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Article
Publication date: 28 August 2007

Xiaoyu Yang, Philip R. Moore, Chi‐Biu Wong, Jun‐Sheng Pu and Seng Kwong Chong

This paper aims to capture and manage the product lifecycle data for consumer products, especially data that occur in distribution, usage, maintenance and end‐of‐life…

5591

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to capture and manage the product lifecycle data for consumer products, especially data that occur in distribution, usage, maintenance and end‐of‐life stages, and to use them to provide information and knowledge.

Design/methodology/approach

A lifecycle information acquisition and management model is proposed, and an information management system framework is formulated. The information management system developed is then used in actual field trials to manage lifecycle data for refrigeration products and game consoles.

Findings

It has been demonstrated that valuable services can be delivered through a lifecycle information management system.

Practical implications

Lifecycle information management systems can open new horizons for product design which are sustainable and environmentally sensitive. They also contribute to the wider exploration of eco‐design and development of next generation consumer products (e.g. smart home appliances).

Originality/value

Existing lifecycle information systems cannot support all phases of the product lifecycle. They mainly manage the lifecycle data only during the design and manufacture stages. Lifecycle data during distribution, usage, maintenance and end‐of‐life stages are usually hard to acquire and in most cases lost. The lifecycle information management system developed can capture them, and manage them in an integrated and systematic manner to provide information and knowledge.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 107 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 July 2013

Martin Hubert Ofner, Kevin Straub, Boris Otto and Hubert Oesterle

The purpose of the paper is to propose a reference model describing a holistic view of the master data lifecycle, including strategic, tactical and operational aspects…

3087

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to propose a reference model describing a holistic view of the master data lifecycle, including strategic, tactical and operational aspects. The Master Data Lifecycle Management (MDLM) map provides a structured approach to analyze the master data lifecycle.

Design/methodology/approach

Embedded in a design oriented research process, the paper applies the Component Business Model (CBM) method and suggests a reference model which identifies the business components required to manage the master data lifecycle. CBM is a patented IBM method to analyze the key components of a business domain. The paper uses a participative case study to evaluate the suggested model.

Findings

Based on a participative case study, the paper shows how the reference model makes it possible to analyze the master data lifecycle on a strategic, a tactical and an operational level, and how it helps identify areas of improvement.

Research limitations/implications

The paper presents design work and a participative case study. The reference model is grounded in existing literature and represents a comprehensive framework forming the foundation for future analysis of the master data lifecycle. Furthermore, the model represents an abstraction of an organization's master data lifecycle. Hence, it forms a “theory for designing”. More research is needed in order to more thoroughly evaluate the presented model in a variety of real‐life settings.

Practical implications

The paper shows how the reference model enables practitioners to analyze the master data lifecycle and how it helps identify areas of improvement.

Originality/value

The paper reports on an attempt to establish a holistic view of the master data lifecycle, including strategic, tactical and operational aspects, in order to provide more comprehensive support for its analysis and improvement.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 January 2022

Abbie Iveson, Magnus Hultman and Vasileios Davvetas

This paper aims to respond to calls in academia for an update of the product lifecycle (PLC). Through a systematic literature review, the authors provide an updated…

1659

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to respond to calls in academia for an update of the product lifecycle (PLC). Through a systematic literature review, the authors provide an updated agenda, which aims to advance the PLC concept in research, teaching and practice.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors started by surveying 101 marketing academics globally to ascertain whether a PLC update was viewed necessary and beneficial in the marketing community and thereafter conducted citation analysis of marketing research papers and textbooks to ascertain PLC usage. The subsequent literature review methodology was split into two sections. First, 97 empirical articles were reviewed based on an evaluative framework. Second, research pertaining to the PLC determinants were assessed and discussed.

Findings

From the results of this review and primary data from marketing academics, the authors find that the method of predicting the PLC based on past sales has been largely unsuccessful and perceived as somewhat outdated. However, a new stream of PLC literature is emerging, which takes a consumer-centric perspective to the PLC and has seen more success at modeling lifecycles in various industries.

Research limitations/implications

First, the study outlines the most contemporary and successful methodological approaches to modeling the PLC. Namely, the use of artificial intelligence, big data, demand modeling and consumer psychological mechanisms. Second, it provides several future research avenues using modern market trends such as sustainability, globalization, digitization and Covid-19 to push the PLC into the 21st century.

Originality/value

The PLC has shown to be resolutely popular in management application and education. However, without a continued effort in academic PLC research to update the knowledge around the concept, its use as a productive management tool will likely become outdated. This study provides a necessary and comprehensive literature update resulting in actionable future research and teaching agendas intended to advance the PLC concept into the modern market context.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 56 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 October 2014

Yufeng Zhang and Lihong Zhang

Strategic trends towards service operations have been widely reported in the recent literature, but organisational capabilities to support such service-centred strategies…

1116

Abstract

Purpose

Strategic trends towards service operations have been widely reported in the recent literature, but organisational capabilities to support such service-centred strategies are less well understood. The purpose of this paper is to identify key organisational issues in managing complex engineering service operations throughout the lifecycle.

Design/methodology/approach

Using instruments developed from the product lifecycle management technologies and the network configuration concept, key organisational issues for engineering service operations were identified through case studies focusing on complex engineering products and services systems across a variety of industrial sectors.

Findings

The case studies demonstrated different organisational features and strategic priorities of engineering service operations along the whole lifecycle. A generic trend has been observed for engineering systems to move from being design, development and manufacturing focused to embracing support and end-of-life recycling matters.

Originality/value

This paper provides an overall framework for integrating key organisational issues in engineering service operations. It contributes to the service literature by highlighting the need of developing appropriate organisational capabilities to support service-centred strategies with engineering cases. It also provides guidance for companies to manage their engineering network operations throughout the whole lifecycle of complex products and services systems.

Article
Publication date: 20 April 2012

Pierre Hadaya and Philippe Marchildon

This study attempts to expand knowledge of product lifecycle management (PLM) and supporting systems. Its objective is threefold: first, to identify and assess the impact…

4024

Abstract

Purpose

This study attempts to expand knowledge of product lifecycle management (PLM) and supporting systems. Its objective is threefold: first, to identify and assess the impact of two key PLM building blocks on new product performance. Second, to use the aforementioned PLM building blocks to highlight the distinctive nature of PLM and closed‐loop PLM systems. Third, to demonstrate that the closed‐loop PLM system provides more new product benefits than the PLM system and that the usage of the closed‐loop PLM system is positively related to new product development.

Design/methodology/approach

The research hypotheses were tested on data collected from 87 manufacturers in the transportation equipment manufacturing industry in one Canadian province.

Findings

The findings show that only ten manufacturers have adopted a closed‐loop PLM system. As expected, the results show that the two key PLM building blocks, namely operational integration and information system (IS) usage, are positively related to new product development. Findings also show that the level of forward operational integration is similar in the closed‐loop PLM system and in the PLM system, while the level of backward operational integration, the usage of the PLM system and new product development are higher in the closed‐loop PLM system. Finally, the results demonstrate that the usage of the closed‐loop PLM system is positively related to new product development.

Originality/value

This contribution should give academics and practitioners alike a better understanding of the role and benefits of PLM and its supporting systems (the PLM system and the closed‐loop PLM system).

Article
Publication date: 2 February 2010

Cecilia Maria Castelli and Alessandro Brun

The purpose of this paper is to assess the use of alignment practices between manufacturers and retailers; it focuses on the Italian fashion industry.

6071

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the use of alignment practices between manufacturers and retailers; it focuses on the Italian fashion industry.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach is adopted (case studies of fashion retailers in Italy), involving both documentary analysis and structured interviews with retail and store managers, with the aim of assessing the level of channel alignment between manufacturer and retailer.

Findings

The paper gives an overview of the extent to which fashion retailers in Italy pursue channel alignment; it suggests a relationship between the degree of alignment and two relevant drivers (channel type and lifecycle phase).

Research limitations/implications

A descriptive analysis with exploratory purpose is provided. The overall research plan includes expanding the analysis and final testing through quantitative methods.

Originality/value

The paper analyses the role of retail channel alignment in the fashion industry from an operational point of view; helps understanding the need for alignment with respect to channel type and lifecycle phase.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 September 2022

Jun Zhan, Ziyan Zhang, Shun Zhang, Jiabao Zhao and Fuhong Wang

Despite servitization being widely regarded as an essential catalyst to improve manufacturing firms' survival and competitiveness, how to attain servitization remains…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite servitization being widely regarded as an essential catalyst to improve manufacturing firms' survival and competitiveness, how to attain servitization remains debatable. The primary objective of this research is to explore whether or not, how, and when the dynamic capabilities affect servitization in the digital economy background. This research investigates the relationships between servitization and dynamic capabilities by incorporating firm ownership, firm lifecycle stage, digital economy level and environmental uncertainty as contingency factors in the research framework.

Design/methodology/approach

This research develops and verifies a conceptual framework for manufacturing servitization by employing the fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis (fsQCA) in analyzing the secondary longitudinal data from 148 China-listed manufacturing firms involved in servitization from 2015 to 2020.

Findings

The analytical results of fsQCA identify several configurational solutions for the success of manufacturing servitization. Each factor can be an enabler for servitization success despite none of the factors discovered as an absolute condition. Manufacturing servitization success within the digital economy depends on the interactions between dynamic capabilities and contingency factors such as digital economy level, environmental uncertainty, firm ownership, and lifecycle stage.

Research limitations/implications

All of the construct's measurements in this research adopt secondary data, and further investigation calls for primary data (e.g. survey) for higher validity.

Originality/value

This research extends the current view of servitization by proposing an integrative conceptual framework, allowing manufacturing servitization to be examined more pertinently and comprehensively. Second, the research is an initial attempt that adopts fsQCA in servitization studies. The study sheds light on the mechanisms of attaining servitization by revealing the importance of dynamic capabilities and their interactions with the contingency factors. Third, the research extends the application scopes of dynamic capability theory, firm lifecycle theory, contingency theory, and institutional theory. Fourth, the research findings enrich the understanding of servitization in the digital economy and give business practitioners insights on leveraging dynamic capabilities in different conditions to attain successful servitization under the current circumstances.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 September 2021

Ferran Vendrell-Herrero, Emanuel Gomes, Marco Opazo-Basaez and Oscar F. Bustinza

The purpose of this paper is to distinguish clearly between industry (ILC) and product lifecycle (PLC) models and to elucidate their different ramifications for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to distinguish clearly between industry (ILC) and product lifecycle (PLC) models and to elucidate their different ramifications for organizational learning and knowledge.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors examine existing knowledge on ILCs and PLCs to highlight the differences and similarities and develop a framework with implications for learning and innovation in digital manufacturing industries.

Findings

The authors identify and associate one dominant type of learning with each phase of the ILC: learning-by-participating in the introduction phase, learning-by-feedback in the growth phase, vicarious learning in the maturity phase and learning-by-memory in the decline phase. The study also provides insight into how different types of learning influence PLC in digital innovation. From this perspective, learning-by-feedback is crucial to co-creation, co-production and open innovation. Similarly, learning-by-doing and learning-by-memory are essential to production and usage stages, respectively.

Research limitations/implications

The conceptual development in this paper follows a somewhat critical but ultimately elucidative analysis that highlights important research avenues in the interplay of PLC/ILC, organizational learning and digital innovation.

Originality/value

This paper clarifies a perennial theoretical problem by differentiating two concepts often conflated in the literature. More importantly, it contributes to the knowledge management literature by shedding light on the connection of ILC and PLC theories to different types of organizational learning.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 January 2015

Mei-Fang Chen and Chia-Lin Lee

As huge environmental impacts caused by the coffee industry are significant and controversial in the course from cultivation to consumption, the purpose of this paper is…

7558

Abstract

Purpose

As huge environmental impacts caused by the coffee industry are significant and controversial in the course from cultivation to consumption, the purpose of this paper is to investigate whether or not different types of green claims based on the product lifecycle can lead to different extents of green psychological variables including purchase intention.

Design/methodology/approach

The green claims of Starbucks were chosen as the research target for this study not only because the coffee chain store is working on the “Starbucks” Shared Planet’ program, which makes a commitment to do business in ways that are good for people and the planet, but also because such a program can be categorized into three major green message elements on the basis of the product lifecycle. A total of 920 valid self-reported questionnaires collected in Taiwan were used for this empirical analysis.

Findings

One-way ANOVA results reveal that all of the three green claims of Starbucks can lead to consumers building up the same level of green brand image of this company, with “ethical sourcing” significantly possessing more impacts on the other green psychological variables (i.e. green trust, green satisfaction, green brand equity, and green purchase intention).

Practical implications

The empirical results and findings from this study are helpful to the coffee industry marketers if they, in formulating various promotion campaigns, can communicate with the consumers with an eye to increasing their green brand image and other green psychological variables, including green purchase intention.

Originality/value

This study is among the first to introduce different types of green claims on a basis of the product lifecycle to examine whether or not consumers’ green psychological variables will be different.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 117 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 April 2012

Boris Otto

The paper seeks to investigate the question as to how the business benefits of product data management (PDM) can be assessed and realized. In particular, it aims at…

2231

Abstract

Purpose

The paper seeks to investigate the question as to how the business benefits of product data management (PDM) can be assessed and realized. In particular, it aims at understanding the means‐end relationship between PDM and product data on the one hand and a company's business goals on the other hand.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a case study research approach. The case of Festo is unique and allows for detailed examination of both the business benefits of PDM and of the inter‐dependencies of various business benefit enablers. Due to the limited amount of scientific knowledge with regard to the management of PDM business benefits, the study is exploratory in nature. The conceptual framework used to guide the study combines business engineering concepts and the business dependency network technique.

Findings

The findings are threefold. First, the paper explicates and details the understanding of the nature of PDM business benefits. Second, it provides insight into the complexity and interdependency of various “means” – such as data ownership, product data standards, for example – and the “ends” of PDM, namely the contribution to a company's business goals. Third, the paper forms the baseline for a comprehensive method supporting the management of PDM business benefits.

Research limitations/implications

Single‐case studies require further validation of findings. Thus, future research should aim at replicating the findings and at developing a comprehensive method for the management of PDM business benefits.

Practical implications

Companies may take up the results as a “blueprint” for their own PDM activities and may reflect their own business benefits against the case of Festo.

Originality/value

The paper is one of the first contributions focusing on the means‐end relationship between PDM and product data on the one hand and a company's business goals on the other.

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