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Book part
Publication date: 2 September 2009

Sebastian Dieng, Christoph Dörrenbächer and Jens Gammelgaard

This chapter analyses the moves global brewery companies undertake towards the distribution of decision-making authority in their multinational organization and the…

Abstract

This chapter analyses the moves global brewery companies undertake towards the distribution of decision-making authority in their multinational organization and the likelihood of newly acquired subsidiaries to influence these moves. In this consumer goods industry, brands are suggested to be the primary subsidiary-specific resource to influence these distribution processes. Empirically, this chapter explores three European acquisitions of the Dutch brewery corporation Heineken in Switzerland, Slovakia, and France. We explore whether differing brand value (regional/international, standard/premium) has had an impact on the subsidiaries’ ability to maintain a certain degree of decision-making authority after the take-over. The results of our case studies show, however, that the ownership of valuable brands may not be considered as a critical resource for subsidiaries here.

Details

Advances in Mergers and Acquisitions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-781-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Sjoerd Beugelsdijk, Arjen Slangen and Marco van Herpen

This paper is based on the punctuated equilibrium model of organizational change. We argue that there are multiple ways in which organizational change takes place. More in…

Abstract

This paper is based on the punctuated equilibrium model of organizational change. We argue that there are multiple ways in which organizational change takes place. More in particular, by looking at the interaction between the two types of organizational change (radical and incremental), we identify two shapes of organizational change. We illustrate this by means of a case study of a large, Dutch beer‐brewing company. The study focuses on a major change in the distribution system of beer and a period of structural inertia, caused by long CEO tenure. The problems associated with the subsequent CEO succession and the different levels of management that interact in these change processes are also discussed. This leads to the identification of a number of drivers and determinants of shapes of organizational change.

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Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2013

José María González‐González and Constancio Zamora‐Ramírez

The purpose of this paper is to increase the knowledge about the strategies and actions that organisations are implementing to control and reduce their greenhouse gas…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to increase the knowledge about the strategies and actions that organisations are implementing to control and reduce their greenhouse gas emissions, as well as to identify and know the influence of the factors that can contribute to the consolidation of an organisational behaviour that is effective in the fight against climate change.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a case study conducted in Heineken Spain, which is primarily engaged in manufacturing and distributing beer, and some of its facilities are covered by the European Union – Emissions Trading System regulation. The results of this case study are analysed and interpreted according to institutional theory.

Findings

The paper illustrates the strategies developed by Heineken Spain in order to control and reduce their emissions and identifies these factors that are influencing on the consolidation of an effective practice in the fight against climate change: top management support, communication, training, formalization, technical/rational, internal supervision and consistency.

Originality/value

The paper reveals in‐depth the strategies and actions that have been implemented by an organization to fight against climate change. Also, this study allows managers to know the influence of the different factors affecting the stages of the consolidation process within the organization of an effective policy for the control and reduction of emissions, which is very useful for planning and evaluating during the process.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2003

In April 2002, the Chairman of Heineken, Karel Vuursten, handed over the reigns of the world’s third largest brewers to his long‐time number two Thony Ruys, and in doing…

Abstract

In April 2002, the Chairman of Heineken, Karel Vuursten, handed over the reigns of the world’s third largest brewers to his long‐time number two Thony Ruys, and in doing so spelt out a strong message of continuity to both employees and analysts alike. Although the potential for major mergers still looms in the background, Heineken seems content to continue its worldwide expansion (reflected in steadily increasing profits over recent years) through smaller acquisitions and partnerships.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Vicki R. Lane and Fernando Fastoso

Previous research warns against low-fit extensions as prone to causing negative spillover and, through it, harming the parent brand equity. Using the theory of…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous research warns against low-fit extensions as prone to causing negative spillover and, through it, harming the parent brand equity. Using the theory of schema-triggered affect and the link formation hypothesis, the purpose of this paper is to develop and tests predictions as to how negative spillover from low-fit extensions can be actively managed through repeated ad exposure.

Design/methodology/approach

A controlled experiment assesses the response of US consumers to the Dutch Heineken brand, a top 100 global brand, following sequential and repeated exposure to print ads depicting extensions for either Heineken wheat beer (i.e. a high-fit extension) or Heineken pretzels (i.e. a low-fit extension). Analytical methods include multiple regression, ANOVA, and t-tests.

Findings

The findings show that repeated ad exposure has a positive moderating effect on the magnitude of spillover from extension to brand. Second, the findings also show that repeated ad exposure changes the valence of spillover from low-fit extension to brand from negative to positive. In combination, the findings suggest that low-fit brand extensions can, when carefully managed, be a viable strategic option for market growth that is especially relevant for global brands.

Research limitations/implications

This research shows that repeated ad exposure can change the valence of spillover from low-fit extensions to the parent brand from negative to positive. Future research should extend the work by considering other brands and alternative tools that managers can use to make low-fit extensions a viable strategic choice.

Practical implications

This study finds, in contrast to previous research, that managers should indeed consider low-fit brand extensions as a viable strategic option for brand growth. This is possible because the findings show that repeated ad exposure can be used to control potential negative spillover from a low-fit extension to parent brand. This conclusion is particularly relevant for global brands, i.e. brands for which the opportunity costs of limiting global expansion and the financial investment necessary to establish a new brand with global appeal are substantial.

Originality/value

This paper differs from other spillover studies by manipulating repeated ad exposure, a mechanism which the authors theoretically link to spillover and which managers can also directly influence. In doing so, this paper offers a theoretical explanation and an empirical test of how negative spillover from low-fit extensions can be managed.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

How do the corporate universities operated by large multinationals ensure that everyone who enrolls on one of their classroom‐based courses begins at roughly the same…

Abstract

How do the corporate universities operated by large multinationals ensure that everyone who enrolls on one of their classroom‐based courses begins at roughly the same level and so can profit equally from valuable instructor‐contact time? This was the problem facing the brewing giant Heineken, whose 60,000 employees operating in 170 countries around the world have the right of access to courses at the Heineken University.

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Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1996

Genaro Cuomo and Claudio Vignali

Underlines that the development of a new European market for a UK company has to be strategically planned. Examines the introduction to the Dutch market of a particular…

Abstract

Underlines that the development of a new European market for a UK company has to be strategically planned. Examines the introduction to the Dutch market of a particular northern UK beer product, suggesting that the use of strategic tools and a traditional marketing plan is essential while the development of heuristic devices could point out the tactical path to follow.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 34 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1998

Demetris Vrontis

Seeks to emphasise the importance of branding in the European beer market. Attention is consigned to assessing the implications of effective branding within the context of…

Abstract

Seeks to emphasise the importance of branding in the European beer market. Attention is consigned to assessing the implications of effective branding within the context of the overall marketing strategies of brewers. To facilitate a comprehension of this, studies of three key players in the European beer market ‐ Bass plc, Carlsberg A/S, Heineken NV ‐ are utilised to exemplify the issues outlined. Practical applications of the product life cycle (PLC), and Boston Consulting Group Matrix (BCG) are then employed to illustrate the role of branding in product management within the competitive beer market. Reference to the European beer market is given at the beginning, as it facilitates a better understanding of the industry as a whole.

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British Food Journal, vol. 100 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Natalia Vuori and Tomi Laamanen

The authors extend the existing research on acquisition programs by identifying four types of acquisition programs that we call: cautious approach, political approach…

Abstract

The authors extend the existing research on acquisition programs by identifying four types of acquisition programs that we call: cautious approach, political approach, investment-intensive approach, and hybrid approach. The authors also provide a finer-grained distinction between various characteristics of these acquisition programs. Furthermore, when examining the performance of different types of acquisition programs, the authors found that an acquisition program has to be designed in a way that not only fits to the current environmental conditions in the host country, but also takes into account an acquirer’s acquisition capabilities and resources.

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Sarah Gee, Michael P. Sam and Steve J. Jackson

The purpose of this paper is to examine the nature, frequency, and duration of alcohol-related promotions and crowd alcohol consumption during major sports events…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the nature, frequency, and duration of alcohol-related promotions and crowd alcohol consumption during major sports events broadcasted on the SKY Sport network between September 2011 and February 2012.

Design/methodology/approach

Content analyses for various categories of alcohol-related images were conducted, including a novel inclusion of analysing crowd alcohol consumption.

Findings

The results provide empirical evidence that sponsorship and activation-related activities of alcohol brands subvert national regulations that ban alcohol advertising during daytime television programming.

Originality/value

The results serve to sensitise researchers, practitioners, policy makers, and regulators to the prevalence of incidental alcohol promotional material within the overall televised alcohol advertising mix and the broader societal exposure to such images. This research also informs readers that alcohol companies and media outlets produce alcohol-related marketing that may not be in-line with the meaning and/or intent of laws.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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