Search results

1 – 10 of over 44000
Article
Publication date: 28 August 2009

Lusine H. Aramyan and Marijke Kuiper

The purpose of this study is to present a conceptual overview of the price transmissions within agri‐food supply chains. Analyzing price transmission in agri‐food supply

1974

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to present a conceptual overview of the price transmissions within agri‐food supply chains. Analyzing price transmission in agri‐food supply chains is essential since imperfect price transition may result in market power. This is an important issue that needs attention, given that the structure of agri‐food retail in Europe, USA and Canada is experiencing rapid change towards retail power.

Design/methodology/approach

The conceptual overview draws on a review of different approaches in analyzing transmission of prices through an agri‐food supply chain based on supply chain analysis and price transmission studies.

Findings

Three key challenges are identified in analyzing price transmission in agri‐food supply chains: structure of the supply chain; factors affecting price transmission; and supply response.

Originality/value

This paper presents a novel concept in analyzing price transmission in agri‐food supply chains using price transmission literature and bi‐directional flows of information and products in agri‐food supply chains

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 August 2022

Qingxin Xie, Fujin Yi and Xu Tian

This paper aims to investigate the changes in living standard among families with different socio-economic status in China with the use of Engel's Coefficient. The authors…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the changes in living standard among families with different socio-economic status in China with the use of Engel's Coefficient. The authors develop a decomposition methodology to figure out the driving forces behind changes in Engel's Coefficient, and investigate how dramatic economic growth, volatile food price and rapid nutrition transition affect living standard among different families.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors propose a statistical method to decompose the changes in living standard measured by Engel's Coefficient into structure effect, price effect, quantity effect and income effect. Using the China Health and Nutrition Survey data between 2000 and 2011, the authors estimate these four effects by employing a decomposition method.

Findings

Results show that Engel's Coefficient in China decreased by 8.7 percentage points (hereafter “pp”) during 2000–2011, where structure effect leads to 0.2 pp increase, price effect results in 17.7 pp increase, quantity effect brings about 12.4 pp decline and income effect contributes to 14.2 pp decline. Results indicate that rising food prices are the main obstacle to improve households' living standard. Typically, poor and rural families' living standard is more vulnerable to the rise in food prices, and they benefit less from income growth.

Originality/value

This study proposes a decomposition method to investigate the determinants of change in Engel's Coefficient, which provides a deeper understanding of how economic growth, food price change and nutrition transition affect people's living standard in different socio-economic groups in developing countries. This study also provides valuable insights on how to achieve common prosperity from the perspective of consumption upgrading.

Details

China Agricultural Economic Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-137X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 15 July 2017

Donald Mitchell, Aneth Kayombo and Nancy Cochrane

The purpose of this chapter is to examine the impact of the global food crisis of 2007–2008 on Tanzania’s real retail-food prices and on the cost of the typical food

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to examine the impact of the global food crisis of 2007–2008 on Tanzania’s real retail-food prices and on the cost of the typical food basket. The methodological approach is to compare real retail-food prices and food-basket costs in 20 regions of Tanzania with global food prices. The findings are that the global food crisis of 2007–2008 did not significantly cause food prices in Tanzania to increase and that domestic factors were more important drivers of food prices and food-basket costs. The social implication is that the impacts of the global food crisis on food prices and food-basket costs in developing countries may have been overestimated in previous research and the policy responses of the global community may have been inappropriate.

Details

World Agricultural Resources and Food Security
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-515-3

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 6 October 2017

Lance Brennan, Les Heathcote and Anton Lucas

This paper attempts to understand how the interaction of natural disasters and human behaviour during wartime led to famines in three regions under imperial control around…

Abstract

This paper attempts to understand how the interaction of natural disasters and human behaviour during wartime led to famines in three regions under imperial control around the Indian Ocean. The socio-economic structure of these regions had been increasingly differentiated over the period of imperial rule, with large proportions of their populations relying on agricultural labour for their subsistence.

Before the war, food crises in each of the regions had been met by the private importation of grain from national or overseas surplus regions: the grain had been made available through a range of systems, the most complex of which was the Bengal Famine Code in which the able-bodied had to work before receiving money to buy food in the market.

During the Second World War, the loss of control of normal sources of imported grain, the destruction of shipping in the Indian Ocean (by both sides) and the military demands on internal transport systems prevented the use of traditional famine responses when natural events affected grain supply in each of the regions. These circumstances drew the governments into attempts to control their own grain markets.

The food crises raised complex ethical and practical issues for the governments charged with their solution. The most significant of these was that the British Government could have attempted to ship wheat to Bengal but, having lost naval control of the Indian Ocean in 1942 and needing warships in the Atlantic and Mediterranean in 1943 chose to ignore the needs of the people of Bengal, focussing instead on winning the war.

In each of the regions governments allowed/encouraged the balkanisation of the grain supply – at times down to the sub-district level – which at times served to produce waste and corruption, and opened the way for black markets as various groups (inside and outside government ranks) manipulated the local supply.

People were affected in different ways by the changes brought about by the war: some benefitted if their role was important to the war-effort; others suffered. The effect of this was multiplied by the way each government ‘solved’ its financial problems by – in essence – printing money.

Because of the natural events of the period, there would have been food crises in these regions without World War II, but decisions made in the light of wartime exigencies and opportunities turned crises into famines, causing the loss of millions of lives.

Article
Publication date: 27 May 2022

Xuecheng Fan, Xinxin Wang, Zeshui Xu and Marinko Skare

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the food price inflation convergence across countries and regions. This study aims to identify the key drivers for food price

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the food price inflation convergence across countries and regions. This study aims to identify the key drivers for food price inflation across countries and regions.

Design/methodology/approach

We test whether the international food price inflations are converging over time using the log t convergence test and clustering analysis. These inflation data are collected from the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.

Findings

The test results suggest that there is little evidence of overall convergence. Then we utilize a clustering algorithm and the results support that there is strong evidence of multiple convergence clubs. In addition, we examine the transition path of the various convergence and find that social stability regulation together with economic conditions are important determinants of convergence club membership.

Research limitations/implications

First off, local conflict and economic environment result in food supply and prices, but this study is limited to the dynamics of prices.

Practical implications

Food prices inflations are not converging to single common price inflation, but there exist subgroups of countries or regions within which food price inflation tends to converge. These groupings tend to be related to the economic development and social stability of countries and regions.

Social implications

The authors believe that any analysis of food price inflations that does not consider the political environment and economic conditions dynamics will likely be omitting important components of food price dynamics.

Originality/value

This study uses a unique data set covering 198 countries and regions and provides a comprehensive analysis of international food price inflation convergence identifying the key drivers of convergence club membership.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 10 August 2021

Krystian Jaworski

The purpose of this study paper is to focus on developing novel ways to monitor an economy in real time during the COVID-19 pandemic. A fully automated framework is…

2728

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study paper is to focus on developing novel ways to monitor an economy in real time during the COVID-19 pandemic. A fully automated framework is proposed for collecting and analyzing online food prices in Poland. This is important, as the COVID-19 outbreak in Europe in 2020 has led many governments to impose lockdowns that have prevented manual price data collection from food outlets. The study primarily addresses whether food price inflation can be accurately measured during the pandemic using only a laptop and Internet connection, without needing to rely on official statistics.

Design/methodology/approach

The big data approach was adopted to track food price inflation in Poland. Using the web-scraping technique, daily price information about individual food and non-alcoholic beverage products sold in online stores was gathered.

Findings

Based on raw online data, reliable estimates of monthly and annual food inflation were provided about 30 days before final official indexes were published.

Originality/value

This is the first paper to focus on measuring inflation in real time during the COVID-19 pandemic. Monthly and annual food price inflation are estimated in real time and updated daily, thereby improving previous forecasting solutions with weekly or monthly indicators. Using daily frequency price data deepens understanding of price developments and enables more timely detection of inflation trends, both of which are useful for policymakers and market participants. This study also provides a review of crucial issues regarding inflation that emerged during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 13
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 September 2021

Michael Scholz and Roman-David Kulko

The purpose of this paper is to (1) investigate the effect of freshness on consumers' willingness to pay, (2) derive static and dynamic pricing strategies and (3) compare…

323

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to (1) investigate the effect of freshness on consumers' willingness to pay, (2) derive static and dynamic pricing strategies and (3) compare the effect of these pricing strategies on a retailer's revenue and food waste. This investigation helps to reveal the potentials of dynamic pricing strategies for building more sustainable business models.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conduct an online experiment to measure consumers' willingness to pay for fresh and three-days’ old strawberries. The impact of freshness on willingness to pay is analysed using univariate tests and regression analysis. Pricing strategies are compared using a Monte Carlo simulation.

Findings

The results of this study show that freshness largely determines consumers' willingness to pay and price sensitivity. This renders dynamic pricing a promising strategy from an economic point of view. The results of the simulation study show that food waste can be reduced by up to 53.6% with a dynamic pricing instead of a static pricing strategy in the case that there are as many consumers as strawberry packages in the inventory. Revenue can be increased by up to 10% compared to a static pricing strategy based on fresh strawberries.

Practical implications

This study suggests that food retailers can improve their revenue when switching from static to dynamic pricing. Furthermore, in most cases, food retailers can reduce food waste with a dynamic instead of a static-pricing strategy, which might help to improve their image through a more sustainable business model and attract additional consumers.

Originality/value

This study is the first to analyse the possibility of using food freshness to design a dynamic pricing strategy and to analyse the impact of such a pricing strategy on both, a retailer's revenue and a retailer's food waste.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 124 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 September 2015

Xiaohuan Wang, Zhi-Ping Fan, Yiming Wang and Manning Li

The purpose of this paper is to put forward a multi-period dynamic pricing strategy for perishable food considering consumers’ price fairness perception. The impacts of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to put forward a multi-period dynamic pricing strategy for perishable food considering consumers’ price fairness perception. The impacts of the multi-period retail price, food freshness and inventory shortage risk on consumers’ heterogeneous willingness to pay (WTP) and their strategic purchasing behaviours are studied.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors present a price optimization model for perishable food, and conduct a laboratory experiment to justify the theoretical model. The data collected are analysed by correlation analysis and nonparametric test.

Findings

The results obtained reveal, first, food freshness and inventory shortage risk have effect on consumers’ heterogeneous WTP. Second, different retail prices lead to consumers’ strategically purchasing behaviours. Finally, consumers’ intertemporal price fairness perception and the food retailer’s long-term utility maximization can be achieved by developing multi-period dynamic pricing strategy.

Practical implications

This study suggests the perishable food retailer to apply a step-by-step price markdown strategy. It aims at eliminating price unfairness perceptions caused by loss of freshness and high shortage risk of the perishable food in the subsequent selling periods within the shelf life. Some valuable managerial insights towards perishable pricing for food retailers are discussed.

Originality/value

This study serves as the first step to utilize a laboratory experiment to dig out consumers’ intertemporal WTP towards perishable food. It also presents a novel way for describing consumers’ intertemporal price fairness perception by equalizing consumers’ average utilities considering consumer surplus, food freshness and shortage risk at different selling periods. The line of research on dynamic pricing concerning consumers’ price fairness perception is quite new in academic research, and has arisen due to its importance for food retailers of maximizing their long-term revenues and also of constructing mutual benefit and lasting connections with the consumers.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 117 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 July 2011

Abiodun Elijah Obayelu

The purpose of this study is to create an opportunity to see what is wrong with agriculture and provide an opportunity for much needed change. It identified who benefits…

2223

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to create an opportunity to see what is wrong with agriculture and provide an opportunity for much needed change. It identified who benefits or bears the pains of food prices increase, examines the causes and effects of the increase and discusses policy responses by various countries and the implications of such interventions.

Design/methodology/approach

Secondary data were employed and analyzed through simple descriptive statistics.

Findings

The results of the findings showed that increase in food prices affects the nutrition of not only the poor but also the working and middle classes. It limits the food consumption of the poor and worsens the dietary quality. It revealed that foods are available in many countries but millions of people have no purchasing power. Some of the driving forces of price increase include expansion of biofuels, high demand for food, and high cost of food production, climate change, unfavorable government policy and underinvestment in agricultural innovation. Contrary to the opinion that increased food prices benefit farmers, this study observed that the marketers benefit most. High costs of inputs and inflation make it difficult or impossible to produce by smallholder farmers.

Originality/value

The recent increase in food prices around the world has raised serious concerns about food and nutrition security of people. As part of intervention, several countries have banned grain exports and tariff reductions on imported foods in others. The export restrictions and import subsidies have harmful effects on import‐dependent trading partners and give wrong incentives to farmers by reducing their potential market size. The price controls employed by some countries reduce farmers' incentives to produce more food.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 25 June 2020

Xiaohua Yu, Chang Liu, Hanjie Wang and Jan-Henning Feil

The purpose of this paper is to empirically study the impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) on food prices in China and provides policy implications for crisis…

3122

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically study the impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) on food prices in China and provides policy implications for crisis management for other countries who are still under the crisis of COVID-19 and for the future in China and beyond as well.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper first designed a theoretical model of market equilibrium, which shows that the impact of COVID-19 on food prices is linked to the impact difference on demand and supply in response to the COVID-19 crisis. Then we collected the representative prices data for four major food products (rice, wheat flour, pork and Chinese cabbages) from three provinces (Shandong as a producing base, Beijing as a consumption base and Hubei as the epicenter), and set up an iGARCH model.

Findings

(1) No significant impact on rice and wheat flour prices, (2) significantly positive impact on cabbages prices and (3) various impact on pork prices. Note that the outbreak and the severity of COVID-19 have different impacts. The outbreak itself may have a relatively large impact on pork and cabbage prices, which may result from social panic, while the magnitude of the impact of severity is relatively small, and some are negative, perhaps due to more reduced demand during the quarantine.

Practical implications

China always puts food security in its prior position of policy agenda and has been preparing for the worst scenario of the food security crisis. In the anti-COVID-19 campaign, China's local governments developed many measures to ensure food provision for each consumer. Hence, the impact of COVID-19 on food prices is minor. However, the outbreak of COVID-19 crisis could cause social panic in some scenarios where consumers may hoard food. Eventually, it may form a vicious cycle to push up food prices. This will be a challenging policy issue in crisis management for almost all governments.

Originality/value

This paper provides empirical evidence on the impact of COVID-19 on food prices in China. China has basically contained the COVID-19 in the whole country, and no major food crisis occurred during this process. The results will provide information on crisis management for other countries that are still under the COVID-19 crisis, and for future China and beyond.

Details

China Agricultural Economic Review, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-137X

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 44000