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Book part
Publication date: 24 August 2005

Takao Takahashi

Bioethics and environmental ethics have been largely separated, in principle. However, the two types of ethics do overlap when dealing with significant issues such as…

Abstract

Bioethics and environmental ethics have been largely separated, in principle. However, the two types of ethics do overlap when dealing with significant issues such as human embryos, animal experimentation, and responsibility to future generations. In this paper, the possibility of synthesizing these two ethics through the concept of care is considered. Accordingly, the range of the object of the concept of care is similarly broadened. Moreover, after considering the serious defects of care-based theory, a care-based position, which regards human rights or their substitute as a complement to care, is advanced. This position can be said to be a Japanese approach to bioethics.

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Taking Life and Death Seriously - Bioethics from Japan
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-206-1

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Article
Publication date: 16 January 2020

Paul Hayes and Damian Jackson

This paper aims to argue that traditional ethical theories used in disaster response may be inadequate and particularly strained by the emergence of new technologies and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to argue that traditional ethical theories used in disaster response may be inadequate and particularly strained by the emergence of new technologies and social media, particularly with regard to privacy. The paper suggests incorporation of care ethics into the disaster ethics nexus to better include the perspectives of disaster affected communities.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents a theoretical examination of privacy and care ethics in the context of social media/digitally enhanced disaster response.

Findings

The paper proposes an ethics of care can fruitfully by used by public and private agents in disaster management. Its relational ontology restores the priority of fostering good relationships between stakeholders, thus giving central importance to values such as transparency and trust and the situated knowledge of disaster-affected communities.

Research limitations/implications

This paper presents theoretical research and is limited by the availability of empirical data. There is opportunity for future research to evaluate the impact of a conscious adoption of an ethics of care by disaster management agents.

Practical implications

An ethos of care ethics needs to be mainstreamed into disaster management organisations and digital initiatives.

Social implications

This paper argues that power asymmetry in disaster response renders the public vulnerable to abuse, and that the adoption of care ethics can support disaster management agents in recognising this power imbalance and wielding power responsibly.

Originality/value

This paper examines the applicability of an alternative ethical framework to novel circumstances.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Luu Trong Tuan and Luu Thi Bich Ngoc

Clinical governance effectiveness is built on the responsibility of clinical members towards other stakeholders inside and outside the hospital. Through the testing of the…

Abstract

Purpose

Clinical governance effectiveness is built on the responsibility of clinical members towards other stakeholders inside and outside the hospital. Through the testing of the hypotheses on the relationships between clinical governance and its antecedents, this paper aims to corroborate that emotional intelligence is the first layer of bricks, ethics and trust the second layer, and corporate social responsibility (CSR) the third layer of the entire architecture of clinical governance.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 409 responses in completed form returned from self-administered structured questionnaires dispatched to 705 clinical staff members underwent the structural equation modeling (SEM)-based analysis.

Findings

Emotional intelligence among clinicians, as the data reveals, is the lever for ethics of care and knowledge-based or identity-based trust to thrive in hospitals, which in turn activate ethical CSR in clinical activities. Ethical CSR in clinical deeds will heighten clinical governance effectiveness in hospitals.

Originality/value

The journey to test research hypotheses has built layer-by-layer of CSR-based model of clinical governance in which high concentration of emotional intelligence among clinical members in the hospital catalyzes ethics of care and knowledge-based or identity-based trust, without which, CSR initiatives to cultivate ethical values cannot be successfully implemented to optimize clinical governance effectiveness in Vietnam-based hospitals.

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International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1997

Sara Reiter

The ethics of rights or the separative model has dominated Western thought since the Enlightenment and the ethics of care was developed as a feminist critique seeking to…

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5493

Abstract

The ethics of rights or the separative model has dominated Western thought since the Enlightenment and the ethics of care was developed as a feminist critique seeking to rebalance our basic thought structure. The ethics of care is used as a framework for analysis and as a visionary ideal to evaluate proposed changes in accounting practice. Reports on changes in conceptualizing accounting practice proposed by the AICPA’s special committees on assurance and financial reporting. The proposals challenge traditional views of accounting practice, based on rights thinking, and adopt concepts from new management theories compatible with the ethics of care. Contends that it is not clear to what extent these proposals, and other current proposals to address the problem of auditor independence, represent a real paradigm shift. The proposed changes are driven by an economic imperative to expand the scope of services of the profession and may result in a significant threat to the accounting profession’s claims to professional status.

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Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2011

Ilke Oruc and Muammer Sarikaya

This study aims at presenting a normative approach in adaptation of the ethics of care approach and stakeholder theory. Therefore, it seeks to present a point‐of‐view…

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4616

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims at presenting a normative approach in adaptation of the ethics of care approach and stakeholder theory. Therefore, it seeks to present a point‐of‐view regarding the related issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The study focuses on a theory‐based integration process, since it is designed on a normative basis and the current studies dealing with “ethic of care theory” still have some problems in practical terms.

Findings

It is observed that ethics of care and stakeholder theory are getting more and more interrelated due to established networks and available common points. As a subfield of feminist ethic, ethics of care can be used to clarify moral principles lying behind these relationships. From another point of view, the discussion regarding the feminization of business enterprises focuses on the idea that such discussions involving the principles lying behind feminist ethics can provide an advantage for the companies in terms of competition. In addition, ethics of care is expected to contribute to stakeholder theory to a great extent.

Research limitations/implications

The related literature includes a rather limited number of studies conducted on this research topic. The available research explains some relationships on a normative basis. Therefore, the current study is expected to contribute to the expansion of such research in the field.

Practical implications

Despite the presence of studies in the field, there is still a limitation in putting the findings of studies into practice. Since the country where the current study is conducted still suffers from ambiguities regarding the definitions of concepts and it is very difficult to find business enterprises appreciating feminist values, although they are taught to adopt philanthropy applications, the study is limited to a normative point‐of‐view regarding the issues.

Originality/value

The scope of the study is expected to contribute to a great extent to the integration of feminist ethic and stakeholder theory. Similarly, it will encourage further studies on the issue.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2013

Kévin André

The aim of the paper is to show that, among business students, care ethics is a determinant for CSR perception and stakeholder inclusion.

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2484

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the paper is to show that, among business students, care ethics is a determinant for CSR perception and stakeholder inclusion.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was conducted utilising a quantitative approach. The population for this study consisted of students from a leading French business school.

Findings

Stakeholder inclusion is related to care ethics among students. CSR perception is related to stakeholder perception. CSR perception is related to care ethics.

Research limitations/implications

Population sampled has cultural and curricula specificities. Further research should extend the findings to other populations.

Practical implications

If business schools want their students to implement CSR when they later become managers, they should build a bridge in the curriculum between business ethics education based on care theory (“educare”) and CSR teaching.

Originality/value

Empirical exploration of the relationship between teaching CSR and teaching care ethics has not been undertaken. Relationship between care ethics and stakeholder theory has been addressed in the literature but only from a theoretical perspective and not from an empirical perspective.

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Kévin André

The purpose of the paper is to show that among business students, care ethics is a determinant for corporate social responsibility (CSR) perception and stakeholder inclusion.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to show that among business students, care ethics is a determinant for corporate social responsibility (CSR) perception and stakeholder inclusion.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was conducted using a quantitative approach. The population for this study consisted of students from a leading French business school.

Findings

Stakeholder inclusion is related to care ethics among students. CSR perception is related to stakeholder perception. CSR perception is related to care ethics.

Research limitations/implications

Population sampled has cultural and curricula specificities. Further research should extend the findings to other populations.

Practical implications

If business schools want their students to implement CSR when they later become managers, they should build a bridge in the curriculum between business ethics education based on the care theory (“educare”) and CSR teaching.

Originality/value

Empirical exploration of the relationship between teaching CSR and teaching care ethics has not been undertaken. Relationship between care ethics and stakeholder theory has been addressed in the literature but only from a theoretical perspective and not from an empirical perspective.

Details

Society and Business Review, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5680

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Alastair Campbell

This paper begins by discussing two contrasting approaches to health care. The first approach is that of principlism, which emphasises four universal principles: respect…

Abstract

This paper begins by discussing two contrasting approaches to health care. The first approach is that of principlism, which emphasises four universal principles: respect for autonomy; beneficence; non‐maleficence; and justice. The second approach is the ethics of care that emphasise the importance of the relationship between the cared‐for and the one caring, rather than abstract principles. The problems with both of these approaches are highlighted, before arguing that an approach based on virtue ethics is more appropriate and better suited to health care ethics. Finally, by drawing on the conclusions of research undertaken with chronically ill people, the paper explores what this approach might mean for an approach that stresses dignity as a core value in health care ethics.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Abstract

Details

Slow Ethics and the Art of Care
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-195-7

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Book part
Publication date: 11 December 2007

Helen Kohlen

The tradition of medicine has until now been characterized by an aspiration to provide as complete as possible a service of care to the populations to which it owes…

Abstract

The tradition of medicine has until now been characterized by an aspiration to provide as complete as possible a service of care to the populations to which it owes responsibility. The same holds for nursing and caring practices, but the tradition is loosening. Despite the collective assumption that medical and nursing practice rests on solid grounds of knowledge and is framed by a caring ethos, change in practice not only has typically come about in a complex and diffuse fashion, but has also come along with sacrifices, losses and deficits.

Details

Bioethical Issues, Sociological Perspectives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1438-6

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