhancing cohesion, and mitigating conflict.

Originality/value

We provide insight into the development of team trust trajectories and offer a framework to help guide future longitudinal team trust research.

Details

Team Dynamics Over Time
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-403-7

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Article

Elizabeth Fisher Turesky, Coby D. Smith and Ted K. Turesky

The purpose of this study is to investigate the leadership behaviors of managers of virtual teams (VTs), particularly in the areas of trust building and conflict…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the leadership behaviors of managers of virtual teams (VTs), particularly in the areas of trust building and conflict management. This study aims to expand the research of VT performance by offering first-person accounts from VT leaders on the strategies implemented to drive VT performance.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a grounded theory approach to examine the leadership behaviors through in-depth interviews with eight field managers of VTs employed by different technology companies. Interview questions focused on trust-building and conflict management techniques. This structured qualitative study incorporates elements of narrative inquiry interwoven in the findings.

Findings

Building a high-trust environment was found to be critical to VT performance. VT managers indicated that effective conflict resolution skills were also important.

Research limitations/implications

Although the sample size is within the suggested range for a valid phenomenological study, the results may lack generalizability. Participants were limited to the technology industry; leaders of high-performing VTs in other industries could offer differing results.

Practical implications

This study’s contribution is the exploration and identification of innovative techniques that VT managers implemented to build trust and resolve conflict. A lack of holistic training programs for the VT leader is also considered along with suggestions for future research and implications for the VT managers.

Originality/value

This study’s contribution is the exploration and identification of innovative techniques that VT managers implemented that drive VT performance, particularly related to building high levels of trust and managing conflict effectively. Practices are suggested whereby both the VT leader and the organization take an active role in ensuring that the VT has the opportunity to perform optimally.

Details

Organization Management Journal, vol. 17 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN:

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Book part

Luis L. Martins and Marieke C. Schilpzand

Global virtual teams (GVTs) – composed of members in two or more countries who work together primarily using information and communication technologies – are increasingly…

Abstract

Global virtual teams (GVTs) – composed of members in two or more countries who work together primarily using information and communication technologies – are increasingly prevalent in organizations today. There has been a burgeoning of research on this relatively new organizational unit, spanning various academic disciplines. In this chapter, we review and discuss the major developments in this area of research. Based on our review, we identify areas in need of future research, suggest research directions that have the potential to enhance theory development, and provide practical guidelines on managing and working in GVTs.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-554-0

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Article

Amy M. Morrissette and Jennifer L. Kisamore

The purpose of this study is two-fold. First, the nature of the relationship between team trust and team performance in the business context is determined. Second, both…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is two-fold. First, the nature of the relationship between team trust and team performance in the business context is determined. Second, both team design (team size and team type) and methodological moderators (source of criterion measure and study date) of the relationship are assessed.

Design/methodology/approach

A random-effects meta-analysis was performed on published and unpublished empirical studies. Subgroup moderator analyses were conducted using Cochran’s Q. Continuous moderator analyses were conducted using meta-regression.

Findings

Data from 55 independent studies (3,671 teams) were pooled. Results indicated a large, positive relationship between team trust and team performance in real business teams. Further analyses indicated that the relationship was significantly moderated by business team type, team size and source of criterion measure.

Research limitations/implications

Results indicate that different team types, sizes and performance criteria should not be treated as equivalent. Results are based on cross-sectional research and can only be generalized to business teams.

Practical implications

Managers should be attentive to trust issues in work teams, as they may portend future performance problems or mirror other organizational issues that affect team performance. Team function and size predict how team trust is related to team performance.

Originality/value

The present study answers a call by Costa et al. (2018) for additional investigation of moderators of the trust-performance relationship in teams using a quantitative review of studies.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article

Meng Chenli, Ge Yuhui, Liu Xihuai and Eugene Abrokwah

The purpose of this paper is to test the mediating role of top management team (TMT) team trust in examining the relationship between team processes (internal and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test the mediating role of top management team (TMT) team trust in examining the relationship between team processes (internal and external) and human resource management (HRM) decision performance (quality and satisfaction) in the context of the People’s Republic of China.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample data of this study include 524 team members from 76 TMTs in east China’s Shanghai, Jiangsu, Zhejiang, Anhui provinces. IBM SPSS AMOS 22.0 software was employed for the data analysis.

Findings

The study finds that TMT internal and external processes have significant positive effects on HRM decision quality and satisfaction. The study further finds that TMT team trust partially mediates the relationship between TMT processes (internal and external processes) and HRM decision quality and satisfaction.

Practical implications

This research provides useful insights into the role of TMT team trust in enhancing managerial decision performance.

Originality/value

This study is among the limited studies that explore the influence of team trust in the relationship between TMT processes (internal and external processes) and HRM decision quality and satisfaction among TMTs in China. This study has extended TMT knowledge in mainstream management with guidelines on how to enhance organizational decision performance.

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Article

Ali Zeb, Nor Hazana Abdullah, Altaf Hussain and Adnan Safi

This paper aims to analyze the influence of authentic leadership on knowledge sharing and employee’s creativity through the mediating role of team environment of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyze the influence of authentic leadership on knowledge sharing and employee’s creativity through the mediating role of team environment of psychological safety and trust.

Design/methodology/approach

The participants in this study were 60 team leaders and 300 team members’ working in different Overseas Employment Promoters Agencies (OEPA) at Islamabad region, Pakistan. In addition to the authentic leadership of their supervisors, employees reported their perception of being psychologically safe and in the environment of team trust at work, whereas supervisors rated employee’s creativity at work areas. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was carried out using structural equation modelling (SEM) for validation of results among the variables.

Findings

The major findings of the study were (a) authentic leadership positively predicted knowledge sharing and employees’ creativity through the mediator’s role of team environment (psychological safety and team environment of trust), and (b) team environment of psychological safety and team environment of trust affected both the knowledge sharing and employee’s creativity.

Practical implications

Authentic leadership has to be synergized with environment of psychological safety and team environment of trust, to enhance employees’ creativity. The results of the study delineated practical applications for both the researchers and policymakers. The results of this study would also augment the body of knowledge on human resource practices in both developed and developing countries.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies to empirically examine the influence of authentic leadership on knowledge sharing and employee’s creativity through the mediator role of team environment of psychological safety and trust in OEPA in Pakistan.

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Article

Hidajat Hendarsjah, Ely Susanto, Bambang Riyanto Lies Sugianto and Tarsisius Hani Handoko

This paper aims to identify the relationship pattern between intra-team trust and team innovation and the influence of moderating variable task complexity on the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify the relationship pattern between intra-team trust and team innovation and the influence of moderating variable task complexity on the relationship. It also describes why and how intra-team trust is a unique antecedent for team innovation, as too much or too less influence of the variable can have detrimental effects on team innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses survey research. The data were collected by distributing questionnaires to work teams. After the individual-level data were aggregated into team-level data, hierarchical linier regression was conducted to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The paper provides empirical findings that (1) intra-team trust and team innovation have a curvilinear relationship pattern, (2) task complexity does not influence curvilinear relationship (3) and the increase in task complexity improves the possibility of team innovation to occur.

Research limitations/implications

The paper has two limitations. First, as intra-team trust was also represented by aggregated perception of team members’ trust for outside parties (not only members’ perception for their teams), the future research is expected to include the representation in the instrument. Second, recent research studies have shown that contextual factor of task interdependence, instead of task complexity, also had an effect on the relationship pattern between intra-team trust and team performance (i.e. team innovation). Therefore, for future researchers, it is suggested that the use of task interdependence would be an alternative moderating variable on the relationship between intra-team trust and team innovation.

Practical implications

The paper discusses the strategy to enhance team innovation by revealing strategies to manage interplay among intra-team trust, team complexity and the desired team innovation.

Originality/value

The paper identifies the need to conduct empirical research on how an interplay among intra-team trust, task complexity and team innovation could be enabled.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

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Article

Ipek Kocoglu, Gary Lynn, Yunho Jung, Peter G. Dominick, Zvi Aronson and Pamela Burke

The purpose of this paper is to expand our understanding on team listening by incorporating an action component. The authors empirically test the effect of this expanded…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to expand our understanding on team listening by incorporating an action component. The authors empirically test the effect of this expanded concept, namely team action listening on team success, and investigate how team commitment moderates the relationship between team trust and team action listening.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors explored listening in teams in the field and in the lab, both qualitatively and quantitatively, through studying 474 team members representing 100 teams. The authors tested the hypotheses by structural equation modeling augmented with in-depth team interviews.

Findings

The findings showed that: teams demonstrate that they listen by taking action, teams that exhibit action listening are more successful, there is a direct relationship between team trust and team action listening and team commitment negatively moderates this relation in larger teams.

Practical implications

Managers should encourage taking action in team discussions. Yet, they should be wary of the detrimental effects of team commitment to team action listening particularly in teams with high trust. Commitment increases the risk of groupthink and decreases the participation to team discussions and listening. In particular, managers may benefit from keeping the team smaller, as in large teams, commitment suppresses the relationship between trust and team action listening.

Originality/value

This study extends research on team listening by adding the action aspect that distinguishes successful teams. It is one of the first to investigate the interrelationships between team trust, commitment, team action listening and success in teams.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 58 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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