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Book part
Publication date: 4 July 2019

Aleksei V. Bogoviz, Svetlana V. Lobova, Julia V. Ragulina and Alexander N. Alekseev

The purpose of the work is to determine the basic principles of “conflict-free” development of socio-economic systems.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the work is to determine the basic principles of “conflict-free” development of socio-economic systems.

Methodology

The theoretical and methodological platform for the research includes the principles of crisis management of economic systems, proclaimed within the theory of economic cycles and the theory of economic growth – the principle of risk insurance, the principles of closed economy, the principles of post-crisis innovational development, and the principle of foundation on the real sector of economy. The author substantiates non-applicability of these principles to “conflict-free” socio-economic systems and determines the basic principles of “conflict-free” development of socio-economic systems, which differ from the existing principles of crisis management of economic systems. For this, the method of modeling of socio-economic processes and systems and the method of formalization are used.

Conclusions

As a result of the research, the basic principles of “conflict-free” development of socio-economic systems are offered – the principle of self-regulation of socio-economic system, the principle of sustainability, the principle of stability, the principle of balance, the principle of systemic management of conflicts, and the principle of moderate openness. Due to these principles, contrary to crisis management, “conflict-free” development remains accessible for any modern socio-economic systems.

Originality/value

The offered principles allowed determining the landmarks of development of modern socio-economic systems that strive for “conflict-free” character. Based on these principles, it is possible to develop a fundamental platform for studying “conflict-free” socio-economic systems.

Book part
Publication date: 29 October 2018

Valentina N. Parakhina, Olga Boris, Pavel Timoshenko and Svetlana Panasenko

The purpose of the chapter is to develop and substantiate the principles of implementation of the innovational model of well-balanced information economy.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the chapter is to develop and substantiate the principles of implementation of the innovational model of well-balanced information economy.

Methodology

The methodology of the research consists of the method of analysis of causal connections, which is used for determining the need for proclaiming various principles of implementation of the innovational model of well-balanced information economy, evaluation and comparison of the possible methods of their observation, and studying possible consequences. This allows determining the optimal set of principles that allow – with the highest precision – implementing in practice the offered innovational model of well-balanced information economy.

Results

The author offers eight main principles of implementation of the innovational model of well-balanced information economy: principle of balance, principle of simultaneousness, principle of balance of state and entrepreneurial initiative, principle of innovational activity of personnel, principle of cyclicity, principle of feedback, principle of effectiveness, and principle of protection. They focus on peculiarities and key advantages of the innovational model of well-balanced information economy and guarantee its formation as a result of practical measures that are aimed at informatization of the economic system. These principles must be a guide for action for modern economic systems, and their strict observation will allow implementation of the offered optimal model, not just formation of information economy, thus guaranteeing its balance.

Recommendations

The developed principles are recommended to scientific and practical application.

Article
Publication date: 13 May 2022

Danilo de Melo Costa

Canada is a country that has a democratized higher education system, based on solid principles of access, quality and accountability. Brazil, on the other hand, is a…

Abstract

Purpose

Canada is a country that has a democratized higher education system, based on solid principles of access, quality and accountability. Brazil, on the other hand, is a country that seeks to advance its higher education system. For this reason, this paper aims to understand with the main stakeholders of the systems, the perceptions in relation to higher education in terms of access, quality and accountability, confronting two educational systems, the Brazilian and the Canadian.

Design/methodology/approach

The author applied an exploratory and qualitative method through categorical content analysis in a multicase study. Data were collected through 10 interviews with government managers, 18 unstructured (open) questionnaires, where 13 were applied to professors and experts in higher education and four to student leaders.

Findings

The results demonstrate that, for Canadian participants, these principles should guide any nation, as it is something demanded by society itself: democratic access to the system, that the available system has quality and that the resources allocated to the system are being well applied. In addition, Brazilian participants understand that it is necessary to deepen this debate, including a new principle: permanence, as it is a country of traditional social inequality.

Originality/value

This study presented the perceptions of an educational system based on the principles of access, quality and accountability, the Canadian system and the perspectives for a system that intends to develop in this context in Brazil.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 April 2022

Timo Dietrich, Erin Hurley, Jay Kassirer, Sharyn Rundle-Thiele, Robert W. Palmatier, Rowena Merritt, Scott K. Weaven and Nancy Lee

The purpose of this paper is synthesise social marketing literature over the past fifty years and deliver a set of guiding tenets to propel social marketing’s agenda forward.

1007

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is synthesise social marketing literature over the past fifty years and deliver a set of guiding tenets to propel social marketing’s agenda forward.

Design/methodology/approach

Across three strands, this paper amalgamates theoretical and practitioner evidence from social marketing. This synthesis commences with a review, summary and critical discussion of five decades of social marketing research. Across Strands 2 and 3, the authors review 412 social marketing interventions reported across 10 evidence reviews and 238 case studies.

Findings

This paper demonstrates social marketing’s use of fundamental marketing principles and capability to achieve behaviour change outcomes. Social marketers have built frameworks and processes that non-profit organisations, government agencies and policymakers seeking to enact change can use. This paper delivers five tenets that summarise the findings of the three strands and delivers research priorities for the next 50 years of social marketing research to drive the field forward.

Research limitations/implications

Drawing on five decades of learning, this paper proposes research priorities that can be applied to refine, recalibrate and future-proof social marketing’s success in making the world a better place.

Practical implications

This paper demonstrates the value of social marketing science and helps bridge gaps between theory and practice, and further strengthens social marketing’s value proposition. This paper provides confidence that money invested in social marketing programs is well spent.

Originality/value

This paper delivers a forward-looking perspective and provides social marketing academics and practitioners with confidence that it can assist in overcoming society’s most pressing issues. The paper encompasses key social marketing literature since it was founded 50 years ago. Five tenets will guide social marketing forward: evidencing marketing principles, operationalisation of processes, principles and activities, implementing systems thinking, creating and testing marketing theory and guiding a new social marketing era.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 56 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 March 2012

Golnaz Rezai, Zainalabidin Mohamed and Mad Nasir Shamsudin

The aim of this paper is to determine the factors that most likely influence non‐Muslims' understanding of Halal principles in a country where almost 60 percent of the…

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to determine the factors that most likely influence non‐Muslims' understanding of Halal principles in a country where almost 60 percent of the population is Muslim.

Design/methodology/approach

Cross‐sectional data were collected through a survey of 800 non‐Muslims in the Klang Valley, via structured questionnaires, to gather information on their understanding of Halal principles and food products. The logit model was applied to determine the extent to which socio environment factors influenced the respondents' understanding and familiarities with Halal principles and Halal food products.

Findings

The results of this study suggest that non‐Muslim consumers are aware of the existence of Halal food in Malaysia. In general, socio‐environmental factors such as mixing with Muslims socially and the presence of advertised Halal food significantly influence non‐Muslims' understanding of Halal principles. The findings also suggest that non‐Muslims understand that Halal principles are also concerned about food safety issues and environmentally friendly ways of doing things.

Research limitations/implications

The research used a quantitative method to analyse 800 non‐Muslim respondents in the Klang Valley only.

Practical implications

The practical implications extend to food policy decision makers and food marketers who might pursue strategies in their distribution and communication efforts which target the growing Halal food market segment among non‐Muslims. Dissemination of information plays an important role in making non‐Muslims improve their understanding of Halal principles.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to investigate the level of understanding of Halal principles among non‐Muslims in Malaysia.

Article
Publication date: 13 May 2014

Norman T. Sheehan and Grant E. Isaac

The authors show how organizations can best ensure that employees act in accordance with the corporation’s values. The key action is to develop a set of principles that…

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Abstract

Purpose

The authors show how organizations can best ensure that employees act in accordance with the corporation’s values. The key action is to develop a set of principles that amplify and fully define the values so leaders can communicate them more effectively. Principles that supply operational guidance help employees internalize the corporation’s values.

Design/methodology/approach

The article supports its conceptual approach with a case.

Findings

The case shows how principles helped one organization explicate the it’s values and turn them into a set of positively worded, unambiguous statements that guide employees in their daily work. When employees routinely apply the principles in their work, senior management can confidently delegate decision-making authority to the lowest appropriate level in the organization, having confidence that the outcomes of employee actions will be consistent with the organization’s vision, mission and strategic goals.

Practical implications

By describing the organization’s values in operational terms, the principles, taken together, provide each employee with a clear framework to use when making decisions.

Originality/value

The article shows senior leaders and boards that a key benefit of devolving power and using principles to guide employees’ actions is that it not only improves corporate performance in the short term, it also makes the firm more attractive to talented candidates for employment in the longer term.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 42 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Daniel O'Keefe

– The purpose of this paper is to provide commentary on Armstrong, Du, Green and Graefe’s (this issue) article.

1951

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide commentary on Armstrong, Du, Green and Graefe’s (this issue) article.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on reading and thinking about Armstrong et al.’s article.

Findings

One appealing way that advertising practice can be evidence-based is by applying dependable generalizations about what makes for effective ads. Armstrong et al.’s article offers data concerning the application of Armstrong’s persuasive advertising: Evidence-Based Principles (2010) persuasion principles. The article does not provide convincing evidence for the predictive validity of the principles, but it does offer a clear proof-of-concept demonstration of the feasibility of principles-based advertising assessment.

Originality/value

The paper’s value lies in its clarification of what claims Armstrong et al.’s data do and do not underwrite.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 50 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1990

Archie B. Carroll

This article describes how ethical principles canbe used in the decision‐making process. Itdescribes a survey conducted amongst a groupof managers and business students…

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Abstract

This article describes how ethical principles can be used in the decision‐making process. It describes a survey conducted amongst a group of managers and business students, who ranked a number of ethical principles in order of usefulness and applicability to their work. The notion of the “ethics screen”, composed of a number of ethical principles, is described. The article concludes that ethical principles are valuable only if there is a desire on the part of individual decision‐makers for them to be applied.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 28 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2015

Don Johnston

The purpose of this essay is to survey the ethical guidelines Red Cross personnel use to determine the appropriate course of action when faced with morally dilemmatic…

Abstract

The purpose of this essay is to survey the ethical guidelines Red Cross personnel use to determine the appropriate course of action when faced with morally dilemmatic situations, such as whether or not to accept private donations to fund humanitarian operations.

A review of the principles which buttress and guide all Red Cross action is presented along with two case studies – one in which the Solomon Islands Red Cross Society refused money from a controversial mining company, which could have been used to assist flood victims, and the other in which the Nigerian Red Cross Society accepted money from oil companies that have been historically ethically-challenged – which illustrate the necessity of contextual analysis in making these decisions.

The principles upon which all Red Cross actions are based – humanity, impartiality, neutrality, independence – provide the guidelines by which to evaluate whether or not to accept private, corporate donations. The Red Cross principles-based ethics allows for seemingly contradictory decisions to be reached in different countries and contexts, but in manners which are ethically coherent and transparent.

This paper sets the foundation for future research into what guides humanitarian organizations as they carry out their life-sustaining operations. Organizations which use such ethical principles to determine the appropriateness of their actions should benefit from transparently demonstrating this.

Case studies from recent disasters demonstrate the value of using ethical guidelines to evaluate donor suitability. This rigor and transparency benefits not only the Red Cross and other humanitarian organizations, but most importantly those rendered vulnerable by disaster around the world.

Details

Conscience, Leadership and the Problem of ‘Dirty Hands’
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-203-0

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 6 May 2003

Mary Jane Rootes

Robert Hauptman first raised awareness about the ethical issues of reference service in 1976. Hauptman, a library school student at the time, did a study on the…

Abstract

Robert Hauptman first raised awareness about the ethical issues of reference service in 1976. Hauptman, a library school student at the time, did a study on the culpability, or lack thereof, in reference service provided by librarians. In his study, Hauptman posed as a library patron seeking potentially dangerous information. The behavior examined was how librarians respond to the request for material on how to build a bomb that would be powerful enough to blow up a house. Hauptman tried to present himself as a person of questionable character. He used six public and seven academic libraries in this study. Hauptman first made sure that he was speaking to the reference librarian. He then requested information for the construction of a small explosive, requesting specifically the chemical properties of cordite. He then asked for information on the potency of such an explosive, whether or not it could blow up a suburban house (Hauptman, Wilson Library Bulletin, 1976, p. 626).

Details

Advances in Library Administration and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-206-1

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