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Article
Publication date: 25 October 2022

Hatice Cifci, Gizem Kandemir Altunel, Oguz Taspinar and Ibrahim Cifci

The purpose of this study is to demystify the authenticity dimensions of wine experience with the locally guided tour in the meal-sharing economy, drawing on travellers'…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to demystify the authenticity dimensions of wine experience with the locally guided tour in the meal-sharing economy, drawing on travellers' online reviews at Withlocals for French locally guided wine tours.

Design/methodology/approach

The qualitative research approach was performed through the thematic analysis of 940 online reviews from Withlocals. The coding phase was completed based on a three-step coding process (i.e. open, axial and selective coding), as all reviews that were gathered were related to locally guided wine tours rather than only wine-sharing activities.

Findings

The findings of this study demonstrated four interrelated authenticity dimensions: the taste of terroir, local atmosphere, oenological knowledge and local insight. The results of this study also notably showed that all reviews were primarily positive; travellers expressed their satisfaction with wine tours at Withlocals and often mentioned their re-purchase intentions as well as advising wine tours in the meal-sharing economy.

Practical implications

Several worthy theoretical and practical implications were discussed for local tour guides to improve their tour quality more authentically. The results also demonstrate that locally guided wine tours in the meal-sharing economy were regarded as a multidimensional activity that provides a better discovery of a wine destination.

Originality/value

Despite the large volume of generic meal-sharing economy experience studies, the authenticity experience of the locally guided wine tours has been surprisingly omitted by scholars. Therefore, this study contributes to the sharing economy literature through wine experience by addressing the authenticity dimensions of the locally guided wine tours in the meal-sharing economy.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 September 2022

Noor Alyani Nor Azazi, Maslina Mohammed Shaed, Mohamad Shaharudin Samsurijan and Andrew Ebekozien

The development of higher learning institutions (HLIs) is considered a strategy to trigger urban space development – and it is the economy in most developing countries…

Abstract

Purpose

The development of higher learning institutions (HLIs) is considered a strategy to trigger urban space development – and it is the economy in most developing countries. HLIs can develop and maintain pace with the experience economy in the current urban economy, particularly in the services sector. This paper seeks to evaluate the influence of HLIs on elements of the experience economy in the urban services sector in Bandar Baru Bangi (BBB), a knowledge-based city.

Design/methodology/approach

The research adopted a purposive sampling technique and engaged 382 urban community respondents in BBB, Malaysia. The study used four elements (education, gastronomy, health, and the retail sectors) to assess the experience economy performance.

Findings

The results show that the local community is the “active users” of the services, and the active users have enjoyed the existence of the experience economy. Findings reveal a preference for education and health over gastronomy and retail sectors. Of these four sectors, the education sector experience had the most prominent effect, thereby showing that the higher learning institutions around this city served a major role in the sector development of urban services.

Research limitations/implications

The research used a purposive sampling method and engaged 382 respondents in BBB, Malaysia. The restriction of the study area to BBB is a limitation component. Future studies should explore a large-scale investigation to evaluate better and validate the results.

Practical implications

The research has shown that the city's higher education institutions have affected the development of the experience economy in the four sectors.

Originality/value

The study shows that the framework of the experience economy and the establishment of HLIs can stimulate the experience economy within the urban services sector.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Philosophy of Management and Sustainability: Rethinking Business Ethics and Social Responsibility in Sustainable Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-453-9

Book part
Publication date: 1 March 2021

Jenny Flinn

By the end of this chapter, you should be able to demonstrate an understanding of:The concept of experience and growth of the experience economy.The role of experiences in…

Abstract

By the end of this chapter, you should be able to demonstrate an understanding of:

The concept of experience and growth of the experience economy.

The role of experiences in engaging consumers and sustaining business.

The importance of experiential marketing as a tool for marketers.

Practical examples of how experiences can be used to market different products and services.

Details

New Perspectives on Critical Marketing and Consumer Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-554-2

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 July 2019

Ivan K.W. Lai, Dong Lu and Yide Liu

The concept of experience economy states that customers seek experiences whether from products and services. Tourism is at the forefront of the experience economy because…

Abstract

Purpose

The concept of experience economy states that customers seek experiences whether from products and services. Tourism is at the forefront of the experience economy because tourists are looking for staged experience encompassing the four realms (entertainment, educational, esthetic and escapism). The purpose of this paper is to empirically explore the effects of the experience economy on tourists’ word-of-mouth (WOM) in Chengdu cuisine through satisfaction and memory.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 397 valid data were collected from the tourists who have experienced the ethnic cuisine in Chengdu. A partial least-square structural equation modeling technique was used to examine the research model.

Findings

The empirical results indicated that esthetic is the antecedent of the other three realms of experience economy; esthetic, educational and entertainment experiences influence satisfaction; four realms of experience economy influence memory; and satisfaction and memory ultimately influence WOM.

Practical implications

The findings of this study provide practical implications for operators of ethnic restaurants in designing their restaurants and menus, travel agencies in planning the tour itinerary and governments in using ethnic cuisine for destination marketing.

Originality/value

This study is a pioneer in studying the experience economy in the ethnic cuisine. It has identified the relationships between four dimensions of experience economy of ethnic cuisine, tourist satisfaction, memory and WOM toward ethnic cuisine in a tourist destination. It has also integrated the senses of Chinese cuisine (“sight,” “smell” and “taste”) into the measures of esthetic experience for studying experience economy in ethnic cuisine.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 30 July 2018

Abstract

Details

Marketing Management in Turkey
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-558-0

Article
Publication date: 10 October 2018

Melissa-Vasiliki Alexiou

The purpose of this paper is to explore the influence of the experience economy and co-creation concepts on guided tours (GTs) and to analyze the process of the on-site…

3154

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the influence of the experience economy and co-creation concepts on guided tours (GTs) and to analyze the process of the on-site (co-)creation of experience between the service provider and the consumer taking into account the consumer perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

The objective of the study is fulfilled by reviewing the literature on experience economy and co-creation within a cultural heritage context and then using it to design appropriate research tools to collect empirical data through qualitative interviews within the context of a single case study. The Medieval Town of Rhodes (MTR), Greece, serves as the case in this study. In fact, this study analyzes primary data from 25 interviews with participants in GTs in the MTR.

Findings

The GT participant’s views of their GT experience were explored, and it was evaluated whether they fit any of the three generations of experience economy with an emphasis on co-creation of experience. The findings show that, in the MTR-GT services, the characteristics of mainly the first and second generation experience economies are found, while little emphasis is given to the third generation experience economy. Based on the empirical results, the RIF model (R: “Resources,” I: “Interactions,” F: “Feelings”) was created: this proposes that both the process of experience co-creation and optimal GT experiences are realized by providing participants with appropriate resources, multiple types of interactions and opportunities to generate positive and pleasant feelings. This model illustrates the intertwining, multi-dimensional facets of an optimal co-created GT experience that service providers and tour operators should provide to their customers.

Research limitations/implications

The present study has several limitations that need to be mentioned. First, this research is a single case study; the MTR serves as the case, focusing on one cultural heritage service, GTs. This fact can put the study’s validity in question. Moreover, as the research is conducted by a single person, there is the risk of subjective bias. Another limitation is that this study is not a longitudinal one; the latter could lead to more accurate findings. The number and the nationality of participants constitute the 4th and final limitation of the research. More specifically, the sample is not perceived to be representative of the population nor generalizable, while visitors from more nationalities could have been interviewed. In relation to this, the judgmental sampling method was used because the population of the study could not be defined. This serves as the fifth limitation of the study.

Practical implications

Tour operators and tour guides can exploit the characteristics of GT activities included in the proposed RIF model. By incorporating these elements in GT experiences, the process of experience co-creation could be effectively supported. An optimal GT experience that incorporates intertwining and multi-dimensional facets could be provided. To begin with, the physical setting where the tour takes place must be well preserved, so that it can capture the attention of the participants. The route of the tour should not be exhausting but convenient for all participants and should include various landscapes. On the other hand, tour guides should provide interesting, relevant and cohesive information. Moreover, a tour guide needs to display charismatic behavior to gain the tour group’s trust and generate positive feelings impressing and immersing participants in the experience and encouraging in them a sense of togetherness. Within the context of the tour, tangible elements such as brochures and maps should be provided, allowing vistors to tailor the experience according to their needs and preferences. Furthermore, interaction between the guide and the tour group, as well as among the participants themselves, should be encouraged. In relation to this, the tour group could be divided into sub-groups according to common features such as age. The guides could also come up with a topic to be jointly discussed and participatory activities such as games could be organized. Finally, participants should have some freedom during the tour; time to explore the setting on their own or a visit to specific places on request.

Originality/value

The originality of the paper lies in the development of the RIF model, illustrating the on-site optimal experience within the context of GTs taking place in the MTR, the setting of the research. The construction of the RIF model was based on an investigation into actual GT participant’s perspectives on GTs.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 November 2022

B. Joseph Pine II

Respecting customers’ time and innovating ways to add value to how they spend it is now a crucial measure of how well companies’ offering experiences fulfill their…

Abstract

Purpose

Respecting customers’ time and innovating ways to add value to how they spend it is now a crucial measure of how well companies’ offering experiences fulfill their purpose. Time is limited and attention is scarce, so enterprising companies will increasingly embrace experiences for demand generation.

Design/methodology/approach

To cope with the risks of Covid infection, many consumers shifted their experience menu from physical to digital, from social and communal to familial and individual. 10;But there are some differences that speak to the future of the Experience Economy. 10;

Findings

Instead of focusing on accumulating ever more material objects, the isolation forced by the pandemic has helped consumers to recognize that what gives their lives meaning is their shared experiences with family, loved ones, colleagues and friends.

Practical/implications

All businesses should be thinking creatively about innovating customer transformation opportunities -- for example, a new way for B2B companies to better accomplish their jobs-to-be-done.

Originality/Value

Experiential strategies and innovations that offer customers unique value have emerged in nearly every industry and business. A noted Experience Economy strategist looks at the future of such innovations. 10; 10

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Article
Publication date: 8 June 2018

Eran Ketter

The experience economy is characterized by the consumers’ search for emotions and memorable experiences through consumption. While the experience economy has a fundamental…

3030

Abstract

Purpose

The experience economy is characterized by the consumers’ search for emotions and memorable experiences through consumption. While the experience economy has a fundamental effect on tourists’ decision-making and their consumer behavior, only a limited number of past studies have examined the relations between the experience economy and destination marketing campaigns. To extend the scope of the existing knowledge, this paper aims to explore the use of experience marketing in destination marketing campaigns.

Design/methodology/approach

The study conducts a qualitative case study analysis of six national tourism marketing campaigns, i.e. it examines the use of experience marketing in tourism campaigns and the use of the strategic experiential module as an analysis framework for destination marketing campaigns.

Findings

The findings reveal an influence of experience marketing on the examined marketing campaigns as destinations highlight the motifs of memorable experiences, engaging people’s senses and creating meaning. In accordance with the strategic experiential module, the campaigns analyzed shift the marketing focal point from the characteristics of the destination to the tourists’ experiences of sensing, feeling, thinking, acting and relating.

Originality/value

The conclusions of the study contribute both to scholars and practitioners, extending the present knowledge of the link between experience marketing and tourism marketing, illustrating the effect of experience marketing on destination marketing and shedding new light on the role of the experience economy and experience marketing in tourism marketing campaigns.

Article
Publication date: 17 November 2022

Gökhan Akel and Engin Cakir

This research uses the experience economy theory and tourism experiences to explore how different types of experiences in theme parks influence visitors' experiential…

Abstract

Purpose

This research uses the experience economy theory and tourism experiences to explore how different types of experiences in theme parks influence visitors' experiential satisfaction and behavioral intention.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected from visitors of different nationalities at a theme park hotel. The R program and JASP were used to analyze the data of the multinational sampling. JASP was used for the structural equation modeling (SEM) and the R program for the analysis of the measurement invariance.

Findings

The results highlight the existence of different visitor behavior in the experience economy, tourism experience and experiential satisfaction among visitors of several nationalities. However, the results highlight the existence of common visitor behavior on behavioral intention among visitors of these nationalities. This study reveals that visitors of different nationalities can have both diverse experiential and cultural motivations.

Practical implications

The results show that managers should apply a plan and strategy according to the differences between the nationalities. By examining visitors from different nationalities, the study was allowed to be interpreted from a wider perspective in terms of academia and industry.

Originality/value

This study makes a difference in the literature in terms of focusing on cross-national differences by examining the experiences of visitors from different nationalities by using experience economy theory and tourism experience elements in the same research model.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 123000