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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2021

Yanina Chevtchouk, Cleopatra Veloutsou and Robert A. Paton

The marketing literature uses five different experience terms that are supposed to represent different streams of research. Many papers do not provide a definition, most…

1269

Abstract

Purpose

The marketing literature uses five different experience terms that are supposed to represent different streams of research. Many papers do not provide a definition, most of the used definitions are unclear, the different experience terms have similar dimensionality and are regularly used interchangeably or have the same meaning. In addition, the existing definitions are not adequately informed from other disciplines that have engaged with experience. This paper aims to build a comprehensive conceptual framework of experience in marketing informed by related disciplines aiming to provide a more holistic definition of the term.

Design/methodology/approach

This research follows previously established procedures by conducting a systematic literature review of experience. From the approximately 5,000 sources identified in three disciplines, 267 sources were selected, marketing (148), philosophy (90) and psychology (29). To address definitional issues the analysis focused on enlightening four premises.

Findings

This paper posits that the term brand experience can be used in all marketing-related experiences and proposes four premises that may resolve the vagaries associated with the term’s conceptualization. The four premises address the what, who, how and when of brand experience and aim to rectify conceptual issues. Brand experience is introduced as a multi-level phenomenon.

Research limitations/implications

The suggested singular term, brand experience, captures all experiences in marketing. The identified additional elements of brand experience, such as the levels of experience and the revision of emotions within brand experience as a continuum, tempered by repetition, should be considered in future research.

Practical implications

The multi-level conceptualization may provide a greater scope for dynamic approaches to brand experience design thus providing greater opportunities for managers to create sustainable competitive advantages and differentiation from competitors.

Originality/value

This paper completes a systematic literature review of brand experience across marketing, philosophy and psychology which delineates and enlightens the conceptualization of brand experience and presents brand experience in a multi-level conceptualization, opening the possibility for further theoretical, methodological and interdisciplinary promise.

Article
Publication date: 17 August 2012

Seema Gupta

The extant literature on experience marketing takes a narrow functional approach engaging with issues like defining an experience brand and recommending strategies for…

3369

Abstract

Purpose

The extant literature on experience marketing takes a narrow functional approach engaging with issues like defining an experience brand and recommending strategies for creating a unique customer experience. The purpose of this research is to focus on the cross‐level interdependencies in the organization and examine interrelatedness between business strategy and experience marketing.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on the extant literature on business strategy and experience marketing and investigating an in‐depth case study on experience marketing this article arrives at strategic principles of experience marketing. It uses an in depth analysis of a case study of an experience hotel brand covering multiple facets of its business strategy in all its complexities. Data were collected from six sources of evidence: documents, archival records, interviews, direct observation, participant‐observation and physical artifacts. A total of 17 interviews lasting from one to several hours each were conducted with senior management. Analysis of the benchmark case was combined with extensive review of literature on business strategy to draw strategic principles of experience marketing which are amenable to further evaluation for enhanced generalizability.

Findings

The six dimensions of business strategy: customer orientation, unique company capabilities, barriers to imitation, internal marketing, employee empowerment, and visionary leadership were found to be interrelated with experience marketing. This article also brings focus on research on cross‐level dependencies by outlining a detailed agenda for future research and operationalizing the constructs.

Originality/value

The linking of experience marketing with business strategy is a novel perspective as the extant literature deals with the subject only in the context of the functional area of marketing.

Article
Publication date: 8 June 2018

Eran Ketter

The experience economy is characterized by the consumers’ search for emotions and memorable experiences through consumption. While the experience economy has a fundamental…

2765

Abstract

Purpose

The experience economy is characterized by the consumers’ search for emotions and memorable experiences through consumption. While the experience economy has a fundamental effect on tourists’ decision-making and their consumer behavior, only a limited number of past studies have examined the relations between the experience economy and destination marketing campaigns. To extend the scope of the existing knowledge, this paper aims to explore the use of experience marketing in destination marketing campaigns.

Design/methodology/approach

The study conducts a qualitative case study analysis of six national tourism marketing campaigns, i.e. it examines the use of experience marketing in tourism campaigns and the use of the strategic experiential module as an analysis framework for destination marketing campaigns.

Findings

The findings reveal an influence of experience marketing on the examined marketing campaigns as destinations highlight the motifs of memorable experiences, engaging people’s senses and creating meaning. In accordance with the strategic experiential module, the campaigns analyzed shift the marketing focal point from the characteristics of the destination to the tourists’ experiences of sensing, feeling, thinking, acting and relating.

Originality/value

The conclusions of the study contribute both to scholars and practitioners, extending the present knowledge of the link between experience marketing and tourism marketing, illustrating the effect of experience marketing on destination marketing and shedding new light on the role of the experience economy and experience marketing in tourism marketing campaigns.

Book part
Publication date: 28 December 2016

Kyung-Hyan Yoo and Ulrike Gretzel

To analyze and discuss the role of ICTs and the emerging trends and issues in marketing tourism experiences.

Abstract

Purpose

To analyze and discuss the role of ICTs and the emerging trends and issues in marketing tourism experiences.

Methodology/approach

Previous conceptual frameworks are reviewed and key issues and trends are identified as central for ICT-based tourism marketing. Case studies are presented to illustrate how the marketing issues could be translated into practical tourism marketing strategies.

Findings

(1) Based on the literature, a conceptual model that outlines a technology-empowered marketing approach for co-created tourism experiences is presented. (2) The identified key trends in marketing tourism experiences include the changing overall role of marketers, a growth in mobile marketing opportunities, the emergence of smart destinations and their varied implications for marketing. (3) The case studies show the integrated and strategic role of social media platforms, hashtags, photography, location-based geofilters, augmented reality and videography in marketing tourism experiences.

Originality/value

This chapter conceptually outlines the technology-empowered tourism marketing approach and the role of marketers and various other players in tourism experience co-creation. The case studies provide practical implications for ICT-based tourism marketing.

Details

The Handbook of Managing and Marketing Tourism Experiences
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-289-7

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 June 2022

Sara Dassouli, Virginia Bodolica, Harit Satt and Mohamed M'hamdi

This paper aims to examine the specific role that partnerships play in the relationship between adaptation strategy, international experience, and export performance of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the specific role that partnerships play in the relationship between adaptation strategy, international experience, and export performance of handicraft firms in an emerging country setting. The authors' purpose is to identify the key factors that may contribute to the success of export activities of small handicraft companies in international markets.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on a non-probability sampling technique, the authors collected survey data from 410 handicraft companies located in Morocco. The authors' conceptual model, which draws on the network theory, was tested using covariance-based Structural Equation Modeling by means of AMOS 24 Software.

Findings

The results indicate that adaptation marketing strategy and partnerships impact positively the export performance of handicraft firms. Partnerships also play an intermediary role by partially (fully) mediating the relationship between adaptation strategy (international experience) and export performance.

Practical implications

This study may assist marketers and entrepreneurs in handicraft companies to better understand the causal relationship between adaptation strategy, marketing experience and export performance of entrepreneurs' firms. Managers in these companies should be aware of the importance that partnerships play in boosting the export performance through marketing practices and experience.

Originality/value

The authors' paper contributes to the scant literature on the adaptation marketing strategy and export performance and the intermediary role of partnerships in the specific context of handicraft businesses operating in North African emerging markets, namely Morocco.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 30 July 2018

Abstract

Details

Marketing Management in Turkey
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-558-0

Article
Publication date: 31 January 2022

Fayrene Chieng, Piyush Sharma, Russel PJ Kingshott and Rajat Roy

This paper aims to examine the differences in the process by which three types of self-congruity (actual, ideal and social) interact with the need for uniqueness (NFU) to…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the differences in the process by which three types of self-congruity (actual, ideal and social) interact with the need for uniqueness (NFU) to influence brand loyalty via brand experience and brand attachment.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey with 428 members of an Australian consumer panel. The data are analyzed using the structural equation modeling (SEM).

Findings

The results show that social self-congruity (SSC) has a direct effect on the brand attachment, but actual and ideal self-congruity (ASC and ISC) influence it only indirectly through brand experience. Moreover, the NFU strengthens the positive effect of ISC but weakens the effect of SSC on brand attachment.

Research limitations/implications

This study uses publicly consumed brands and the NFU as the moderator. Future research may study privately consumer brands and use other moderators, such as regulatory focus (promotion vs prevention).

Originality/value

This study extends current research on brand attachment by highlighting the positive influence of SSC on brand attachment. It also establishes the mediating role of brand experience and the moderating role of the NFU. These are new insights about the underlying process and the boundary conditions for the well-established relationship between self-congruity and brand attachment.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 25 January 2022

Namita Roy and Ulrike Gretzel

Luxury has received attention from tourism researchers as an important element of the gastronomic tourism experience. With recent research suggesting food and wine tourism…

Abstract

Luxury has received attention from tourism researchers as an important element of the gastronomic tourism experience. With recent research suggesting food and wine tourism being connected to luxury, it is important to explore how gastronomic tourism experiences are marketed to create such perceptions and feelings of luxury. This chapter aims to understand marketing strategies that support luxury gastronomic tourism experiences. In contrast to the definition of luxury as a performance or a value, this research conceptualises luxury as an affect which is sensed and felt in gastronomic tourism experiences. How this conceptualisation translates into marketing practice is explored for a particular gastronomic region. An in-depth analysis of the website of a destination marketing organisation in the Hunter Valley gastronomic region of Australia shows that the gastronomic tourism experience is marketed as bucolic luxury using marketing strategies of connection, congregation and repetition, all of which channel and maintain the affect of bucolic luxury. The chapter contributes to the literature on luxury marketing in the tourism context by identifying marketing strategies that can augment the affect of luxury for the gastronomy tourist.

Details

The Emerald Handbook of Luxury Management for Hospitality and Tourism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-901-7

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

Joanna Minkiewicz, Kerrie Bridson and Jody Evans

The increased involvement of customers in their experience is a reality for all service organisations. The purpose of this paper is to explore the way organisations…

1948

Abstract

Purpose

The increased involvement of customers in their experience is a reality for all service organisations. The purpose of this paper is to explore the way organisations collaborate with customers to facilitate consumption of cultural experiences through the lens of co-production. Although organisations are typically an integral part of the co-production process, co-production is typically considered from a consumer angle. Aligned with the service ecosystem perspective and value-in-cultural context, this research aims to provide greater insight into the processes and resources that institutions apply to co-produce experiences with consumers and the drivers and inhibitors of such processes.

Design/methodology/approach

Case study research with three exemplar organisations, using in-depth interviews with key informants was used to investigate the processes organisations follow in co-producing the service experience with customers, as well as the drivers and inhibitors of organisational co-production of the service experience in the cultural sector.

Findings

The findings illuminate that cultural organisations are co-producing the service experience with their customers, as revealed through a number of key processes: inviting customers to actively participate in the experience, engaging customers and supporting customers in the co-production of the experience. Increasingly demanding consumers and a changing competitive landscape are strong external drivers of co-production. Visionary leadership and consumer-focussed employees are internal factors impelling organisations to co-produce experiences with consumers. A strong curatorial orientation, complex organisational structure, employee attitude and capability gaps and funding constraints are impediments towards organisations co-producing experiences with consumers.

Originality/value

This paper addresses a gap in Service-Dominant logic theory, arts/cultural marketing and broader services marketing literature by proposing a broadened conceptualisation of co-production of the service experience. This conceptualisation can be used as a platform to derive strategic imperatives for managers of service organisations. The findings highlight the key practices and resources that are central to organisations co-producing experience with customers. In this way, greater understanding of institutional logics and practices that underpin experience co-production emerges.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 30 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 September 2009

Henrikki Tikkanen, Joel Hietanen, Tuomas Henttonen and Joonas Rokka

Drawing from recent work on online social networking and communities of consumption, the purpose of this paper is to explore, identify, and postulate key factors…

8712

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing from recent work on online social networking and communities of consumption, the purpose of this paper is to explore, identify, and postulate key factors facilitating the growth and success of marketing in virtual worlds.

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical study was conducted employing netnographic evidence from three different virtual worlds and related user‐generated blog discussions.

Findings

The findings suggest mechanisms which enable virtual worlds to gain and maintain the interest of their users and therefore underlie successful marketer practices.

Research limitations/implications

This is an exploratory study based on qualitative and ethnographic online research methods, and therefore the results are of a descriptive nature. The study was conducted to initiate the academic discourse about marketing in virtual worlds. As such, the paper believes that it can act as a reasonable starting‐point for future discussion.

Practical implications

The study suggests that traditional advertising has not proven to be a very effective way to exploit the special characteristics of virtual worlds. There is substantial potential in virtual worlds for new and innovative marketing methods that are highly engaging and take advantage of users' active role in virtual worlds. From the marketing point of view, virtual worlds can be especially used for connecting with customers, contributing to customer learning, and getting customer input.

Originality/value

The paper illustrates that virtual worlds have come to offer marketers new opportunities for engaging their customers into interactive and co‐productive marketplace exchanges. They uncover untapped potential, resources and creative means for building customer relationships.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 47 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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