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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2020

Ruchi Sinha and Christina Stothard

This paper aims to understand the effects of team power asymmetry (hierarchy) on team learning.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to understand the effects of team power asymmetry (hierarchy) on team learning.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature suggests that power asymmetry can hurt team learning due to unequal interactions. The authors integrate the situated focus theory of power and the theory of adversarial growth to propose that environmental hardship can moderate this relationship. Such that, under environmental hardship there is a shift in power relations within hierarchical teams, such that power asymmetry positively relates to team learning via increased team egalitarianism (interactional equality).

Findings

The study is presented in two parts. Part 1 reviews the literature and builds the theoretical arguments for the conceptual model, while Part 2 empirically examines the model on a sample of military teams. In Part 1, the authors propose a theoretically derived model and directions for future research in team power, dynamics and learning.

Research limitations/implications

It provides directions to empirically validate a contingency-based model to resolve the dilemma of creating equality and high levels of team learning in hierarchical teams.

Originality/value

The conceptual model and hypotheses contribute to the team learning literature by theoretically clarifying the conditions under which power asymmetry is likely to improve team learning.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 October 2010

Ebrahim Teimoury, Mehdi Fesharaki and Afshar Bazyar

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of mediated power asymmetry on relational risk perception and modes of governance mechanism (intention‐based trust and…

1006

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of mediated power asymmetry on relational risk perception and modes of governance mechanism (intention‐based trust and unilateral control).

Design/methodology/approach

Survey research was conducted to collect data from 112 new product development (NPD) relationships and structural equation modeling was conducted to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The results suggest that benefiting from mediated power asymmetries by a firm is positively related to the relational risk perceived by its partner firm. This perception influences intention‐based trust to partner firm negatively and exercising of unilateral control positively. It was also found that the relationship between mediated power asymmetry and governance modes is mediated by relational risk perception.

Originality/value

This paper enhances the understanding of NPD relationships by examining the key mechanisms through which governance decision modes are influenced. In particular, the paper shows how mediated power asymmetries through affecting relational risk perception influence two governance modes including intention‐based trust and unilateral control.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 October 2010

PohLean Chuah, Wai Peng Wong, T. Ramayah and M. Jantan

This paper aims to examine the relationships among supplier management practices, organizational context and supplier performance. The contexts selected for supplier…

3477

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the relationships among supplier management practices, organizational context and supplier performance. The contexts selected for supplier management practices are economics transactional practices and high involvement work practices (HIWP); while power asymmetry and competition intensity are considered within the organizational context.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey was conducted on a multinational semiconductor company. A two‐phase statistical analysis, which comprised phase one (reliability and factor analysis), and phase two (hierarchical multiple regression analysis), was used to analyze the data.

Findings

The study provides empirical evidence to support the conceptual and prescriptive statements in the literature regarding the impact of supplier management practices and the dynamics between organizational context and supplier management towards supplier performance. The results show that high involvement work practices (HIWP) mediate the impact of competition intensity on suppliers' quality performance and partially mediate the effect of competition intensity on suppliers' flexibility. The limitation of this study is that it does not use longitudinal data, which would be more useful to examine changes in variables that affect performance; nevertheless, as this study was conducted in‐house, it was able to control the extraneous factors.

Originality/value

The study provides important insights for managers to understand the disposition of the firm to better leverage organizational context by exploiting relationships with suppliers. The paper has extended organizational theory and marketing theory into a supply chain context. Moreover, it is among the first empirical work that specifically investigates the relationship between organizational context and supplier management practices; thus the paper fills an important gap in the supply chain literature.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2022

Qi Zou and Yuan Wang

Firms often struggle with opportunistic behavior from supply chain partners. Relying on Transaction Cost Economics and its extensions, this study developed a conceptual…

Abstract

Purpose

Firms often struggle with opportunistic behavior from supply chain partners. Relying on Transaction Cost Economics and its extensions, this study developed a conceptual model theorizing the antecedence, consequences and conditional factors of opportunism within a buyer–supplier–supplier triadic relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employed a cross-sectional survey data collected from 200 U.S. firms. The collected data were analyzed with SPSS and AMOS, the two statistical software, for reliability, validity, confirmatory factor analyses and structural equation modeling.

Findings

First, opportunism negatively influences operational performance and business performance, and such an effect is fully mediated by relationship stability. Second, this study classified power asymmetry as asymmetrical power discrepancy and asymmetrical power advantage with these two forms playing different roles in influencing opportunism. Results indicate that asymmetrical power discrepancy induces opportunism while asymmetrical power advantage strengthens the negative influence that opportunism has on relationship stability. Additionally, the mediated moderating effect of asymmetrical power advantage by relationship stability is confirmed.

Originality/value

The results provide significant academic and managerial insights that can guide managerial efforts in distinguishing types of power asymmetry, controlling opportunism and further mitigating the consequences of opportunism within a triadic relationship.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 60 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 July 2020

Krzysztof Kubacki, Dariusz Siemieniako and Linda Brennan

The purpose of this paper is to propose an integrative framework for vulnerability analysis in social marketing systems by identifying, investigating and problematising…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose an integrative framework for vulnerability analysis in social marketing systems by identifying, investigating and problematising the relationships among several interrelated concepts, including power, power asymmetry, vulnerability and resilience, in the context of social marketing systems.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual paper synthesising literature from social marketing, sociology and marketing management.

Findings

The main outcome of the discussion is a proposed integrative framework for vulnerability analysis. The framework identifies the main groups of stakeholders within a social marketing system and the bases for their power and consequential power asymmetries. It focusses on the types and states of vulnerability to identify the distinct characteristics of the social conditions of vulnerability for micro-level system actors. It leads to building positive resilience through efforts aiming to change the power asymmetries at the downstream, midstream and upstream levels.

Originality/value

The integrative framework for vulnerability analysis answers the call from Wood (2019) for the development of practical approaches to better understand resilience-building approaches in social marketing programmes. The framework provides reconciliation for diverse dimensions of vulnerability as a natural characteristic of all social marketing systems and as a universal, constant and inherent social condition.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2006

Satyabhusan Dash, Ed Bruning and Kalyan Ku Guin

The purpose of this cross‐cultural study is to examine the moderating effect of power distance on perceived interdependence and relationship quality in a bank‐corporate…

3513

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this cross‐cultural study is to examine the moderating effect of power distance on perceived interdependence and relationship quality in a bank‐corporate client relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through surveys administered to bank customers in India and Canada. Confirmatory Factor Analysis and Multiple Regression were employed to assess the relationships among model variables.

Findings

Results indicate that Power distance moderates the Interdependence and Relationship Quality Relationships.

Research limitations/implications

This research was limited to only Indian and Canadian customers and their banks. Only one dimension of culture was used as a moderator of the Interdependence and Relationship Quality relationship. The study is limited to a single dimension of service banking.

Practical implications

Buyer‐seller relationships are dependent on the specific cultural basis of the parties. Managers must be cognizant of the cultural values of the buyer/client in order to understand the most effective means of establishing and nurturing the buyer‐seller relationship.

Originality/value

Given that Values, Interdependence, Interdependence Asymmetry, Trust and Commitment are critically important to the development of effective relationships, statistical data are presented supporting the fact that an element of national culture (Power Distance) moderates the degree of interdependence and the strength of the trust‐commitment linkage. To date, these relationships have not been explored in an eastern cultural context.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Ruey-Jer “Bryan” Jean, Jyh-Shen Chiou and Rudolf R. Sinkovics

This study aims to explore how absorptive and joint learning can foster radical innovation. Furthermore, dependence asymmetry is investigated as a moderator of the effects…

1167

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore how absorptive and joint learning can foster radical innovation. Furthermore, dependence asymmetry is investigated as a moderator of the effects of these factors on radical innovation. Radical innovation is an important source of any firm’s success. Yet, there has been a dearth of research in the literature on how different types of inter-partner learning cultivate the process of generating such innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use a sample of 204 Taiwanese electronics suppliers to test the effects of joint learning and absorptive learning on radical innovation. The empirical analysis adopts a structural equations modeling approach.

Findings

The authors find that a supplier’s joint learning has a stronger effect on radical innovation than its absorptive learning. However, when accounting for the moderating effect of dependence asymmetry, the analysis shows that absorptive learning does have a significant effect on radical innovation. The effect of joint learning on radical innovation is not moderated by the degree of dependence asymmetry.

Practical Implications

This study broadens and deepens the understanding of how radical innovation by suppliers can be generated in customer–supplier relationships, and how this is shaped by the power-dependence structure.

Originality/value

Inter-partner learning; radical innovation; power; dependence.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 8 August 2022

Tim Gruchmann

While the literature on multitier supply chain management traditionally assumes that first-tier suppliers belong to the visible proportion of the supply base…

Abstract

Purpose

While the literature on multitier supply chain management traditionally assumes that first-tier suppliers belong to the visible proportion of the supply base, intermediaries might limit focal firms' visible horizon already at this stage. High power asymmetries promoting centrality and complexity in the supply network are seen as a particular root cause that limits the impact of governance mechanisms for sustainability. To map the space for governance mechanisms in a network-sensitive context more comprehensively, the study analyzes supply network characteristics from a power perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

This research is conceptual. To better understand power imbalances and mutual dependencies from network centrality and complexity, network configurations were constructed drawing on resource dependence theory. These configurations allow deducing the impact of (non-)mediated governance mechanisms for a sustainable development in the supply network. An agenda to stimulate future empirical and model-based research is accordingly presented.

Findings

The research shows that those networks with densely interconnected first-tier suppliers promote network centrality and complexity, leading to an inverted U-shape relationship between the focal firm's exertion of coercive power and the sustainability performance in the supply network. The findings allow a more comprehensive theoretical grounding for mapping governance approaches in a network-sensitive context and provide insights on how to avoid negative effects from power asymmetries.

Practical implications

The findings suggest the need for accompanying, indirect governance mechanisms already at the stage of first-tier suppliers based on non-mediated forms of power, such as referent power, also promoting disintermediation. Purchasing companies may also consider using digital platform technologies that foster disintermediation, such as blockchain technology.

Originality/value

By studying intermediaries from a power and network perspective, the conceptualization adds to the discussion on governance in multitier sustainable supply chain networks in various industries. Furthermore, it contributes to the increasing efforts of middle-range theorizing in logistics and supply chain management. The results partially challenge previous assumptions on the moderating role of specific network characteristics.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 November 2013

Simon Somogyi

This paper aims to discuss a study that investigated the relationship between grape growers and wineries in Australia. The results of the study led to the formulation of…

546

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss a study that investigated the relationship between grape growers and wineries in Australia. The results of the study led to the formulation of market segments which provided a better understanding of the relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Quantitative data were collected through an online survey, distributed to grape growers in all states of Australia. A total of 396 valid responses were obtained.

Findings

Cluster analysis highlighted three segments based on relational variables such as relationship quality and power and details of the grape growers' business and trading relationships. The paper showed that grape growers attained higher levels of relationship quality and power if they resided in cool climate wine regions, had short-term relationships with wineries and were in relationships with small and medium enterprise (SME) wineries. The paper also highlighted the interaction of relational variables and the price that a grower received for their grapes.

Research limitations/implications

The research was limited in terms of its geographic context. Future research could involve a wider geographic study based on the constructs used in this research and also focus on the winery perspective of the relationship in order to gain a dyadic perspective.

Practical implications

The Australian wine industry is experiencing difficult economic conditions. The paper has highlighted relationships that may not be sustainable and certain growers that may require assistance from government and wine industry peak bodies.

Originality/value

This paper presents a quantitative exposition of Australian grape grower and winery relationships that takes into account relational variables and trading and business details.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 May 2012

Maria Colurcio, Patricia Wolf, Pierre‐Yves Kocher and Tiziana Russo Spena

In innovation networks, SMEs' capability to innovate is both enhanced and restricted by more powerful or better positioned partners. The purpose of this article is to ask…

1353

Abstract

Purpose

In innovation networks, SMEs' capability to innovate is both enhanced and restricted by more powerful or better positioned partners. The purpose of this article is to ask how managers of processing SME suppliers in Italian and Swiss food innovation networks experience their relationships with innovation network partners and how they configure modes of interaction with them.

Design/methodology/approach

A series of problem centered interviews with managers of six Swiss and five Italian food sector SMEs was conducted.

Findings

Findings describe how SME managers in the two regions perceive the nature of interaction as well as benefits and disadvantages resulting from asymmetric relationships within networked innovation process. Differences in the perception frame and their impact on behavior in innovation networks are analyzed.

Research limitations/implications

The data are only valid for the food sector in the two regional markets. Furthermore, this paper only displays the perspective of managers of first and second processing food SME suppliers. Additional data should be gathered on the perspective of other network partners as well as on real‐time communication between them.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that active cooperation with especially customers in innovation networks supports innovation opportunities of processing food SME suppliers.

Originality/value

Scholars so far have comprehensively deduced potential advantages and problems resulting from asymmetries in power and positioning of partners for knowledge sharing in innovation networks but have not yet investigated its specifics. Particularly, empirical work on the perspective of managers from processing SME suppliers on innovation related cooperation with their partners in the value chain on networked innovation is yet almost scant.

1 – 10 of over 14000