Search results

1 – 10 of over 128000
Article
Publication date: 1 December 1995

Valerie Lewington and Jane Farmer

Describes briefly the results of research carried out to look atthe provision of health information for consumers on the Channel Islandof Guernsey. The research utilized a…

2983

Abstract

Describes briefly the results of research carried out to look at the provision of health information for consumers on the Channel Island of Guernsey. The research utilized a three‐pronged survey to examine the views of the general public, recent hospital in‐patients and health professionals. These groups were asked to provide their views on the information currently available to them, the sources used and their degree of satisfaction with what was currently available. Respondents were also asked what could be done to improve health information provision on the island. Parallel to this, an independent audit of information sources on the island was carried out. Results establish a baseline on which plans for developing an island‐wide policy can be built. They show that there is a dearth of good information available. Consumers ask for more to be provided by health professionals and provide a number of ideas which can be used by policy makers to develop services. Concludes that current opinion would seem to be that policy makers are using the results to take some encouraging action.

Details

New Library World, vol. 96 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 October 2009

Christine Wamunyima Kanyengo

The paper highlights the need for grounding library and information policies within the environment they operate. The purpose of this paper is to argue for the grounding…

434

Abstract

Purpose

The paper highlights the need for grounding library and information policies within the environment they operate. The purpose of this paper is to argue for the grounding of health library and information policies within the health sector context.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is an opinion piece which discusses the importance of grounding library and information policies in the national health sector strategic plans.

Findings

A comprehensive and structural approach to improving access to health information as part of the overall priorities in the health sector requires concrete policies, strategies and services to be put in place at all levels of the national health system.

Practical implications

The paper offers insights into how to influence the formulation and eventual implementation of a national policy for library and information services in the health sector.

Originality/value

It describes the areas in which library and information policies can be used to fulfill the critical roles of supporting the mission of health‐care delivery in the country.

Details

Library Review, vol. 58 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1996

Bob Gann

This paper argues that while there have been significant advances in the development of consumer health information services over the past decade, there is no room for…

Abstract

This paper argues that while there have been significant advances in the development of consumer health information services over the past decade, there is no room for complacency as we approach the new millennium. If we are to avoid the dangers of complacency, passivity and superficiality we need to develop new skills. The future consumer health information professional will need to be skilled in creating information products, interpreting information needs and reviewing and synthesizing information to support decision making.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 48 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1986

Sue Lacey Bryant

More library and information workers are likely to develop their careers ‘beyond the fringe’ of conventional librarianship. The post of Health Education/Information

Abstract

More library and information workers are likely to develop their careers ‘beyond the fringe’ of conventional librarianship. The post of Health Education/Information Officer (HE/IO) within Croydon Health Education Department demonstrates the potential to do so. The HE/IO acts as an information broker. Four main areas of activity are identified: (1) developing the library and information service; (2) meeting the information needs of colleagues; (3) promoting a healthy life‐style; (4) promoting the Health Education Department's services. The library has been reorganised. It is becoming a focus for other organisations seeking advice on handling information. The relevance of online searching is being tested. The creation of the post has enabled colleagues to concentrate on assessment, not retrieval, and has expanded the information dimension of the Department's work. The broker, like other Health Education Officers, undertakes research, liaison, planning, organisation, publicity and teaching. Library displays, reference packs of leaflets and information packs are used to promote health through libraries. Successful information brokerage requires wholehearted commitment to full participation in the work of a team, willingness to adapt and acquire new skills, and flexibility. Librarians and information workers could assume several different roles within Health Education Units.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

S.O. Popoola

Discusses the information needs and services of health consumers in Nigeria. The cluster‐quota sampling technique with a questionnaire instrument was used for data…

1065

Abstract

Discusses the information needs and services of health consumers in Nigeria. The cluster‐quota sampling technique with a questionnaire instrument was used for data collection on 260 subjects out of which 250 responded and their questionnaires were found to be usable for analysis. The study found that there was a significant relationship between the levels of education of the health consumers and sources of information used. Books/reports, medical laboratories, film houses and medical library/records office were rarely used when they were searching for pertinent information on health care services. Also, their specific areas of health information needs and services were found to be health institutions service quality, child and maternal care, drugs administration, and family planning. The available health information systems failed to meet the demands made of them.

Details

Library Review, vol. 49 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1997

Sophia Kaane

The achievement of a primary health care approach calls for professional partnership. Both government and non‐governmental organizations have repackaged information into…

1230

Abstract

The achievement of a primary health care approach calls for professional partnership. Both government and non‐governmental organizations have repackaged information into various formats which are used to transfer health information to the rural communities in the developing world. Highlights some of the formats. Makes suggestions as to how libraries could also contribute to health information transfer to the rural population.

Details

Library Review, vol. 46 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

Harvey R. Brenneise and Ellen B. Marks

Describes the AccessMichigan Electronic Community Health Information Initiative (AMECHII) which aims to provide state‐wide access to high‐quality, timely, reliable and…

389

Abstract

Describes the AccessMichigan Electronic Community Health Information Initiative (AMECHII) which aims to provide state‐wide access to high‐quality, timely, reliable and valid health information for consumers and practitioners, regardless of geographical location or economic status. A formal exploration phase has been completed which was notable for the involvement of experts from every type of library in the state and a variety of health‐care organisations. The next phase will be a strategic planning process, outlined to ultimately result in methods for economic sustainability and a new paradigm for multi‐type library and health‐care stakeholder collaboration for the acquisition, distribution and use of electronic health information over a wide geographical and culturally diverse area.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 October 2022

Carolyn Caffrey, Hannah Lee, Tessa Withorn, Maggie Clarke, Amalia Castañeda, Kendra Macomber, Kimberly M. Jackson, Jillian Eslami, Aric Haas, Thomas Philo, Elizabeth Galoozis, Wendolyn Vermeer, Anthony Andora and Katie Paris Kohn

This paper presents recently published resources on library instruction and information literacy. It provides an introductory overview and a selected annotated…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper presents recently published resources on library instruction and information literacy. It provides an introductory overview and a selected annotated bibliography of publications covering various library types, study populations and research contexts. The selected bibliography is useful to efficiently keep up with trends in library instruction for busy practitioners, library science students and those wishing to learn about information literacy in other contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

This article annotates 424 English-language periodical articles, monographs, dissertations, theses and reports on library instruction and information literacy published in 2021. The sources were selected from the EBSCO platform for Library, Information Science, and Technology Abstracts (LISTA), Education Resources Information Center (ERIC), Scopus, ProQuest Dissertations and Theses, and WorldCat, published in 2021 that included the terms “information literacy,” “library instruction,” or “information fluency” in the title, abstract or keywords. The sources were organized in Zotero. Annotations summarize the source, focusing on the findings or implications. Each source was categorized into one of seven pre-determined categories: K-12 Education, Children and Adolescents; Academic and Professional Programs; Everyday Life, Community, and the Workplace; Libraries and Health Information Literacy; Multiple Library Types; and Other Information Literacy Research and Theory.

Findings

The paper provides a brief description of 424 sources and highlights sources that contain unique or significant scholarly contributions.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians, researchers and anyone interested as a quick and comprehensive reference to literature on library instruction and information literacy within 2021.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 50 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 12 June 2015

Carla Teixeira Lopes and Cristina Ribeiro

Prior studies have shown that terminology support can improve health information retrieval but have not taken into account the characteristics of the user performing the…

Abstract

Prior studies have shown that terminology support can improve health information retrieval but have not taken into account the characteristics of the user performing the search. In this chapter, the impact of translating queries’ terms between lay and medico-scientific terminology, in users with different levels of health literacy and topic familiarity, is evaluated. Findings demonstrate that medico-scientific queries demand more from the users and are mostly aimed at health professionals. In addition, these queries retrieve documents that are less readable and less well understood by users. Despite this, medico-scientific queries are associated with higher precision in the top-10 retrieved documents results and tend slightly to generate knowledge with less incorrect contents, the researchers concluded that search engines should provide query suggestions with medico-scientific terminology, whenever the user is able to digest it, that is, in users above the lowest levels of health literacy and topic familiarity. On the other hand, retrieval systems should provide lay alternative queries in users with inadequate health literacy or in those unfamiliar with a topic. In fact, the quantity of incorrect contents in the knowledge that emerges from a medico-scientific session tends to decrease with topic familiarity and health literacy. In terms of topic familiarity, the opposite happens with Graded Average Precision. Moreover, users most familiar with a topic tend to have higher motivational relevance with medico-scientific queries than with lay queries. This work is the first to consider user context features while studying the impact of a query processing technique in several aspects of the retrieval process, including the medical accuracy of the acquired knowledge.

Details

Current Issues in Libraries, Information Science and Related Fields
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-637-9

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 6 August 2018

Erin Klawitter and Eszter Hargittai

Purpose: Many Internet users search for health information but they struggle with assessing the quality of the information they find. By drawing on a multi-modal approach

Abstract

Purpose: Many Internet users search for health information but they struggle with assessing the quality of the information they find. By drawing on a multi-modal approach to data collection, this study aims to understand further the nuanced cognitive processes that people utilize as they acquire and evaluate online health information.

Design: We used a mixed-methods approach that includes surveys, interviews, and observations of 76 diverse adults of all ages in the Chicago area completing various health information-seeking tasks.

Findings: Most participants begin their information-seeking process on search engines. We identified the most popular credibility-assessment strategies used on the search engine results’ pages (SERP) as well as on websites. We also explored how the process of executing such strategies reveals greater and lesser savvy among users.

Research Limitations: While the sample size and methods limit its generalizability, this study included a larger and more diverse group of participants than most observational work, which results in data about a wider range of behaviors than is typical of such research.

Social Implications: Our findings showed that most of our participants could use additional education regarding credibility assessment of online health information. Additionally, since a great deal of credibility assessment occurs on SERP, search companies bear a particular responsibility for ensuring the quality of the information their results highlight.

Details

eHealth: Current Evidence, Promises, Perils and Future Directions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-322-5

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 128000