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Article
Publication date: 12 July 2013

Minatsu Kobayashi, Motoki Iwasaki and Shoichiro Tsugane

Developed countries have devised guidelines for various eating habits, many of which simply recommend “eating various foods” without specifying how much food the…

Abstract

Purpose

Developed countries have devised guidelines for various eating habits, many of which simply recommend “eating various foods” without specifying how much food the individual should consume each day. The authors aimed to examine the relationship between the variety of food consumed and the probability of nutritional adequacy in middle‐aged Japanese.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 215 subjects (102 men and 113 women) provided complete dietary records for seven days in each of the winter, spring, summer and autumn. Subjects were categorized into groups of five according to the amount of each food eaten per day, calculated energy, and nutrients in the food. Results were compared with respective indicators of nutrition defined by the Dietary Reference Intakes for Japanese (2010).

Findings

The percentage of overweight subjects was higher in the group that did not consume a wide variety of foods. Intake of energy, calcium, zinc, magnesium, vitamins B1, B2 and C were insufficient in the subjects who did not consume a wide variety of foods. Although a trend toward sufficient nutrient intake was observed in the group that consumed a variety of foods, the estimated average requirement for several nutrients such as calcium and zinc was below accepted standards for good nutrition.

Originality/value

The variety of foods eaten is related to the adequacy of intake levels of certain nutrients and to body mass index in middle‐aged Japanese subjects. Eating a wide variety of foods is important to ensuring adequate nutrient intake.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 43 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 27 April 2020

Yang Gao, Zhihao Zheng and Shida R. Henneberry

This study estimates the income elasticities of calorie, macronutrients (carbohydrate, protein and fat) and key micronutrients including cholesterol, vitamin A, vitamin C…

Abstract

Purpose

This study estimates the income elasticities of calorie, macronutrients (carbohydrate, protein and fat) and key micronutrients including cholesterol, vitamin A, vitamin C, sodium, potassium, calcium, iron, zinc and insoluble fiber separately for urban and rural adults aged 18–60, using China Health and Nutrition Survey data set from 2004 to 2011.

Design/methodology/approach

A semiparametric model, a two-way fixed-effects model and a quantile regression approach are employed to estimate nutrient–income elasticities.

Findings

The income elasticities of calorie, protein, fat, cholesterol and calcium are in the range of 0.059–0.076, 0.059–0.076, 0.090–0.112, 0.134–0.230, 0.183–0.344 and 0.058–0.105, respectively. The income elasticity of each of the other nutrients is less than 0.1. The income elasticities of calorie and the majority of nutrients included are larger for rural residents than for urban residents and for low-income groups than for medium- and high-income groups. Overall, in spite of having a relatively small impact, income growth is shown to still have an impact on improving the nutritional status of Chinese adults.

Originality/value

This study estimates nutrient–income elasticities separately for urban and rural adults, expanding the scope of the study regarding the impact of income on the nutritional status in China. Moreover, this study uses a pooled sample generated from the personal food consumption records covering foods consumed at home and away from home during 2004–2011, which is thus likely to more comprehensively reveal the causal relationship between income growth and changes in the nutritional status in China.

Details

China Agricultural Economic Review, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-137X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1980

John R. Kemm

Many committees have produced tables of recommended dietary intakes. All are careful to stress that their recommendations are amounts sufficient, or more than sufficient…

Abstract

Many committees have produced tables of recommended dietary intakes. All are careful to stress that their recommendations are amounts sufficient, or more than sufficient, for the nutritional needs of practically all healthy persons in the population but are not a precise statement of nutrient requirements. The recommendations may ‘serve as guides for government officials and others whose duty it is to plan agricultural production and to control imports and exports of food in order to ensure that the food supply will be sufficient to meet the needs of the people’ and ‘may be used as a guide for caterers and dietitians when planning diets for groups of healthy individuals’

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 80 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

David Godfrey and David Richardson

Although it is possible to achieve a balanced diet by eating a variety of foods, it is clear that there is a gap between the ideal and the reality of what people actually…

Abstract

Although it is possible to achieve a balanced diet by eating a variety of foods, it is clear that there is a gap between the ideal and the reality of what people actually eat. For individuals at all stages of life and with changing lifestyles where food selections may compromise optimal nutrition, nutrient‐dense foods including fortified foods and food supplements can serve as an effective means of ensuring that micronutrient needs are fulfilled. Populations at risk include the elderly, women at various life stages, children and adolescents, and people trying to lose weight. Efficacy and safety are key health issues: efficacy refers to the ability of vitamins and minerals either to prevent a deficiency, to enhance a physiological effect or to reduce the risk of disease; safety refers to the safe intake of a micronutrient to avoid adverse effects. Safety is the fundamental tenet of the scientific risk assessments and the cornerstone of food safety policy and legislation. Harmonisation of laws on food fortification and food supplements at EU level will help to ensure a high level of public health and consumer protection and facilitate the free circulation of food products within the community.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 104 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 5 May 2015

Li Zhou and Calum G. Turvey

– The purpose of this paper is to investigate the linkages between climate change, income dynamics and nutrition intake in rural China.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the linkages between climate change, income dynamics and nutrition intake in rural China.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a system of simultaneous equations in a three-stage least squares model instrumented with carbohydrates, fats, proteins and farm income the authors found generally that the greatest impact on nutrition would be from changes in temperature.

Findings

The authors do not find that modest changes in precipitation affect nutrient intake, but extreme events such as drought do. Furthermore, the authors found a strong income effect and this income effect is opposite the heating effect. This may suggest that large swings in nutrient intake brought about by climate change may be countermanded by equivalent increases in income. The authors also found that in terms of general measures of elasticity that market effects, especially in the price of meats, can impact carbohydrate, fat and protein intake as much as global warming.

Originality/value

The authors believe that three aspects of this manuscript will make it interesting. First, in the short term, poorer households would be the most vulnerable and sensitive to climate change. However, in the long term, all households in rural China appear able to deal with changing climatic conditions through adaptation. Second, the authors do not find evidences to prove the existence of a poverty nutrition trap in rural China. Third, the results also indicate that, the nutrition intake of households in rural China is more prone to gradual changes, rather than extreme events.

Details

China Agricultural Economic Review, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-137X

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Article
Publication date: 29 June 2018

Amir Bagheri, Seyed Mostafa Nachvak, Hadi Abdollahzad, Peshawa Arzhang, Mansour Rezaei, Yahya Pasdar, Mahmoud Reza Moradi and Farzad Mohammadi

It has been suggested that there is a link between the dietary intake of certain nutrients and the risk of prostate cancer. The aim of this study is to examine the…

Abstract

Purpose

It has been suggested that there is a link between the dietary intake of certain nutrients and the risk of prostate cancer. The aim of this study is to examine the associations between dietary intakes of all nutrients and the risk of prostate cancer in Kermanshah.

Design/methodology/approach

This case-control study was conducted in Kermanshah, a province in the west of Iran in November of 2016. The sample consisted of 50 patients with confirmed prostate cancer, and 150 healthy men who matched in age with these cases and did not have any symptoms of prostate disorder were chosen as controls. Dietary intakes were collected by a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire that contained 147 food items and were then analyzed by Nutritionist 4 software.

Findings

After adjustment for potential confounding factor, highest tertile compared to lowest tertile of dietary vitamin E intake [odds ratio (OR) = 0.21; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.05-0.89], lycopene intake (OR = 0.11; 95% CI = 0.01-0.86) and magnesium intake (OR = 0.02; 95% CI = 0.01-0.55) had a protective effect on the incidence of prostate cancer. However, there were no associations between dietary intakes of fiber, vitamin A, vitamin D, vitamin B12, folate and calcium with prostate cancer.

Originality/value

The finding suggests that the dietary intakes of vitamin E, lycopene and magnesium could decrease the risk of prostate cancer. Nevertheless, dietary intake of other nutrients such as fiber, calcium, vitamins D, A, B12 and folate was not associated with prostate cancer.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 48 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Michael S. Donaldson

Reports the results of a survey of followers of the mostly raw, pure vegetarian, Hallelujah diet, which is promoted by the Hallelujah Acres Foundation in the USA…

Abstract

Reports the results of a survey of followers of the mostly raw, pure vegetarian, Hallelujah diet, which is promoted by the Hallelujah Acres Foundation in the USA. Seven‐day semi‐quantitative dietary records kept by 141 followers of the diet were collected and analyzed for nutrient intake. Claims self‐reported improvements in health and quality of life after adoption of the diet were significant (p < 1E‐07). Mean daily consumption of fruits and vegetables was 6.6 servings and 11.4 servings, respectively. Salads, fruits, carrot juice and grain products provided 60‐88 per cent of most nutrients. The mean energy intake was 1,460kcal/day for women and 1,830kcal/day for men. Claims that, with some modifications, this diet pattern allows people to adopt a low calorie diet sufficient in most nutrients.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Jacqueline Doumit and Ramzi Nasser

The purpose of this study was to assess nutrient intakes in elderly living in Lebanese nursing homes (NHs).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to assess nutrient intakes in elderly living in Lebanese nursing homes (NHs).

Design/methodology/approach

This cross-sectional study was conducted in 36 long-term care institutions from all over Lebanon. Out of 2,094 residents, 98 (69 women and 29 men) elderly met the inclusion criteria and successfully completed the interview question. Dietary food intake was assessed using the 24-h food recall. The analysis used a Chi-square test and independent samples t-test or Mann–Whitney test, as appropriate.

Findings

A high percentage of elderly (reaching 100 per cent) had a low intake of energy, protein, linolenic acid, linoleic acid, fibers, vitamins and minerals, and the prevalence of nutrient inadequacy was significantly different between sexes for copper intake (p = 0.02). The results of this study highlight the nutrient inadequacies among the majority of elderly living in long-term care institutions and particularly in women and elderly residing in NHs located away from the capital Beirut.

Originality/value

This study is quite original; this is the first study performed nationwide in Lebanon covering not only the largest number of NHs in various locations but also elderly under custodial settings and with diverse backgrounds.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 47 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2019

Norain Zainudin, Aliza Haslinda Hamirudin, Suriati Sidek and Nor Azlina A. Rahman

This study aims to investigate dietary intake among elderly living in agricultural settlements in comparison with a recent nutritional recommendation.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate dietary intake among elderly living in agricultural settlements in comparison with a recent nutritional recommendation.

Design/methodology/approach

This cross-sectional study was carried out among elderly living in five agricultural settlements in Kuantan, Pahang, Malaysia. Participants were interviewed on socio-demographic information such as age, gender, marital status, smoking status, household income, education level and living status. Data on individual dietary intake were obtained through diet history method. Dietary intake data were analyzed using Nutritionist Pro software and compared to the recommended nutrient intakes (RNI) for Malaysia version 2017. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS software version 21.

Findings

A total of 413 participants (male 32.4 per cent and female 67.6 per cent) with the mean age of 69.4 ± 7.9 years participated in this study. Dietary intake results demonstrated that participants did not meet the Malaysian RNI for energy and most nutrients (p < 0.05). This study also found that energy, carbohydrate, protein, fat, folate and iron intake were significantly higher in male than female (p < 0.05). Meanwhile, calcium and vitamin A intake were significantly higher in female than male (p < 0.05).

Research limitations/implications

Integrated nutrition education and health promotion programme with a multidisciplinary approach are essential to be designed and executed to improve dietary intake of the elderly, which can further lead to appropriate dietary practices and knowledge improvement related to healthy food choices. Factors associated with inadequate dietary intake and awareness on the importance of adequate nutrients intake among the elderly warrant further investigation.

Originality/value

This research is at the forefront, which indicated that the dietary intake of elderly individuals living in the agricultural settlement was inadequate in comparison to the latest recommendation. Strategies to improve their intakes need to be developed and implemented accordingly to improve nutritional status and prevent adverse effects to health.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 50 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2021

Pomi Shahbaz, Shamsheer ul Haq, Umer Bin Khalid and Ismet Boz

The COVID-19 pandemic has profound implications on the food and nutritional security of millions of households. The study assessed the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on…

Abstract

Purpose

The COVID-19 pandemic has profound implications on the food and nutritional security of millions of households. The study assessed the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on diet diversity, calorie consumption and intake of essential nutrients based on the gender of the households.

Design/methodology/approach

Mixed-design ANOVA and logistic regression were used to analyze the collected data from 260 female- and 463 male-headed households through an online survey in Pakistan.

Findings

The outcomes revealed that the diet diversity of female households was affected more due to the COVID-19 compared to male households. The decline in daily nutrients' (protein, phosphorus, zinc, iron and iodine) intake during the COVID-19 was also greater for female-headed households than male-headed households. The share of all food groups in daily calorie and nutrient provision decreased significantly during the COVID-19 for both types of households. The share of meat and meat products declined more for female-headed households compared to male-headed households. The share of perishable commodities in calorie provision to female and male households decreased 2% during the COVID-19 compared to the normal period. Small- and medium-sized female and male households were less likely to experience worsened diet diversity than large-sized households during the COVID-19. Low-income compared to medium- and high-income female and male households were more likely to report declined food diversity during the COVID-19.

Research limitations/implications

The data used in this study were collected through an online survey due to public health measures imposed in the country.

Originality/value

Despite the emergence of literature on the implications of the pandemic on food security, the studies related to the gender-based impacts of COVID-19 on diet diversity and nutritional intakes of necessary nutrients are still non-existent. The current study will add to the literature by filling this gap.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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