Search results

1 – 10 of 954
Content available
Article
Publication date: 4 March 2014

Shubham Mehta, Alok Tyagi, Richa Tripathi and Mahesh Kumar

Epilepsy is a chronic neurological disorder that can have profound physical, social and psychological consequences. We aimed to assess the clinical predictors of quality…

Abstract

Epilepsy is a chronic neurological disorder that can have profound physical, social and psychological consequences. We aimed to assess the clinical predictors of quality of life of people with epilepsy. We recruited 31 patients suffering from epilepsy in this cross-sectional study. Their clinical profile was recorded. Quality Of Life in Epilepsy (QOLIE-31) was used to assess quality of life of our patients. Depression was screened by Neurological Disorders Depression Inventory in Epilepsy (NDDI-E). Among all the clinical variables, only seizure frequency significantly correlated with seizure worry (P=0.002), emotional well-being (P=0.026) and social functions (P=0.013) subscales of QOLIE-31. NDDIE score showed a significant negative correlation with all the subscales of QOLIE-31 except medication effects (P=0.993). A significant positive correlation was also noted between seizure frequency and NDDI-E score (r=0.417, P=0.020). Seizure frequency and depression are the most important predictors of quality of life in epilepsy patients. The management of patients with epilepsy should not only be aimed at just preventing seizures but the treating clinicians should also be cognizant about depression which itself can significantly affect the quality of life of patients.

Details

Mental Illness, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2036-7465

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 13 May 2021

Pawanrat Panjatharakul, Rutja Phuphaibul, Suporn Wongvatunyu and Anannit Visudtibhan

This descriptive correlational study describes behavior control by executive function (EF) and explores the relationship among age at seizure onset, duration of epilepsy

Abstract

Purpose

This descriptive correlational study describes behavior control by executive function (EF) and explores the relationship among age at seizure onset, duration of epilepsy, seizure frequency, number of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), family income, the caregiver's education, home environment and behavior control by EF in preschool children with epilepsy.

Design/methodology/approach

The purposive sample was 69 caregivers of preschool children with epilepsy. Data were collected in two medical centers in Bangkok from June 2019 to February 2020. The research instruments constituted: (1) a sociodemographic and medical information form for children with epilepsy and the caregiver; (2) early childhood-home observation for the measurement of the environment (EC-HOME) inventory and (3) the behavior rating inventory of executive function-preschool version® (BRIEF-P). The data were analyzed using Pearson's product-moment correlation and Spearman's Rho correlation.

Findings

Most of the participants had quite high scores on home environment (mean = 44.35) and mildly elevated levels of EF deficit (mean = 61.04). The duration of epilepsy and the number of AEDs were positively correlated with behavior control by EF. Family income was negatively associated with behavior control by EF. However, age at seizure onset, seizure frequency, the caregiver's education and home environment had no association with behavior control by EF.

Originality/value

Preschool children with epilepsy have poor behavioral control by EF. Consequently, healthcare providers should promote interventions in children to control seizures and to decrease the factors that impact the development of EF.

Details

Journal of Health Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0857-4421

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 17 October 2011

Sara Shostak and Miranda Waggoner

As the neurosciences endeavor to explain increasingly complex aspects of human biology and behavior, domains of human life that can only be assessed in social interaction…

Abstract

As the neurosciences endeavor to explain increasingly complex aspects of human biology and behavior, domains of human life that can only be assessed in social interaction become ever more important, if formally unacknowledged, dimensions of scientific research. Drawing on semi-structured interviews with 14 researchers who study epilepsy genetics, this chapter examines how neuroscientists encounter ‘the social.’ We find that at the beginning of their careers, researchers are intrigued by epilepsy as a disease of the brain and a means of exploring “the last frontier in medicine.” However, as they begin their investigations, the importance of building social relationships, gleaning the subtleties of seizure experience available only in patient narratives, and engaging with families in the field quickly emerge as important parts of epilepsy genetics research. Some researchers hope for and work toward a day when new techniques or models will allow them to forgo the time consuming, painstaking, and often invisible work of gathering detailed histories, combing through patient narratives, and traveling to field sites to meet with families. However, these accounts make clear that, at the current moment, much of “the molecular work” of epilepsy genetics research is built upon social interactions, relationships, and experiences.

Details

Sociological Reflections on the Neurosciences
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-881-6

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 14 December 2018

Michael Atkinson

To outline the experiential nature of hidden mental illnesses (or “invisible disabilities”) in sport and physical cultures. A sociological account is given of how people…

Abstract

Purpose

To outline the experiential nature of hidden mental illnesses (or “invisible disabilities”) in sport and physical cultures. A sociological account is given of how people living with a hidden mental illness or disorder manage their identities in physical culture.

Approach

The chapter begins by addressing the role of social stigma as a barrier to sport and exercise participation for young people living with hidden mental illnesses. From there, and venturing beyond typical sociological tropes about social stigma, the chapter presents ethnographic findings from a study of people living with epilepsy and their tactical uses of a range of physical cultures to craft their selves in innovative ways.

Findings

People living with so-called simple or nonmajor “hidden/invisible” disabilities are often overlooked as a differential needs population with sport and health zones. The people in this study identify how the desire to be mobile, self-expressive, and authentic through the physical activity pursuits is important yet unavailable to them in a wide range of sport, leisure, and health fields because of the ways in which these places privilege particular types of brain and bodies. Through their own self-styled physical cultural involvements, however, these people challenge the dominance of sport-based model of health promotion in broader culture and disrupt dominant ideological frames that privilege the normative, rational, calculating, and predictable brain in athletic zones.

Research Implications

The importance of identifying persons who may not participate in sport and physical culture due to perceived and felt stigma is highlighted. In addition, developing creative strategies and programs for these populations is underscored.

Details

Sport, Mental Illness, and Sociology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-469-1

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1986

Vicki Baker

Historically, epilepsy was attributed to non‐medical causes such as demonic possession, a gift from God, witchcraft, and mental illness. Only with the advent of the…

Abstract

Historically, epilepsy was attributed to non‐medical causes such as demonic possession, a gift from God, witchcraft, and mental illness. Only with the advent of the electroencephalogram (EEG) in the 1930s did the medical profession begin to document the neurological basis for the condition. Now a wide range of anticonvulsants allow most epileptics to maintain partial or total control over their seizures. Nevertheless, many epileptics routinely face discouraging social limitations, such as difficulty obtaining a driver's license, employment discrimination, problems with dating and marriage, restrictions on sports and activities, and the expense of medication.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 17 November 2011

Robert Winterhalder

The purpose of this paper is to review the application of a syndromic approach to seizure disorders in intellectual disabilities, in the light of recent advances in…

Downloads
267

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the application of a syndromic approach to seizure disorders in intellectual disabilities, in the light of recent advances in research and the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) Report on classification in 2010.

Design/methodology/approach

The ILAE Report is reviewed with an emphasis on neurodevelopmental seizure disorders, which may present to clinicians working in the field of adult intellectual disability. The advantages of applying a syndromic approach and the difficulties often encountered are also discussed.

Findings

Adopting a syndromic approach to seizure disorders in adults with intellectual disability should lead to rational prescribing, appropriate packages of care, and an improvement in the quality of research in this field.

Originality/value

This paper highlights the importance of identifying epilepsy syndromes in adults with intellectual disability, in the light of recent international reports on classification. It is of value to clinicians (particularly psychiatrists and learning disability nurses) practising in the field of epilepsy and intellectual disability.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 5 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 20 April 2009

Malcolm Fisk

This paper examines, by reference to a telecare service evaluation in the Republic of Ireland, the role and potential of bed epilepsy sensors. It points to benefits for…

Downloads
109

Abstract

This paper examines, by reference to a telecare service evaluation in the Republic of Ireland, the role and potential of bed epilepsy sensors. It points to benefits for both users and carers that arise from the sensors both enabling speedy responses in the event of a seizure, and in their providing reassurance and a better quality of life for both parties.

Details

Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 7 January 2019

Samuel R. Hodge and Eugene Asola

This chapter is structured for teaching young learners with other health impairments in special education. Under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement…

Abstract

This chapter is structured for teaching young learners with other health impairments in special education. Under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEA, 2004), other health impairments represent chronic or acute health problems such as asthma, attention deficit disorder or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), diabetes, epilepsy, a heart condition, hemophilia, lead poisoning, leukemia, nephritis, rheumatic fever, and sickle cell anemia and adversely affect a child’s educational performance. The chapter is organized around definitions, prevalence, etiologies, intervention strategies, and teaching considerations for selected disabling conditions in this disability category.

Details

Special Education for Young Learners with Disabilities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-041-3

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 1999

SooY. lhm

Downloads
58

Abstract

Details

Electronic Resources Review, vol. 3 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1364-5137

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 January 2012

Sharada Deepak, Elizabeth Obe and Rajnish Attavar

The purpose of this paper is to ascertain the training status of staff in care homes for people with intellectual disabilities managed by the non‐health sector in High…

Downloads
240

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to ascertain the training status of staff in care homes for people with intellectual disabilities managed by the non‐health sector in High Wycombe, with regard to administering emergency antiepileptic medication and to identify training needs.

Design/methodology/approach

Management of seizures in people with intellectual disabilities and epilepsy comes with its challenges. Although there are clear guidelines for the same, implementing them in the community, especially in the non‐health sector setting, raises the issue of training staff in the administration of emergency antiepileptic medication. A survey was undertaken in response to the varying staff training needs. A short semi‐structured questionnaire was designed and administered over the telephone to the managers of these care homes.

Findings

Less than half of the care homes had staff trained to administer emergency antiepileptic medication. The commonest reason cited was their policy of admitting only patients with well controlled seizures. This paper identified the need for staff training and raising awareness amongst relevant healthcare professionals.

Practical implications

The survey highlights the practical difficulties arising in the implementation of national and trust level healthcare policies in the community.

Originality/value

This paper is of value to clinicians working with people with intellectual disabilities and epilepsy, GPs, and staff and management in the care homes in the health and non‐health sectors. It raises questions around delineation of responsibility and communication between various professionals in various levels of care involved in managing people with intellectual disabilities and epilepsy to ensure provision of safe and effective care for this population.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

1 – 10 of 954