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Article
Publication date: 19 February 2021

Chris Welter, Alex Scrimpshire, Dawn Tolonen and Eseoghene Obrimah

The goal of this research is to investigate the relationship between two different sets of practices, lean startup and business planning, and their relation to…

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2105

Abstract

Purpose

The goal of this research is to investigate the relationship between two different sets of practices, lean startup and business planning, and their relation to entrepreneurial performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collected data from 120 entrepreneurs across the US about a variety of new venture formation activities within the categories of lean startup or business planning. They use hierarchical regression to examine the relationship between these activities and new venture performance using both a subjective and objective measure of performance.

Findings

The results show that talking to customers, collecting preorders and pivoting based on customer feedback are lean startup activities correlated with performance; writing a business plan is the sole business planning activity correlated with performance.

Research limitations/implications

This research lays the foundation for understanding the components of both lean startup and business planning. Moreover, these results demonstrate that the separation of lean startup and business planning represents a false dichotomy.

Practical implications

These findings suggest that entrepreneurs should engage in some lean startup activities and still write a business plan.

Originality/value

This article offers the first quantitative, empirical comparison of lean startup activities and business planning. Furthermore, it provides support for the relationship between specific lean startup activities and firm performance.

Details

New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2574-8904

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2015

Mark Bieraugel

The purpose of this paper is to argue the case that libraries should use the lean startup method for developing, managing and launching radically innovative services or…

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4843

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to argue the case that libraries should use the lean startup method for developing, managing and launching radically innovative services or products.

Design/methodology/approach

Libraries need to innovate but do not have the management structure to handle the extreme uncertainty in implementing radical innovations. This paper examines the lean startup method for managing innovation, explores how it differs from traditional management tools, outlines the reasons for and barriers to innovation in libraries and highlights the new tools required to manage innovation. This paper also discusses the culture of innovation in libraries and how libraries innovate. The lean startup method is examined through the lens of a variety of innovation models.

Findings

The lean startup method for managing radical innovations is shown to be a sound alternative to traditional library management methods.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the few to examine a practical method for librarians to manage radical innovations in academic libraries.

Details

Library Management, vol. 36 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2019

Ryall Carroll and R. Mitch Casselman

Uncertainty in the early development of digital business startups can benefit from data-driven testing of hypotheses. Startups face uncertainty not only in product…

Abstract

Purpose

Uncertainty in the early development of digital business startups can benefit from data-driven testing of hypotheses. Startups face uncertainty not only in product development, but also over the structure of the business model and the nature of the customer or market to address. The authors conceptualize a new model, the Lean Discovery Process (LDP), which focuses on market-based testing from the early business idea through to fully realized product stages of an innovation. The purpose of this paper is to highlight a methodology to help digital business reduce uncertainty and apply lean principles as early as possible in the development of a business concept.

Design/methodology/approach

Examining literature in lean startups, lean user experience and lean software development, the authors highlight underlying assumptions of existing lean models. The authors then examine the LDP using the case of raiserve, a social entrepreneurship startup that focuses on the management of cause-based voluntary service.

Findings

Existing literature focuses on product development against an assumed customer base. Early hypothesis testing can be applied to business concept development to substantially reduce cost and time to market.

Research limitations/implications

Further investigation of different forms of uncertainty in digital startups can open up opportunities to further apply lean methodologies. A more extensive empirical study to measure the potential impact is warranted.

Originality/value

The authors conceptualize the minimum viable customer and support early testing with concepts from market research and collective intelligence. The authors demonstrate early opportunities to apply lean principles and rigorous hypothesis testing in an LDP that results in significant reductions in time and expense of product development.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 26 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2020

Diego Souza Silva, Antonio Ghezzi, Rafael Barbosa de Aguiar, Marcelo Nogueira Cortimiglia and Carla Schwengber ten Caten

Startups have attracted increased attention over the past years. While entrepreneurs develop startups to capture new business opportunities, also large companies are…

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3195

Abstract

Purpose

Startups have attracted increased attention over the past years. While entrepreneurs develop startups to capture new business opportunities, also large companies are turning to these fast-growing organizations in efforts to become more agile. However, managing business model innovation and validation is challenging. A number of methodologies, like the Lean Startup (LS), emerged to reduce uncertainties concerning innovation-based projects, and to contribute to business model validation. Despite its popularity, the literature on the LS and its key underpinnings (Agile Methodologies and Customer Development) is sparse, lacking an integrated and structured analysis of their impacts and potentialities. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a comprehensive systematic literature review on the topic fully analyzing a final set of 71 papers.

Findings

There is a turning point in the research stream’s maturity with publications in conferences and major journals, with the predominance of empirical investigations in the European region. Articles on the topic are on the rise in several technology fields. However, the literature on the subject falls short on providing guidance to assist practitioners and scholars on the adoption and investigation of these methodologies.

Practical implications

The paper provides guidance for practice by presenting a staircase roadmap for the LS implementation drawing from the final set of papers reviewed.

Originality/value

The study categorizes the current literature through a concept map, and offers a structured research agenda beyond the categories from the thematic analysis.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 7 February 2019

Raffaello Balocco, Angelo Cavallo, Antonio Ghezzi and Jasmina Berbegal-Mirabent

Business model change (BMC) is a process new ventures are frequently involved in, especially in dynamic environments like the digital industry: copying with it is a key…

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2253

Abstract

Purpose

Business model change (BMC) is a process new ventures are frequently involved in, especially in dynamic environments like the digital industry: copying with it is a key issue for entrepreneurs attempting to shorten the transition between current and new business models (BMs) and avoid losses in terms of revenue, image and customer retention, while acquiring experience and validated learning in the process. The purpose of this paper is to propose a lean framework to support digital new ventures in the BMC process.

Design/methodology/approach

The study builds its contribution on two pillars: a review on BM and the lean thinking theories, and a multiple case study on three digital new ventures which underwent BMC.

Findings

The study shows how BMC in a digital context can beneficially follow lean principles, and how these principles can be integrated in an original lean framework to experiment on, validate and subsequently change a BM.

Originality/value

The authors provide the “single minute exchange of die” for BMC framework that extends and complements lean startup approaches to further relate lean thinking and BMC, thus operationalizing the process of BM experimenting and validation that enables change.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 25 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2018

Rafael Fazzi Bortolini, Marcelo Nogueira Cortimiglia, Angela de Moura Ferreira Danilevicz and Antonio Ghezzi

The primary goal of a startup is to find a viable business model that can generate value for its customers while being effectively captured by the startup itself. This…

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3833

Abstract

Purpose

The primary goal of a startup is to find a viable business model that can generate value for its customers while being effectively captured by the startup itself. This business model, however, is not easily defined, being a consequence of the application of tools involving trials, data analyses and testing. The Lean Startup (LS) methodology proposes a process for agile and iterative validation of business models. Given the popularity and importance of such methodology in professional circles, the purpose of this paper is to conduct a historical literature review of existing academic and professional literature, correlating LS concepts and activities to previous theory and alternative business model validation methods.

Design/methodology/approach

A historically oriented systematic literature review employing snowball sampling was conducted in order to identify academic and professional literature and references for iterative validation of business models. A total of 12 scholarly journals and professional magazines dealing with strategy, innovation, entrepreneurship, startups and management were used as data sources. The extensive literature review resulted in 963 exploratory readings and 118 papers fully analyzed.

Findings

The results position the LS as a practical-oriented and up-to-date implementation of strategies based on the Learning School of strategy making and the effectuation approach to entrepreneurship; the authors also identify a number of methods and tools that can complement the LS principles.

Originality/value

This paper identified and synthesized the scientific, academic and professional foundations that precede, support and complement the main concepts, processes and methods advocated by the LS methodology.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 59 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 26 July 2021

Fabiane Letícia Lizarelli, Alexandre Fonseca Torres, Jiju Antony, Renan Ribeiro, Willem Salentijn, Marcelo Machado Fernandes and Afonso Teberga Campos

The term Lean Startup (LS) was coined by Eric Ries, and his 2011 book has popularized the concept with organizations, both startups and established organizations…

Abstract

Purpose

The term Lean Startup (LS) was coined by Eric Ries, and his 2011 book has popularized the concept with organizations, both startups and established organizations, implementing LS. However the empirical grounding is thin and for a long time this subject has been neglected by academia. The purpose of this paper is to present a systematic literature review (SLR) on LS, while highlighting core knowledge and identify gaps.

Design/methodology/approach

A SLR was carried out based on the Preferred Reporting for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) protocol of Scopus and Web of Science databases. In total, 45 articles published in journals and conferences over 10 years were collected which revealed a number of LS research gaps.

Findings

The SLR revealed the tools and methods associated with LS, most cited pros and cons, reasons that cause LS failure, the challenges that companies face in the implementation of LS, and critical success factors (CSFs) that can support these challenges and minimize the reasons for failure.

Practical implications

The findings of the study can be beneficial to practitioners and senior managers in organizations who wish to delve into the journey of LS. The study also discloses challenges and barriers that can hinder the implementation of LS.

Originality/value

Academic publications regarding LS are sparse and this SLR is one of the first SLRs to explore both the critical failure factors (CFFs) and the CSFs based on peer-reviewed journal and conference proceedings.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

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Article
Publication date: 9 January 2020

Khurshid Ahmad, Zheng JianMing and Muhammad Rafi

This study aims to propose a model based on philosophical thoughts of Dr S.R Ranganathan and the lean-startup method for the execution of big data analytics (BDA) in…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to propose a model based on philosophical thoughts of Dr S.R Ranganathan and the lean-startup method for the execution of big data analytics (BDA) in libraries. The research paves a way to understand the role and required competencies of Library and Information Science (LIS) professionals for the implementation of BDA in libraries.

Design/methodology/approach

In the BDA analytics context, a session with a proposed model was presented to the audience to get the response of librarians about the required competencies and skills. The research tool was developed based on the literature review to know the role of LIS professionals and their required competencies/skills for BDA. The questionnaire was distributed in the BDA session to collect the responses of the participating audience on the variables that focused on the role and core competencies of LIS professionals in BDA. In the analysis of results, the independent t-test was applied to know the mean value of the overall response rate.

Findings

The findings show that perceptions of LIS professionals in the understanding of BDA ranked high in data privacy, data availability, data organization and data literacy. Digital data curation, policies supervision and providing the data consultancy also showed a significant relationship among these variables. Besides, the correlation between the required skills for BDA, metadata skills, data ethics, data acquisition, data cleaning, data organization, data analysis, digital curation, data clustering, data protection rules and digital visualization also showed a beneficial relationship.

Originality/value

This study also helps to understand the perspective of LIS professionals for the implementation of BDA in libraries and to fill the literature gap in the respective.

Details

Digital Library Perspectives, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5816

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Book part
Publication date: 27 September 2019

Edgar Muñiz-Avila, Geraldina Silveyra-Leon and Laura Alheli Segarra-Perez

It is well known that entrepreneurship is a complex phenomenon, which takes place under great uncertainty. Much of the existing research that explores the venture creation…

Abstract

It is well known that entrepreneurship is a complex phenomenon, which takes place under great uncertainty. Much of the existing research that explores the venture creation process has assumed a linear, unitary process. The proposal presented in this chapter involves the venture creation process viewed as an iterative, non-linear, feedback-driven system called the Startup Path – a framework that brings together the entrepreneur as an individual, with its journey on the venture creation process.

Details

Innovation and Entrepreneurship: A New Mindset for Emerging Markets
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-701-1

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Book part
Publication date: 12 January 2021

Hanieh Khodaei, Victor Scholten, Emiel Wubben and Onno Omta

Recent studies have questioned the direct relationship between entrepreneurial orientation (EO) and firm performance (e.g., Rauch, Wiklund, Lumpkin, & Frese, 2009; Wales

Abstract

Recent studies have questioned the direct relationship between entrepreneurial orientation (EO) and firm performance (e.g., Rauch, Wiklund, Lumpkin, & Frese, 2009; Wales, Gupta, & Mousa, 2013). Following this stream of research, this study examines this relationship by identifying the intermediate steps between these two variables (Alegre & Chiva, 2013; Wales, 2016; Zahra, Sapienza, & Davidsson, 2006). EO is considered essential for new market entry and new business foundation, which is why this study focuses on startups. Startups search for viable business opportunities, and this search is highly dependent on organizational learning (Kreiser, 2011). Previous studies suggest that organizational learning mediates the relationship between EO and performance (e.g., Real, Roldan, & Leal, 2014; Wang, 2008). This study investigates the role of organizational learning in this relationship by analyzing how EO and absorptive capacity (AC) interact. We propose a more direct and fine-grained measure of entrepreneurial success by developing a conceptual model that includes opportunity identification as an early outcome measure for startups. Drawing on a sample of 95 academic spin-offs in the Netherlands, this study examines the mediating role of AC and market readiness in the relationship between EO and market opportunities. The findings indicate that AC and market readiness mediate the direct effect of EO on market opportunity identification. By using opportunity identification as an outcome measure for EO, this study adopts a more direct measure for firm performance, resonating with recent discussions on the main effect of EO for organizations. These findings suggest that academic spin-offs’ AC leads entrepreneurial efforts to achieve a better product-market fit, and in return, helps to identify more market opportunities.

Details

Entrepreneurial Orientation: Epistemological, Theoretical, and Empirical Perspectives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-572-1

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