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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Myroslava Hladchenko

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the comparative analysis of the Balanced Scorecards of four higher education institutions and aims to define the general framework…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the comparative analysis of the Balanced Scorecards of four higher education institutions and aims to define the general framework of the Balanced Scorecard for the higher education institution which concerns: the structure and elements of the Balanced Scorecard; development of the Balanced Scorecards on the different levels of the management system of the higher education institution; definition of the main functions of the Balanced Scorecard which it performs in the process of the strategic management of the German higher education institutions. Balanced Scorecard is analyzed as a strategic management system that translates a higher education institution’s strategy into a comprehensive set of performance measures that provides a framework for a strategic measurement and management system.

Design/methodology/approach

The comparative content analysis of the Balanced Scorecards of one Austrian and three German higher education institutions – Johanes Gutenberg University Mainz, Münster University of Applied Sciences (Fachhochschule Münster), Cologne University of Applied Sciences (Fachhochschule Köln), Montan University Leoben.

Findings

Using a comparative analysis of the Balanced Scorecards of four higher education institutions this paper argues that Balanced Scorecard provides a systemic view of the strategy of a higher education institution. It ensures a full complex framework for implementation and controlling of the strategy and sets a basis for further learning in the process of the strategic management of the higher education institution according to the scheme “plan-do-check-act”.

Research limitations/implications

This paper provides a basis for the substantial further work on the development of the general framework of the Balanced Scorecard for the higher education institution.

Practical implications

The framework presented in this paper can be used as the basis for the development of general framework of the Balanced Scorecard of the higher education institution.

Social implications

The framework presented in this paper can be used as the basis for the development of general framework of the Balanced Scorecard of the higher education institution.

Originality/value

This paper indicates the particularities of the structure and elements of the Balanced Scorecard, its development in the different levels of the management system of the higher education institution.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Zamzulaila Zakaria, Susela Devi Selvaraj and Zarina Zakaria

To provide evidence on the establishment of the internal audit function in the higher education institutions in Malaysia and also to obtain the perceptions of the…

Abstract

Purpose

To provide evidence on the establishment of the internal audit function in the higher education institutions in Malaysia and also to obtain the perceptions of the management of the higher education institutions towards the role and scope of the internal audit.

Design/methodology/approach

Sample consisted of 17 public universities and 49 private universities in Malaysia and variables used by Gordon and Fischer were adopted for this study.

Findings

The findings revealed that a substantial number of private institutions of higher education do not have an internal audit function. The study also indicates that the management of both types of institutions have similar perceptions on the role of internal auditors and the important audit areas as there are no significant differences between public and private institutions of higher education.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation of this study is that it only examines whether the scope of internal audit covers the areas mentioned by treasury circular or the IIA Guideline. It ignored the extent to which the higher education institutions comply with both guidelines. It is, therefore, suggested that future research could consider the degree of compliance to the above guidelines. The difference in the role of internal auditing between the education sector and other industries represents an interesting area for further research. Also, since this study only focuses on the perceptions of the management and the internal auditor themselves, the perception of other parties such as regulators and the audit committee on the role of internal audit in institutions of higher education will be an interesting area to explore for future research.

Practical implications

The failure to establish an internal audit function in the private universities calls for government intervention to ensure the existence of an internal audit function in the private sector higher education institutions.

Originality/value

The findings of this paper will be important in further refining the scope of the internal audit function in the higher educations institutions in Malaysia, especially to policymakers concerned with regulations governing the internal audit function.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 21 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

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Book part
Publication date: 30 December 2011

Kathryn Mohrman, Yingjie Wang and Xu Li

This chapter examines the development of a quality assurance system for undergraduate education as one aspect of the transformation of education policy in China. The…

Abstract

This chapter examines the development of a quality assurance system for undergraduate education as one aspect of the transformation of education policy in China. The central structure of the chapter is the process/stages of policy development and implementation, with particular attention to the changes over time in central control versus institutional autonomy. The Chinese government has moved to a “steering at a distance” approach with ex post accountability, giving institutions of higher education greater autonomy for undergraduate education. Government authority continues to be strong, however, even though the mechanisms of control have changed. This study provides an analysis of quality assurance in Chinese higher education and the changing relationship between government and campuses, using the lens of policy development and implementation.

Details

The Impact and Transformation of Education Policy in China
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-186-2

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Book part
Publication date: 13 March 2012

Futao Huang

Since 1999, there has been a rapid expansion in enrollment in Chinese higher education. By 2003, its gross enrollment had risen to 17 percent of the age-cohort (which…

Abstract

Since 1999, there has been a rapid expansion in enrollment in Chinese higher education. By 2003, its gross enrollment had risen to 17 percent of the age-cohort (which typically refers to the age group from 18 to 22 in China and 18 to 21 in Japan), indicating that Chinese higher education had entered the phase of mass higher education, according to Martin Trow's definition. Mass higher education in China was achieved nearly 40 years later than in Japan, but it is still worth conducting a comparative study. This chapter is concerned with similarities and differences in massification of higher education between China and Japan and focuses on the character, tendency, and policy choice of massification of these two systems of higher education in a comparative perspective. First, by reviewing rationales and policies for massification of higher education in the two countries, it is pointed out that although both countries share similarities, massification of higher education in Japan was greatly influenced by industrial demand, while in China it was heavily affected by a rapid increase in more graduates from senior higher schools and by unemployment. Second, how mass higher education was achieved in the two countries is examined. Third, based on quantitative analyses, this chapter illustrates the two types of massification of higher education arising from differences in the history and traditions of higher education institutions, political influences, social backgrounds, and international contexts. Finally, the chapter considers the progress of massification of Chinese higher education and puts forward some recommendations at the policy level for the further development of higher education in China in light of the Japanese experiences.

Details

As the World Turns: Implications of Global Shifts in Higher Education for Theory, Research and Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-641-6

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Book part
Publication date: 12 November 2012

Dobrochna Hildebrandt-Wypych

The aim of the chapter is to investigate the changing structural position of post-secondary schools in Poland, seen from the perspective of the expansion of higher

Abstract

The aim of the chapter is to investigate the changing structural position of post-secondary schools in Poland, seen from the perspective of the expansion of higher education from one side and the current reform of vocational education from the other. Do post-secondary schools enhance opportunities for those who might not otherwise consider further education, especially when we consider lower cost, open admissions and greater accessibility in comparison with higher education institutions? Or do they play a role of a ‘discounted’ and ‘undervalued’ education for those who could not manage to enter three-year-bachelor cycles in tertiary education and thus were forced to lower their initial educational aspirations? The opening up of higher education to new student populations was done by the rapid expansion of the private (paid for) sector and the fee-paying courses in the public sector. Liberal educational policy not only opened an opportunity for the privatization in higher education, but also expanded the market-driven provision at the post-secondary level. The discussion on the relevance of post-secondary vocational qualifications must be seen within the context of the continual inflation of diplomas/degrees and the unemployment of graduates after finishing higher education. Since 2010, there has been a reverse process initiated at the governmental level in Poland: reform schemes to increase the participation of young people in vocational education and training. However, the structural position and functions of post-secondary schools, as well as their role in the employability of young people, are not subject to any open discussion at the political level. This sort of status quo concerning post-secondary institutions means that their institutional identity issues are resolved and their structural position defined predominantly by market forces.

Details

Community Colleges Worldwide: Investigating the Global Phenomenon
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-230-1

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2020

Bokolo Anthony Jnr

This study aims to explore the current Green practices implemented in Malaysia higher education institutions toward sustainability attainment by developing a…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the current Green practices implemented in Malaysia higher education institutions toward sustainability attainment by developing a multi-disciplinary comprehensive policy framework to further extend the collaboration among sustainability practitioners in providing integrated data on Green indicators linked to economic, social and environmental dimensions of sustainability in higher education institutions.

Design/methodology/approach

Primary data which comprises of sustainability archival documents from sixteen universities in Malaysia was used to explore the extent of Green practice for sustainability. In addition, this study also used secondary data from existing literature on sustainable development in Malaysia higher education institutional context.

Findings

Findings from the examined 16 universities and prior sustainability studies in Malaysia universities suggest that higher education institutions in Malaysia are presently implementing Green practices in their university campuses toward attaining sustainability.

Research limitations/implications

Qualitative data is only collected from higher education institutions in Malaysia. Hence, findings from this study cannot be generalized to universities in other countries.

Practical implications

This study provides insights toward infusing Green campus paradigms from a technological perspective to facilitate the exchange of information between sustainability practitioners to produce innovative solutions for addressing sustainability challenges.

Social implications

This research developed a policy framework that provides trans-disciplinary approach to be adopted by higher education institutions in Malaysia and further beyond toward attaining sustainability. Socially, this study provides Green indicators that act as a reference manual and road map toward sustainable development in higher education institutions.

Originality/value

A novel multi-disciplinary comprehensive policy framework is developed grounded on identified Green indicators integrated to provide information on how sustainability practitioners can implement Green practices paradigms across universities. Furthermore, the Green indicators can be used as metrics to provide data for Green practice measurement and monitoring in higher education institutions.

Details

Journal of Science and Technology Policy Management, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4620

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Article
Publication date: 16 October 2009

Deogratias Bugandwa Mungu Akonkwa

The purpose of this paper is to encourage the development of a research stream on the market orientation concept in higher education. Specifically, the author explains why…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to encourage the development of a research stream on the market orientation concept in higher education. Specifically, the author explains why this concept has emerged as a potentially relevant strategy to manage higher educational institutions. The paper raises the main problems surrounding the use of market orientation in higher education, and thereby, suggests an extensive research agenda which is expected to improve the importation of marketing concepts in higher education.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on an extensive critical literature review on market orientation, and a document analysis to grasp the major changes that have affected higher education institutions' context since the middle of the 1980s. A bulk of research agenda is proposed and summarised in a table. The different topics are rooted in the link the author has attempted to put between marketing theory and higher educational context.

Findings

Research on market orientation in higher education still has many rooms to explore. These are: competition, quality issues, the impact of budget cuts on marketing implementation and market orientation operationalisation, etc.

Originality/value

While the market orientation strategy has been widely studied in commercial sector, its use in public and non‐profit sector such as higher education is still unsatisfactory. The paper: points on the limits of conceptual transpositions; discusses why market orientation is important to face the new context of higher education; and raises a number of research directions that have tremendous promises in the endeavour to build richer theories of marketing management, and to address significant problems of marketing practice in higher education.

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Nigusse W. Reda

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to highlight the congruence and roles of the balanced scorecard in the quality assurance practices in higher education

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to highlight the congruence and roles of the balanced scorecard in the quality assurance practices in higher education institutions, and second, to propose a balanced scorecard model for higher education institutions.

Design/methodology/approach

A descriptive literature review was used to understand the balanced scorecard, quality assurance practice (System model) and characteristics of the higher education institutions.

Findings

Used appropriately, the philosophical tenets of the perspectives of the balanced scorecard seem to be congruent with the input, process and output dimensions of quality assurance practices. Thus, if the core functions of higher education are explicitly represented in each perspective, the balanced scorecard seems important for materializing the input, process and output dimensions of quality assurance in higher education institutions. It may help to track and measure the status of higher education institutions in each quality assurance dimension and ultimately help to align each dimension with the university’s vision.

Research limitations/implications

The paper relied on the description of previous literature. Therefore, as it did not depend on the empirical evidences, the conclusions derived in the paper are more argumentative.

Practical implications

The paper will add an input to the ongoing discussions on the applications of the balanced scorecard to higher education institutions. Moreover, the proposed model of the balanced scorecard may help higher education managers to assess the performances of higher education institutions and their academic disciplines according to their areas of excellence.

Originality/value

This paper attempts to undertake a literature review on the balanced scorecard and its roles to the quality assurance practices in higher education. In addition, the congruence between the balanced scorecard and the contemporary characteristics of the higher education institutions is also explored.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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Article
Publication date: 23 September 2013

Mahsood Shah, Chenicheri Sid Nair and Lorraine Bennett

This paper aims to make a contribution to the current lack of literature in the Australian context by reviewing qualitative feedback collected from students in five…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to make a contribution to the current lack of literature in the Australian context by reviewing qualitative feedback collected from students in five private higher education institutions. In particular, the paper seeks to examine factors influencing student choice to study at private higher education institutions and student perceptions of such institutions. Previous studies on this topic are mostly focussed on universities with lack of research with the booming private higher education sector.

Design/methodology/approach

This study draws data from five different private for-profit higher education institutions in Australia. It involved feedback from 120 students undertaking higher education courses in different discipline areas at different stages of study. The study involved 15 focus group interviews with eight students in a group. The selection of students was based on the representation of different characteristics of student such as: male/female, domestic/international, and discipline areas.

Findings

An analysis of the data collected from the students across these five institutions indicated that the main factors influencing student choice can be grouped in six domains. These are: student perception; access and opportunity; learning environments; quality of teachers; course design; and graduate success. This study reinforces that student perception of the private for-profit higher education institutions is an important factor in influencing student choice to study at the institution.

Research limitations/implications

The limitation of the study was the ability to interview more students from larger colleges, across all discipline areas. However, the time and length of the focus group interviews was largely managed by the five institutions.

Originality/value

The private higher education sector has experienced consistent growth in the last few years in Australia. Currently, there is no qualitative research done in Australian private higher education on factors influencing student choice to study with private institutions. The rise of such providers require research on insights about student choice, student expectation and their experience.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Evelyn Chiyevo Garwe

It is considered a mystery by many people that, despite charging significantly higher fees when compared to public institutions, research has shown an increase in the…

Abstract

Purpose

It is considered a mystery by many people that, despite charging significantly higher fees when compared to public institutions, research has shown an increase in the demand and enrolments at private higher education institutions. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the critical factors considered by students when deciding to make private higher education institutions their institution of choice.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a case study approach and draws data from all the six private higher education institutions in Zimbabwe. Self-administered questionnaires were given to students representing at least 5 per cent of the student enrolment and representing all gender, study disciplines and levels of study from each university.

Findings

Irrespective of gender, six main factors influencing student choice were identified to be, in order of priority: access and opportunity; promotional information and marketing; reference or influence by others; quality of teaching and learning; fees and cost structure, and finally academic reputation and recognition.

Research limitations/implications

The research was focused on a case study of Zimbabwe.

Practical implications

The study has implications on the way private higher education institutions market, manage and sustain the quality of educational provision. The study therefore provides private institutions with useful and practical insights on what students want in their institution of choice. This will assist these institutions in strategising in order to sustain or gain competitive advantage and to maximise on the increasing demand for private education. Implications to government and public institutions are also given.

Social implications

The study recognises the critical role played by private universities in improving access and recommends African Governments who face financial and resource constraints to fund and expand public universities to encourage private higher education as a meaningful and viable way to improve access and provide higher education opportunities to potential students.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the current dearth of literature on factors influencing student choice to study with private institutions.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

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