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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2004

Adam Fadlalla and Nilmini Wickramasinghe

Currently the healthcare industry in the US is not only contending with relentless pressures to lower costs while maintaining and increasing the quality of service but is…

1352

Abstract

Currently the healthcare industry in the US is not only contending with relentless pressures to lower costs while maintaining and increasing the quality of service but is also under a stringent timeline to become compliant with the health insurance, portability and accountability act (HIPAA) regulatory requirements. Robust healthcare information systems (HCIS) become critical to enabling healthcare organizations address these challenges. Hence, it becomes an imperative need that the information that is captured, generated and disseminated by these HCIS be of the highest possible integrity and quality as well as compliant with regulatory requirements. This paper addresses this need by proposing an integrative framework for HIPAA compliant, I*IQ HCIS. It bases this framework on an integration of the requirements for HIPAA compliance, the principles of information integrity, as well as the healthcare quality aims set forth by the Committee on the Quality of Healthcare in America.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 30 September 2020

Tawseef Ayoub Shaikh and Rashid Ali

Tremendous measure of data lakes with the exponential mounting rate is produced by the present healthcare sector. The information from differing sources like electronic…

Abstract

Tremendous measure of data lakes with the exponential mounting rate is produced by the present healthcare sector. The information from differing sources like electronic wellbeing record, clinical information, streaming information from sensors, biomedical image data, biomedical signal information, lab data, and so on brand it substantial as well as mind-boggling as far as changing information positions, which have stressed the abilities of prevailing regular database frameworks in terms of scalability, storage of unstructured data, concurrency, and cost. Big data solutions step in the picture by harnessing these colossal, assorted, and multipart data indexes to accomplish progressively important and learned patterns. The reconciliation of multimodal information seeking after removing the relationship among the unstructured information types is a hotly debated issue these days. Big data energizes in triumphing the bits of knowledge from these immense expanses of information. Big data is a term which is required to take care of the issues of volume, velocity, and variety generally seated in the medicinal services data. This work plans to exhibit a survey of the writing of big data arrangements in the medicinal services part, the potential changes, challenges, and accessible stages and philosophies to execute enormous information investigation in the healthcare sector. The work categories the big healthcare data (BHD) applications in five broad categories, followed by a prolific review of each sphere, and also offers some practical available real-life applications of BHD solutions.

Details

Big Data Analytics and Intelligence: A Perspective for Health Care
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-099-8

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 5 May 2021

Hamed Ahmadinia, Kristina Eriksson-Backa and Shahrokh Nikou

Immigrants, asylum seekers and refugees living in Europe face a number of challenges in accessing or using health information and healthcare services available in their…

2066

Abstract

Purpose

Immigrants, asylum seekers and refugees living in Europe face a number of challenges in accessing or using health information and healthcare services available in their host countries. To resolve these issues and deliver the necessary services, providers must take a comprehensive approach to better understand the types of health information and healthcare services that these individuals need, seek and use. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to develop that comprehensive approach.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, a systematic literature review of peer-reviewed publications was performed, with 3.013 articles collected from various databases. A total of 57 qualifying papers on studies conducted in Europe were included in the review after applying the predefined inclusion and exclusion requirements, screening processes and eliminating duplicates. The information seeking and communication model (ISCM) was used in the analysis.

Findings

The findings revealed that while many health information and healthcare services are accessible in Europe for immigrants, asylum seekers and refugees, many of these individuals are unaware of their existence or how to access them. While our findings do not specify what health-related information these groups need, use or seek, they do suggest the importance and value of providing mental health, sexual health and HIV, as well as pregnancy and childbirth information and services. Furthermore, according to our results, health information services should be fact-based, easy to understand and raise awareness about healthcare structure and services available in Europe for this vulnerable population.

Practical implications

This study has a range of practical implications, including (1) highlighting the need for mental health and behavioural health services and (2) stressing the value of addressing cultural context and religious values while investigating (health) information seeking of people with foreign background.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies to systematically review and examine the behaviour of immigrants, asylum seekers and refugees in relation to health information and healthcare services in the European context.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 78 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 March 2013

Jaap van den Heuvel, Gerard C. Niemeijer and Ronald J.M.M. Does

Current health care quality performance indicators appear to be inadequate to inform the public to make the right choices. The aim of this paper is to define a framework…

3857

Abstract

Purpose

Current health care quality performance indicators appear to be inadequate to inform the public to make the right choices. The aim of this paper is to define a framework and an organizational setting in which valid and reliable healthcare information can be produced to inform the general public about healthcare quality.

Design/methodology/approach

To improve health care quality information, the paper explores the analogy between financial accounting, which aims to produce valid and reliable information to support companies informing their shareholders and stakeholders, and healthcare aiming to inform future patients about healthcare quality. Based on this analogy, the authors suggest a measurement framework and an organizational setting to produce healthcare information.

Findings

The authors suggest a five‐quality element framework to structure quality reporting. The authors also indicate the best way to report each type of quality, comparing performance indicators with certification/accreditation. Health gain is the most relevant quality indicator to inform the public, but this information is the most difficult to obtain. Finally, the organizational setting, comparable to financial accounting, required to provide valid, reliable and objective information on healthcare quality is described.

Practical implications

Framework elements should be tested in quantitative studies or case studies, such as a performance indicator's relative value compared to accreditation/ certification. There are, however, elements that can be implemented right away such as third party validation of healthcare information produced by healthcare institutions.

Originality/value

Given the money spent on healthcare worldwide, valid and reliable healthcare quality information's value can never be overestimated. It can justify delivering “expensive” healthcare, but also points the way to savings by stopping useless healthcare. Valid and reliable information puts the patient in the driver's seat and enables him or her to make the right decision when choosing their healthcare provider.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 June 2009

Mina Deng, Danny De Cock and Bart Preneel

Modern e‐health systems incorporate different healthcare providers in one system and provide an electronic platform to share medical information efficiently. In…

1153

Abstract

Purpose

Modern e‐health systems incorporate different healthcare providers in one system and provide an electronic platform to share medical information efficiently. In cross‐context communications between healthcare providers, the same information can be interpreted as different types or values, so that one patient will be issued different identifiers by different healthcare providers. This paper aims to provide a solution to ensure interoperability so that multiple healthcare providers will be able to collaborate in one e‐health system.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper primarily focuses on how different healthcare providers, instead of the patients, are able to interact and share information on a common e‐health platform.

Findings

In the course of the work, it was found that previous e‐health solutions mainly have a limited view of patient information, where a user‐centric approach for identity management is usually restricted to a single healthcare provider. Interoperability in an e‐health system becomes more problematic when more actors collaborate, and hence linkability from one context to another should not be straightforward. However, some form of linkability, such as the possibility to follow up a patient's medical treatment, is desirable in the e‐health sector, even when it needs to cross different contexts. Therefore, the authors have designed an identity management mechanism to ensure semantic interoperability when data is exchanged among different authorized healthcare providers.

Research limitations/implications

The paper points out that the next generation of e‐health will move towards federated e‐health and will require user‐centricity and transparency properties so that patients are able to specify and verify the disclosure of their medical information.

Originality/value

This paper proposes a new service for cross‐context identity management in e‐health systems, improving interoperability between agencies when context‐specific information is transferred from one healthcare provider to another. How the proposed cross‐context identity management service can be integrated in an e‐health system is explained with a use case scenario.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1996

JENNIFER MACDOUGALL, J. MICHAEL BRITTAIN and ROBERT GANN

This paper provides an overview of the range and development of health informatics, with examples from the literature world wide covering the types of information

Abstract

This paper provides an overview of the range and development of health informatics, with examples from the literature world wide covering the types of information involved, the areas of application, the impact of evidence based medicine and other professional issues, integrated information systems, and the needs of the public, patients and their carers. While medical informatics certainly comprises a major part of health informatics it is not the main focus of this paper. Medical informatics is the older term and involves the use of information technology and computing specifically for medical science research, and the diagnosis and treatment of disease involving, for example, X‐rays, imaging, resonance, and magnetic scanning techniques. Rather, the scope of this review is the literature relating to the wider concept of the management of information through the interdisciplinary application of information science and technology for the benefit of patients, scientists, managers, staff, and carers involved in the whole range of healthcare activity.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 52 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Article
Publication date: 27 November 2007

Avinandan Mukherjee and John McGinnis

Healthcare is among the fastest‐growing sectors in both developed and emerging economies. E‐healthcare is contributing to the explosive growth within this industry by…

2958

Abstract

Purpose

Healthcare is among the fastest‐growing sectors in both developed and emerging economies. E‐healthcare is contributing to the explosive growth within this industry by utilizing the internet and all its capabilities to support its stakeholders with information searches and communication processes. The purpose of this paper is to present the state‐of‐the‐art and to identify key themes in research on e‐healthcare.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of the literature in the marketing and management of e‐healthcare was conducted to determine the major themes pertinent to e‐healthcare research as well as the commonalities and differences within these themes.

Findings

Based on the literature review, the five major themes of e‐healthcare research identified are: cost savings; virtual networking; electronic medical records; source credibility and privacy concerns; and physician‐patient relationships.

Originality/value

Based on these major themes, managerial implications for e‐healthcare are formulated. Suggestions are offered to facilitate healthcare service organizations' attempts to further implement and properly utilize e‐healthcare in their facilities. These propositions will also help these stakeholders develop and streamline their e‐healthcare processes already in use. E‐healthcare systems enable firms to improve efficiency, to reduce costs, and to facilitate the coordination of care across multiple facilities.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 February 2019

Xiao-Ling Jin, Zhongyun Zhou and Xiaoyu Yu

The purpose of this paper is to investigate why users are willing to diffuse healthcare knowledge in social media by drawing on the communicative ecology theory (CET) and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate why users are willing to diffuse healthcare knowledge in social media by drawing on the communicative ecology theory (CET) and prior research on interpersonal communication.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper conducts a large-scale scenario-based online survey in WeChat (the most popular social media platform in China) to test the proposed research model and hypotheses. The final data set consists of 1,039 useful responses from WeChat users.

Findings

The results indicate that interestingness, emotionality and institution-based trust are the strongest antecedents in predicting healthcare knowledge-diffusing likelihood, followed by usefulness, source credibility and positivity. Further, the relationship between institution-based trust and healthcare knowledge-diffusing likelihood is partially mediated by source credibility.

Practical implications

Healthcare practitioners who seek to motivate individuals to disseminate healthcare knowledge need to phrase or frame healthcare knowledge in a way that draws greater interest, evokes stronger emotion, increases perceived usefulness or reflects positively on themselves. Healthcare organizations should also pay attention to strengthening users’ trust in the platform and source-related information that can indicate source authority.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to investigate the dissemination of healthcare knowledge in the context of social media (WeChat in particular). Compared with other types of information, healthcare knowledge is more scientific and professional to the extent that most laypersons do not have relevant expertise to directly evaluate whether the content is credible and of high quality. Rather, their sharing likelihood is dependent more on other factors than perceived information quality and credibility; those factors include platform-related factors that may play an important role but has been overlooked in prior literature on interpersonal communication. By combining CET with interpersonal communication-related research and including institution-based trust as an important determinant of healthcare knowledge dissemination, this study provides a comprehensive analysis of healthcare knowledge diffusion process.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 August 2009

Eva Söderström, Rose‐Mharie Åhlfeldt and Nomie Eriksson

Regardless of who or where we are and when we get sick, we expect healthcare to make us well and to handle us and our information with care and respect. Today, most…

Abstract

Purpose

Regardless of who or where we are and when we get sick, we expect healthcare to make us well and to handle us and our information with care and respect. Today, most healthcare institutions work separately, making the flow of patient information sub‐optimal and the use of common standards practically unheard of. The purpose of this paper is to emphasise the use for standards to improve information security in process‐oriented distributed healthcare.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper introduces a real‐life case which is analysed to highlight how and where standards can and should be used in order to improve information security in process‐oriented distributed healthcare.

Findings

In total, 11 flaws or problems in information security and process‐orientation are identified. From these, six changes are suggested which address how information is handled, and how organizational routines should be standardized.

Research limitations/implications

The case setting is Swedish healthcare, but problems can be shared across international borders. The purpose is to highlight the issues at hand.

Practical implications

If suggested changes are implemented, healthcare processes will be more streamlined and focused on patients. Routines will be standardized and uncertainties thus removed in terms of how to act in certain situations.

Originality/value

Healthcare and academia has yet to address both document and process issues concerning standardization in distributed healthcare. There are also few actual cases from a patient perspective. This paper provides lessons learned from a real‐life case, where results may impact how standardization is addressed in healthcare organizations.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 June 2012

Rhonda J. Richards, Victor R. Prybutok and Sherry D. Ryan

The purpose of this article is to present a conceptual model that posits the strategic relationships between information technology, clinic operations and physicians and…

4946

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to present a conceptual model that posits the strategic relationships between information technology, clinic operations and physicians and the subsequent outcomes to patients, physicians and clinics which can lead to competitive advantages in the healthcare environment.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on a review of the literature and proposes a conceptual model of the strategic relationships essential for success. The scope of the paper is based on the legal, economic and political triggers impacting the strategic relationship between electronic medical records, clinic interoperability and physicians as owners/users.

Findings

The paper presents the formation of a conceptual model which identifies the strategic alignment between clinics, physicians and information technology, more specifically, electronic medical records.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is limited in that it is not an empirical investigation but a conceptual model of future research endeavours. Future research endeavours should seek empirical findings related to the relationships proposed in the model.

Practical implications

Physicians, clinics and patients should be aware of the impact electronic medical records have on the health environment as well as the potential competitiveness due to health consumerism enabled by electronic medical records.

Social implications

Electronic medical records, personal health records and electronic health records are infiltrating society; subsequently health consumers should determine how this technology may impact their healthcare.

Originality/value

The value of this paper is to provide a conceptual model as a basis for future empirical research and awareness of changes in the competitiveness of the healthcare environment.

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 30000