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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Mauro Falasca, Scott Dellana, William J. Rowe and John F. Kros

This study develops and tests a model exploring the relationship between supply chain (SC) counterfeit risk management and performance in the healthcare supply chain (HCSC).

Abstract

Purpose

This study develops and tests a model exploring the relationship between supply chain (SC) counterfeit risk management and performance in the healthcare supply chain (HCSC).

Design/methodology/approach

In the proposed theoretical model, HCSC counterfeit risk management is characterized by HCSC counterfeit risk orientation (HCRO), HCSC counterfeit risk mitigation (HCRM) and HCSC risk management integration (HRMI), while performance is represented by healthcare logistics performance (HLP) and healthcare organization overall performance (HOP). Partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) and survey data from 55 HCSC managers are used to test the research hypotheses.

Findings

HCRO has a significant positive effect on HCRM, while HCRM has a positive impact on HRMI. With respect to HLP, HCRM has a nonsignificant effect, while HRMI has a significant impact, thus confirming the important mediating role of HRMI. Finally, HLP has a significant positive effect on the overall performance of healthcare organizations.

Research limitations/implications

All study participants were from the United States, limiting the generalizability of the study findings to different countries or regions. The sample size employed in the study did not allow the authors to distinguish among the different types of healthcare organizations.

Originality/value

This study delineates between a healthcare organization's philosophy toward counterfeiting risks vs actions taken to eliminate or reduce the impact of counterfeiting on the HCSC. By offering firm-level guidance for managers, this study informs healthcare organizations about addressing the challenge of counterfeiting in the HCSC.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 7 May 2020

Naziah Muhamad Salleh, Nuzaihan Aras Agus Salim, Mastura Jaafar, Mohd Zailan Sulieman and Andrew Ebekozien

There is increasing recognition amongst healthcare providers on the necessity to improve fire safety management in healthcare facilities. This is possibly not yet…

Abstract

Purpose

There is increasing recognition amongst healthcare providers on the necessity to improve fire safety management in healthcare facilities. This is possibly not yet satisfactory because of recent fire incidents in Asia. This paper set out to analyse the literature because of the paucity of systematic reviews on fire safety management of public healthcare facilities and proffer preventive measures.

Design/methodology/approach

Thirty related studies were identified with the support of the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses via Scopus and Web of Science databases.

Findings

Influencing factors, hindrances to fire safety management and preventive measures for fire-related occurrence in Asian hospital buildings were the three themes that emerged from the reviewed. The factors that influence fire in Asian hospital buildings were categorised into technical, management and legislation factors.

Research limitations/implications

The recommendations of this paper were based on literature that was systematically reviewed but does not compromise the robustness concerning fire safety management in hospital buildings across Asian countries. Much is needed to be known regarding fire safety in healthcare buildings across Asian countries. This paper recommended exploratory sequential mixed-methods approach as part of the implications for further studies. This will allow in-depth face-to-face interviews and increase the generalisability of future findings concerning fire safety management in hospital buildings across Asian countries to a larger population.

Practical implications

As part of the practical implications, this paper recommends fire safety management plan as one of the practical possible measures for addressing technical, management and legislation factors. Also recommended is training and fire safety education of healthcare staff in collaboration with safety firefighters to address major issues that may arise from management factors. The government should upgrade the safety technology equipment in healthcare facilities as part of measures to mitigate issues concerning technical and legislation factors. Also, the identified factors are part of the theoretical contributions to the advancement of knowledge and this brings to the front burners new opening.

Originality/value

This is probably the first systematic review paper on fire safety hospital buildings in Asia.

Details

Property Management, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 6 September 2018

Afsaneh Roshanghalb, Emanuele Lettieri, Davide Aloini, Lorella Cannavacciuolo, Simone Gitto and Filippo Visintin

This manuscript discusses the main findings gathered through a systematic literature review aimed at crystallizing the state of art about evidence-based management (EBMgt…

Abstract

Purpose

This manuscript discusses the main findings gathered through a systematic literature review aimed at crystallizing the state of art about evidence-based management (EBMgt) in healthcare. The purpose of this paper is to narrow the main gaps in current understanding about the linkage between sources of evidence, categories of analysis and kinds of managerial decisions/management practices that different groups of decision-makers put in place. In fact, although EBMgt in healthcare has emerging as a fashionable research topic, little is still known about its actual implementation.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the Scopus database as main source of evidence, the authors carried out a systematic literature review on EBMgt in healthcare. Inclusion and exclusion criteria have been crystallized and applied. Only empirical journal articles and past reviews have been included to consider only well-mature and robust studies. A theoretical framework based on a “process” perspective has been designed on these building blocks: inputs (sources of evidence), processes/tools (analyses on the sources of evidence), outcomes (the kind of the decision) and target users (decision-makers).

Findings

Applying inclusion/exclusion criteria, 30 past studies were selected. Of them, ten studies were past literature reviews conducted between 2009 and 2014. Their main focus was discussing the previous definitions for EBMgt in healthcare, the main sources of evidence and their acceptance in hospitals. The remaining studies (n=20, 67 percent) were empirical; among them, the largest part (n=14, 70 percent) was informed by quantitative methodologies. The sources of evidence for EBMgt are: published studies, real world evidence and experts’ opinions. Evidence is analyzed through: literature reviews, data analysis of empirical studies, workshops with experts. Main kinds of decisions are: performance assessment of organization units, staff performance assessment, change management, organizational knowledge transfer and strategic planning.

Originality/value

This study offers original insights on EBMgt in healthcare by adding to what we know from previous studies a “process” perspective that connects sources of evidence, types of analysis, kinds of decisions and groups of decision-makers. The main findings are useful for academia as they consolidate what we know about EBMgt in healthcare and pave avenues for further research to consolidate this emerging discipline. They are also useful for practitioners, as hospital managers, who might be interested to design and implement EBMgt initiatives to improve hospital performance.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 56 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 21 September 2012

Peter E. Hilsenrath

This paper aims to provide a history of graduate healthcare management education in the USA with an emphasis on the comparison of business schools and health science…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a history of graduate healthcare management education in the USA with an emphasis on the comparison of business schools and health science settings. It seeks to explain why different organizational cultures exist and how this affects education.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach relies on literature review and descriptive analysis using secondary data. Institutional economics helps provide perspective on different academic cultures and orientations.

Findings

Healthcare management education originated in the early twentieth century. Business schools at the University of Chicago and Northwestern were early pioneers. By mid‐century, schools of public health and medicine entered and came to dominate with strong graduate programs at Berkeley, Michigan and other leading universities. More recently, business schools have differentiated away from the generic MBA and expanded into this market. Advocates of health science settings commonly see healthcare as different from other forms of management. The externally funded model of medical education relying on patient and grant revenues dominates the health sciences. This can lead to preference for faculty who generate funds and a neglect of core academic areas that historically have not relied on grants and contracts.

Practical implications

This history of health management education provides insight for students, researchers, educators and administrators. It underscores comparative advantage of different academic settings.

Originality/value

This paper serves to fill a gap in the management literature. It provides history and perspective about academic settings not readily available.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2011

Jerry D. VanVactor

The purpose of this paper is to present a collaborative communications model developed during the conduct of a recent academic research study and provide information to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a collaborative communications model developed during the conduct of a recent academic research study and provide information to healthcare supply chain managers and administrators.

Design/methodology/approach

Using data collected from a case study involving healthcare supply chain managers in the United States Army, this work examines how collaborative communications is linked to healthcare supply chain management. The findings associated with this study may have many transferable applications to institutions beyond a military health services context.

Findings

This paper presents the findings and conclusions ascertained during a case study of collaborative communications. Five emerging themes were identified and a management model was developed for the enhancement of healthcare supply chain operations. Emerging themes included synergy among organizations, stakeholders working together, enhancements in supply chain operations, a continuance of training for supply chain leaders, and commonalities among disparate levels of management.

Practical implications

Healthcare is a continually evolving industry. Supply chain efficiency can be linked to potential cost savings and more efficient operations within healthcare organizations. By understanding a model related to communicating collaboratively, leaders begin to understand the need for partnering among internal and external stakeholders and creating more efficient practices and processes. While this discussion is directed specifically toward healthcare management, the principles are applicable across a wide array of industries.

Social implications

Communicating effectively is never easy for any healthcare organization or staff. Whether isolated to key individuals or throughout the entire organization, leaders have an inherent responsibility to share information and set conditions for organizational success. Arguably, the critical path to success involves effective, collaborative communications across multiple echelons of management responsibilities.

Originality/value

While there is a dearth of literature examining communications and collaboration among various industries, little information is directed specifically toward the management of healthcare organizations or supply chain operations. In an applied sense, this model provides healthcare supply chain managers with concepts related to communicating more effectively at both the individual and organizational levels.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Ali Mohammad Mosadeghrad

– The purpose of this paper is to develop a total quality management (TQM) model for healthcare organisations and validate it using a sample of Iranian healthcare organisations.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a total quality management (TQM) model for healthcare organisations and validate it using a sample of Iranian healthcare organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

A validated questionnaire was used to collect data from all healthcare organisations that implemented TQM in Isfahan province, Iran.

Findings

Using the proposed model, TQM implementation was measured in healthcare organisations. The level of TQM success in Isfahan healthcare organisations was medium. The highest score was achieved in the dimension of “customer management”, followed by “leadership” and “employee management”. Employee management, information management, customer management, process management and leadership had the most positive effect on TQM success. Using a series of quality management techniques had “synergistic” effect on TQM success.

Practical implications

Top management support, effective management of human resources, full involvement of the entire workforce including physicians, education and training, team working, continuous improvement, a corporate quality culture, customer focus and using a combination of management techniques under a quality management system are necessary for TQM successful implementation.

Originality/value

A healthcare context-specific model of TQM was developed and tested and suggestions were provided for its successful implementation.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1996

JENNIFER MACDOUGALL, J. MICHAEL BRITTAIN and ROBERT GANN

This paper provides an overview of the range and development of health informatics, with examples from the literature world wide covering the types of information…

Abstract

This paper provides an overview of the range and development of health informatics, with examples from the literature world wide covering the types of information involved, the areas of application, the impact of evidence based medicine and other professional issues, integrated information systems, and the needs of the public, patients and their carers. While medical informatics certainly comprises a major part of health informatics it is not the main focus of this paper. Medical informatics is the older term and involves the use of information technology and computing specifically for medical science research, and the diagnosis and treatment of disease involving, for example, X‐rays, imaging, resonance, and magnetic scanning techniques. Rather, the scope of this review is the literature relating to the wider concept of the management of information through the interdisciplinary application of information science and technology for the benefit of patients, scientists, managers, staff, and carers involved in the whole range of healthcare activity.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 52 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2013

Patience Aseweh Abor

– The paper aims to examine the healthcare waste management practices of selected hospitals in Ghana.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to examine the healthcare waste management practices of selected hospitals in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a multiple case approach, using two public and two private hospitals.

Findings

Findings indicate that both public hospitals and one private hospital have a waste management policy. Public and private hospitals have waste management plans and waste management teams. Public hospitals were found to generate more waste than the private hospitals. One private hospital and the public hospitals segregate their waste into different categories. This is done by first identifying the waste type and then separating non-infectious or general waste from infectious waste. Both public and private hospitals have internal storage facilities for temporarily storing the waste before they are finally disposed off-site. On-site transportation in the public hospitals is done by using wheelbarrows, while covered bins with wheels are used to transport waste on-site in the private hospitals. In public and private hospitals, off-site transportation of the hospital waste is undertaken by Municipal Assemblies with the use of trucks. Both public and private hospitals employ standard methods for disposing of healthcare waste.

Originality/value

The article provides insights into healthcare waste management from a Ghanaian perspective.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2013

Ali Mohammad Mosadeghrad

Many healthcare organisations have found it difficult to implement total quality management (TQM) successfully. The aim of this paper is to explore the barriers to TQM…

Abstract

Purpose

Many healthcare organisations have found it difficult to implement total quality management (TQM) successfully. The aim of this paper is to explore the barriers to TQM successful implementation in the healthcare sector.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reports a literature review exploring the major reasons for the failure of TQM programmes in healthcare organisations.

Findings

TQM implementation and its impact depend heavily on the ability of managers to adopt and adapt its values and concepts in professional healthcare organisations. Unsuccessful TQM efforts in healthcare organisations can be attributed to the strongly departmentalised, bureaucratic and hierarchical structure, professional autonomy, tensions between managers and professionals and the difficulties involved in evaluating healthcare processes and outcomes. Other obstacles to TQM success include lack of consistent managers' and employees' commitment to and involvement in TQM implementation, poor leadership and management, lack of a quality‐oriented culture, insufficient training, and inadequate resources. The review was limited to empirical articles written in the English language during the past 30 years (1980‐2010).

Practical implications

The findings of this article provide policy makers and managers with a practical understanding of the factors that are likely to obstruct TQM implementation in the healthcare sector.

Originality/value

Understanding the factors that obstruct TQM implementation would enable managers to develop more effective strategies for implementing TQM successfully in healthcare organisations.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2019

Hossam Elamir

The growing importance of risk management programmes and practices in different industries has given rise to a new risk management approach, i.e. enterprise risk management

Abstract

Purpose

The growing importance of risk management programmes and practices in different industries has given rise to a new risk management approach, i.e. enterprise risk management. The purpose of this paper is to better understand the necessity, benefit, approaches and methodologies of managing risks in healthcare. It compares and contrasts between the traditional and enterprise risk management approaches within the healthcare context. In addition, it introduces bow tie methodology, a prospective risk assessment tool proposed by the American Society for Healthcare Risk Management as a visual risk management tool used in enterprise risk management.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a critical review of published literature on the topics of governance, patient safety, risk management, enterprise risk management and bow tie, which aims to draw a link between them and find the benefits behind their adoption.

Findings

Enterprise risk management is a generic holistic approach that extends the benefits of risk management programme beyond the traditional insurable hazards and/or losses. In addition, the bow tie methodology is a barrier-based risk analysis and management tool used in enterprise risk management for critical events related to the relevant day-to-day operations. It is a visual risk assessment tool which is used in many higher reliability industries. Nevertheless, enterprise risk management and bow ties are reported with limited use in healthcare.

Originality/value

The paper suggests the applicability and usefulness of enterprise risk management to healthcare, and proposes the bow tie methodology as a proactive barrier-based risk management tool valid for enterprise risk management implementation in healthcare.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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