Search results

1 – 10 of over 20000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Vanessa Gaffar, Benny Tjahjono, Taufik Abdullah and Vidi Sukmayadi

This paper aims to explore the influence of social media marketing on tourists’ intention to visit a botanical garden, which is one of the popular nature-based tourism…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the influence of social media marketing on tourists’ intention to visit a botanical garden, which is one of the popular nature-based tourism destinations in Indonesia.

Design/methodology/approach

This study sent questionnaires to 400 followers of the botanical garden’s Facebook account who responded to the initial calls for participation and declared that they have not visited the garden before. Analyses were conducted on 363 valid responses using the structural equation model.

Findings

The findings revealed several key determinants influencing the image of the botanical garden and its future value proposition, particularly in supporting the endeavour to shift from a mere recreational destination to a nature-based tourism destination offering educational experiences.

Originality/value

This paper offers a fresh look into the roles of social media marketing in increasing the intention to visit a tourism destination that is considerably affected by the destination image.

研究目的

本文探讨了社交媒体营销对游客参观植物园的意图的影响, 植物园是印度尼西亚最受欢迎的自然旅游胜地之一

研究设计/方法/途径

我们向植物园的Facebook帐户的400位关注者发送了调查表, 他们回应了我们最初的参与邀请, 并宣布他们以前从未访问过该花园。 使用结构方程模型(SEM)对363个有效响应进行了分析。

研究发现

调查结果揭示了影响植物园形象及其未来价值主张的几个关键因素, 特别是在支持从单纯的娱乐性目的地向提供教育经历的自然旅游目的地转变的努力中。

原创性/价值

本文重新审视了社交媒体营销在增加受目的地形象显着影响的旅游目的地的访问意向中的作用。

Me gusta, etiqueta y comparte: reforzar el marketing en redes sociales para mejorar la intención de visitar un destino turístico basado en la naturaleza

Objetivo

Este documento explora la influencia del marketing en las redes sociales en la intención de los turistas de visitar un jardín botánico, que es uno de los destinos turísticos más populares en Indonesia.

Diseño/metodología/enfoque

Enviamos cuestionarios a 400 seguidores de la cuenta de Facebook del jardín botánico que respondieron a nuestras llamadas iniciales de participación y declararon que no habían visitado el jardín antes. Los análisis se realizaron en 363 respuestas válidas utilizando el Modelo de Ecuación Estructural (MEE).

Resultados

Los hallazgos revelaron varios determinantes clave que influyen en la imagen del jardín botánico y su propuesta de valor futura, particularmente en el apoyo al esfuerzo de cambiar de un mero destino recreativo a un destino turístico basado en la naturaleza que ofrece experiencias educativas.

Originalidad/valor

Este documento ofrece una nueva mirada a las funciones del marketing en redes sociales para aumentar la intención de visitar un destino turístico que se ve considerablemente afectado por la imagen del destino.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Peter Keller

During the 48th AIEST Congress in Marrakech (Morocco) our organisation made an extensive study of destination marketing, its possibilities and its limitations. The many…

Abstract

During the 48th AIEST Congress in Marrakech (Morocco) our organisation made an extensive study of destination marketing, its possibilities and its limitations. The many members who attended were unanimous in the opinion that complementary and cooperative marketing need considerable development and stimulation at the destination level. As a result of global competition tourism organisations no longer find it possible to confine their activities to core tasks in market communication and public relations. In the context of positioning and branding policy they must increasingly make use of all the instruments of the marketing mix. Given the expectations of today's customers and the latest developments in the area of information technology it is no longer possible to separate activities in such fields as promotion, information, distribution and sales, if one wishes to remain effective. New concepts and organisational developments are therefore required that will make it possible to carry out destination marketing in a consistent manner. In this context, the marketing of destination‐like products such as leisure parks and resort corporations (consolidates) offers a rare opportunity for benchmarking. At the AIEST Congress we took note of the fact that, in cases where the supply is fragmented, there is no real alternative to vertical cooperation at the destination level. We discussed ways in which to bypass obstacles to cooperation. Government incentives play a major role in this context. Indeed without government support it will be just as difficult in the future as at present to carry out any kind of destination marketing.

Details

The Tourist Review, vol. 53 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0251-3102

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Mohamed E. Mohamed, Mahmoud Hewedi, Xinran Lehto and Magdy Maayouf

Given the increased importance of food in tourists’ travel experience, the purpose of this paper is to explore the current and future potential of local food and foodways…

Abstract

Purpose

Given the increased importance of food in tourists’ travel experience, the purpose of this paper is to explore the current and future potential of local food and foodways in marketing Egyptian destinations online.

Design/methodology/approach

The content of 20 Egyptian destination marketing organization (DMO) websites was subject to a content analysis. A checklist was developed based on literature analysis. The frequencies of information related to food culture and cuisine marketing were tallied, followed by a qualitative assessment of contents from the various websites. The results were further discussed with DMO representatives to provide contextualized insights as to the future potential of utilizing local food and food tourism initiatives as a component of DMOs website marketing in Egypt.

Findings

The study noted some initial efforts for Egyptian DMO websites to market food culture and gastronomic practices; however, the results suggest that the usage of food culture on Egyptian DMOs websites is still in its infancy. The study also highlights the challenges that need to be tackled as well as the resources required for food tourism development.

Practical implications

This study illustrates the need and potential capacity of Egyptian DMO websites to market food culture and local cuisines (including traditional foods and table manners). These results are expected to help Egyptian DMOs to strategically embrace local cuisine and food culture as a vehicle for destination marketing.

Originality/value

This case study provides insights for African and other developing economies in their destination marketing. The proposed framework and guidelines are intended to potentially serve as a framework for destination marketers and entrepreneurs to optimize the tourism potential of food culture.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Eran Ketter

The experience economy is characterized by the consumers’ search for emotions and memorable experiences through consumption. While the experience economy has a fundamental…

Abstract

Purpose

The experience economy is characterized by the consumers’ search for emotions and memorable experiences through consumption. While the experience economy has a fundamental effect on tourists’ decision-making and their consumer behavior, only a limited number of past studies have examined the relations between the experience economy and destination marketing campaigns. To extend the scope of the existing knowledge, this paper aims to explore the use of experience marketing in destination marketing campaigns.

Design/methodology/approach

The study conducts a qualitative case study analysis of six national tourism marketing campaigns, i.e. it examines the use of experience marketing in tourism campaigns and the use of the strategic experiential module as an analysis framework for destination marketing campaigns.

Findings

The findings reveal an influence of experience marketing on the examined marketing campaigns as destinations highlight the motifs of memorable experiences, engaging people’s senses and creating meaning. In accordance with the strategic experiential module, the campaigns analyzed shift the marketing focal point from the characteristics of the destination to the tourists’ experiences of sensing, feeling, thinking, acting and relating.

Originality/value

The conclusions of the study contribute both to scholars and practitioners, extending the present knowledge of the link between experience marketing and tourism marketing, illustrating the effect of experience marketing on destination marketing and shedding new light on the role of the experience economy and experience marketing in tourism marketing campaigns.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Karl Socher

The fast changes of the tourism markets make it necessary to adapt destination management organisations, their functions and financing. The paper tries to develop a model…

Abstract

The fast changes of the tourism markets make it necessary to adapt destination management organisations, their functions and financing. The paper tries to develop a model for an optimal, efficient destination management system, especially to cope with the problem of limiting the necessary government influence and transfer as many decisions as possible to the individual private entrepreneurs. In this model the two tasks of destination management organisations — product development and marketing — are separated and are financed by two different taxes or levies, which are necessary for the function of producing public goods on the one side and internalizing external effects on the other side. The distribution of the levy payments to the different purposes is left to a large extent to the free choice of the individual levy‐payer, the entreprises profiting from tourism. This will induce a competition process between different destination management organisations to find the most efficient system.

Details

The Tourist Review, vol. 55 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0251-3102

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

John Heeley

The purpose of this paper is to examine urban destination marketing from a mainly practitioner standpoint, though one of its principal observations is the gap between…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine urban destination marketing from a mainly practitioner standpoint, though one of its principal observations is the gap between theory and practice; while the former is premised on related notions of difference and competitive advantage, in practice the greater part of urban destination marketing eschews competitive advantage, resulting in a pervasive marketing of “sameness”.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is in three parts. The first set out the urban tourism context in respect of historical, market, supply, impact and definitional/measurement dimensions. Part two profiles the bespoke delivery mechanisms established for urban destination marketing, examining nomenclature, core purpose/mission, status, size and finances, as well as overhead and operating parameters.

Findings

The final section comprises a state-of-the-art review, setting out a five variable model of purposeful urban destination marketing, concluding that “good” in urban destination marketing is atypical and currently in Europe is confined to only a handful of European cities.

Originality/value

This paper is intended to give the reader a better understanding of why, in such an important field of human endeavour, success is so problematic. It hopefully gives pointers to practitioners and academics as to how best in future there can be more winners and fewer losers, so that increasing numbers of towns and cities maximise the impact locally of the world's largest industry and at the same time become “known”.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Erisher Woyo and Elmarie Slabbert

The success of tourism destinations is in many cases measured from a competitive advantage perspective, not from a collaborative advantage perspective, which limits the…

Abstract

Purpose

The success of tourism destinations is in many cases measured from a competitive advantage perspective, not from a collaborative advantage perspective, which limits the possibilities of destination marketing in a collaborative cross-border context. Currently, the marketing efforts of Victoria Falls are highly fragmented as each country promotes the attraction separately. The purpose of this paper is to explore the cross-border destination marketing possibilities and realities of Victoria Falls from a demand and supply side perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative approach was applied in this study, with two separate surveys being conducted. Data for the demand side were collected by means of a questionnaire that was distributed by fieldworkers, while data for the supply side were collected online. The data were analysed using descriptive statistics, factor analyses and one-way analysis of variance.

Findings

Five specific tourist motivations for visiting Victoria Falls were identified using demand data, of which sightseeing and destination attributes were the most important. Significant differences were found for tourists’ cross-border experiences using different border access points. Using supply data, challenges and opportunities of cross-border marketing were analysed. The most important opportunity was identified as cooperation, while the key challenges were economic and policy related. It is important to see the bigger picture and how cooperation can benefit both countries, which is unfortunately not currently the case for Zambia and Zimbabwe.

Practical implications

There is a need for tourism destinations to shift from competition-based strategies to collaboration-based strategies in order to be successful. Cross-border marketing requires that each country understands tourists’ motivations and experiences. For Zambia and Zimbabwe to increase their tourist arrivals, income and investment opportunities, both countries must move away from isolating their marketing efforts of Victoria Falls. It is important to look beyond the individual benefits for each country and focus on the combined benefits. The challenges identified in this study must be addressed if Zambia and Zimbabwe’s cross-border marketing of Victoria Falls is to be effective. The integration of demand and supply views is thus critical for cross-border marketing to be effective and successful.

Originality/value

Research on cross-border destination marketing of shared border attractions is limited. With regard to Victoria Falls, such research has never been explored in an academic context. This study has value for destination marketers of Zambia and Zimbabwe, especially for attractions that are shared between their borders such as Victoria Falls and Kariba Dam. Additionally, the study has implications for attractions that are shared across the borders of southern African countries like Zimbabwe, South Africa and Mozambique, as well as other attractions shared between borders in the global context.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Yvonne von Friedrichs Grängsjö

Owing to the complexity of the tourist product most firms in a tourist destination are interdependent on one another. As well as being competitors they also have to work…

Abstract

Owing to the complexity of the tourist product most firms in a tourist destination are interdependent on one another. As well as being competitors they also have to work together on creating the overall quality of the total tourist product. It is difficult to separate co‐operation from competition. The purpose of this paper is to discuss a co‐opetitive theory of business derived from the results given by a networking study of marketing a tourist destination dominated by micro businesses and independent entrepreneurs. The results of the study show that there are two different sets of values in the destination and these determine and distinguish the way firms are involved in networking.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

John Heeley

The purpose of this paper is to trace the emergence of a dominant paradigm from within which academics and practitioners alike currently describe and otherwise explain…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to trace the emergence of a dominant paradigm from within which academics and practitioners alike currently describe and otherwise explain urban destination marketing. The paradigm has been dubbed the “theory of marketing competitive advantage (CA)” by the author, and by others as the “4P’s marketing paradigm”. To effectively market themselves as tourism destinations, this paradigm requires towns and cities to differentiate themselves through the provision of more or less unique products, based on which they subsequently undertake branding, market positioning, distribution and other activities through bespoke destination marketing organisations (DMOs).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper summarises the findings of: first, a review of the academic and practitioner literature on urban destination marketing; second, an online investigation of urban destination marketing in 62 European towns and cities, consulting the corporate and consumer pages of the relevant DMO website; and third, in-depth interviews with 20 senior DMO departmental executives. Each interview was recorded digitally for subsequent transcribing, and was conducted on the basis of a semi-structured interview schedule.

Findings

Theory, as enshrined in the “4P’s marketing paradigm” rarely holds up in practice. Irrespective of whether or not a town or city possesses CA (and few do), DMO marketing gravitates almost inexorably towards a “marketing of everything”. Moreover, much the greater part of urban destination marketing is ineffective, failing to create visitors and deliver the commercial and economic returns on which it is premised. Against a backdrop of DMO marginality and ineffectiveness and a reluctance by them to market what is special and different about places, the continued existence of DMOs and the destination marketing they undertake is thrown into serious question.

Research limitations/implications

Interpretation is unavoidably subjective in parts, drawing on personal experience as well as research undertaken.

Originality/value

This paper is intended to give the reader an understanding of why success is so problematic in urban destination marketing, serving as an antidote to the prevailing idealised, normative and unproblematic picture of the DMO world as this is depicted from within the prevailing “4P’s marketing paradigm”. The research method provides a basis on which to unite theory and practice in the field of urban destination marketing in a more systematic and verifiable manner than has hitherto ever been the case.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Haris Machlouzarides

The purpose of this paper is to extend the understanding about the augmented destination marketing process that has resulted from the introduction of electronic marketing

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to extend the understanding about the augmented destination marketing process that has resulted from the introduction of electronic marketing methods. It attempts to identify the factors that contribute to the process of destination marketing by introducing an integrated marketing model. This study aims to expand the domain of knowledge about the tourist buying behavior by putting forward a framework to manage the destination marketing process for Cyprus.

Design/methodology/approach

The research design adopted for this study is an exploratory one, deploying the open‐ended approach of grounded theory. A number of expert interviews are performed with senior marketing executives at the Cyprus Tourism Organization (CTO), while an extensive study of the existing procedures that are being followed in carrying out the CTO's marketing department's functions facilitated further information analysis. The actual users' expectations are derived from a web‐user behavior analysis, reflecting upon relevant marketing theories and information systems approaches.

Findings

The paper provides insights into the augmented process of destination marketing planning and suggests specific ways through which National Tourism Organizations can manage it efficiently. The contribution of this study towards building on the body of knowledge is significant as the process of destination marketing planning is characterized by complexity due to the diverse interests of the stakeholders involved.

Originality/value

This paper successfully introduces the concept of integrated marketing as the sole enabler for the CTO to maximize the effectiveness of its marketing efforts worldwide.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Technology, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-9880

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 20000