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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Alan Walker and Kristiina Martimo

This article focuses on researching quality of life in old age. Based on a review of the relevant literature, it argues that research has not reflected sufficiently the…

Abstract

This article focuses on researching quality of life in old age. Based on a review of the relevant literature, it argues that research has not reflected sufficiently the multifaceted nature of quality of life and has relied too much on the judgements of professionals rather than older people. It concludes that quality of life research in general has under‐emphasised the importance of material factors in people's lives. With regard to older people, research shows that relatively poor quality of life, as reported by older people themselves, is associated with only a minority and, among this minority, twice the proportion of older women to men. The article ends with an outline of the new Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) Growing Older Research Programme on Extending Quality Life, which in three years time promises to provide usable information for policy makers and practitioners about the determinants of quality of life in old age.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Christopher McKevitt and Charles Wolfe

Although ‘quality of life’ is thought to be an important concept in healthcare, there is a lack of agreement about what this term means. This paper arises from a study…

Abstract

Although ‘quality of life’ is thought to be an important concept in healthcare, there is a lack of agreement about what this term means. This paper arises from a study which made the idea of quality of life itself the object of enquiry. We report findings from qualitative interviews with 47 healthcare professionals working with stroke and elderly care patients, which sought their views of the meaning and uses of quality of life. Most defined quality of life in terms of happiness/life satisfaction. Poor health and disability were assumed to reduce quality of life; interviewees represented their work as aiming to improve patient quality of life through improving health. Most regarded formal quality of life measurement as a research tool but not feasible or appropriate in routine care. However, conversations and observations of patients and carers were represented as informal ways of judging patient quality of life, and were generally regarded as a useful or essential part of the therapeutic relationship. Such assessments were said to take place routinely and to provide opportunities for patients/carers to express their wishes, and for ‘real’ patient needs to be identified. This runs counter to evidence of low levels of patient/carer participation in decision‐making and discharge. The real value of the quality of life concept remains unproven but we suggest that in the context of our interviews it was used by professionals to reflect on the nature of the therapeutic encounter and to articulate ideas about healthcare practice.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2009

Helen Beck

The purpose of this paper is to present how high quality public spaces contribute positively to people's quality of life. However, sources of credible evidence in support…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present how high quality public spaces contribute positively to people's quality of life. However, sources of credible evidence in support of this statement are surprisingly scarce. One impact is that it can be frustratingly difficult to quantify links between investment in the public realm and improvements to people's quality of life.

Design/methodology/approach

CABE Space, the government's national advisor on well‐designed, planned and maintained urban public spaces, fund a scoping study which seeks to determine and understand useful correlative relationships between existing data on quality of life and existing data on the quality of public space. The researchers analyse a total of 34 national datasets to ascertain what they can tell us about how the quality of public spaces affects people's quality of life.

Findings

Numerous small scale research studies have examined the benefits of high quality public spaces in terms of their economic, social and environmental value. However, a national evidence base to inform policy agendas relating to well‐being and liveability is lacking.

Research limitations/implications

Better understanding is needed to maximise the benefits of provision for individuals and the areas that they live in, especially because the poorest areas suffer from the poorest quality of environments.

Originality/value

Linking the quality of public spaces and the quality of life is a complex and multifaceted area that suffers from a meagre evidence base. This research aims to further this area of research and is original in its national scale of analysis.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

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Article
Publication date: 12 August 2020

Siti Raba’ah Hamzah, Siti Nur Syuhada Musa, Zulaiha Muda and Maimunah Ismail

This study aims at investigating the relationship between the quality of working life and career engagement of cancer survivors and the mediating role of the effect of

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims at investigating the relationship between the quality of working life and career engagement of cancer survivors and the mediating role of the effect of disease and treatment.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional study was conducted on 400 cancer survivors in Malaysia. The participants, aged between 18 and 40, were Malaysian citizens undergoing follow-up sessions at the Kuala Lumpur General Hospital and the National Cancer Institute of Malaysia. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics, Pearson’s correlation coefficient and regression analysis that implemented Baron and Kenny’s method for mediation were used for analyses.

Findings

The effect of treatment and disease was found to significantly mediate the relationship between quality of work-life and career engagement of cancer survivors.

Research limitations/implications

The instrument for this study was a self-reported questionnaire, with participants responding to specific items on a five-point Likert scale under the supervision of the researchers. As results from the survey were subjective in nature, the bias in the participants could not be eliminated completely. This study was also limited to the two main parameters, namely, quality of working life and career engagement and a mediator, namely, effects of the disease and treatment. Moreover, as the survey was conducted in only two hospitals in the Klang Valley area, the results cannot be generalized to other cancer survivors in other regions of Malaysia.

Practical implications

The results of this study indicated that the mediating role of the effects of disease and treatment on the relationship of the quality of working life subscales with career engagement. Practical implications, cancer survivor consciousness of the effects of disease and treatment is very important and should be addressed and could be notable to improve the quality of working life.

Originality/value

This study gives valuable insight to managers and practitioners by investigating the relationship between the quality of working life and career engagement and mediates by the effects of disease and treatment. The findings highlight the challenges cancer survivors face on their return to working life. The findings also highlight the need for management to take steps to help cancer survivors cope with career engagement for better work performance.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Article
Publication date: 21 May 2020

Bojan Grum and Darja Kobal Grum

There is a lack of theoretical and empirical studies regarding concepts of social sustainability based on social infrastructure. The idea of understanding this paper is…

Abstract

Purpose

There is a lack of theoretical and empirical studies regarding concepts of social sustainability based on social infrastructure. The idea of understanding this paper is that quality social infrastructure leads to the general quality of people’s life in the built environment and that is rounded up to social sustainability. This paper aims to integrate these concepts into the network, hereinafter referred to as a social sustainability model.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology used in this paper is desk research. The authors follow methodological steps in the building of conceptual network: setting up a research problem; choice of databases; reviewing the literature and categorizing the selected data; identifying and default conceptual definition; integrating the concepts; synthesis and making it all make sense; and assembly and validating the concept. Through that, a large volume of bibliographic materials was scanned, and a limited number of documents have been reviewed and critiqued. The documents have been selected from varied disciplines, including social infrastructure, quality of life, social sustainability, urban sociology, housing policy as among the articles.

Findings

The result is the model which represents the links between social infrastructure (utility equipment, public infrastructure, vital objects and fundamentals) and further between factors inside quality of life structure (users, quality of life, reflections). The result is the model which representing the links between social infrastructure (utility equipment, public infrastructure, vital objects and fundamentals) and further between factors inside well-being structure (users, quality of life, reflections).

Research limitations/implications

There is a potential risk of errors arising from the use of assumptions, limited desk reviews and data from secondary resources.

Originality/value

The authors portray the development of social sustainability model. Within this model, the authors can critically observe all levels within the existing built environment: user responses to the built environment, their satisfaction, social inclusion, health, etc. Within this model, they can observe the links between existing research, their frequency, capture, direction and not least to determine which areas have not been explored and where the lacks of research are. The conclusion outlines the framework and its main concepts of social sustainability based on social infrastructure and well-being, including their theoretical premises and components.

Details

Facilities , vol. 38 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 4 March 2014

Shubham Mehta, Alok Tyagi, Richa Tripathi and Mahesh Kumar

Epilepsy is a chronic neurological disorder that can have profound physical, social and psychological consequences. We aimed to assess the clinical predictors of quality of

Abstract

Epilepsy is a chronic neurological disorder that can have profound physical, social and psychological consequences. We aimed to assess the clinical predictors of quality of life of people with epilepsy. We recruited 31 patients suffering from epilepsy in this cross-sectional study. Their clinical profile was recorded. Quality Of Life in Epilepsy (QOLIE-31) was used to assess quality of life of our patients. Depression was screened by Neurological Disorders Depression Inventory in Epilepsy (NDDI-E). Among all the clinical variables, only seizure frequency significantly correlated with seizure worry (P=0.002), emotional well-being (P=0.026) and social functions (P=0.013) subscales of QOLIE-31. NDDIE score showed a significant negative correlation with all the subscales of QOLIE-31 except medication effects (P=0.993). A significant positive correlation was also noted between seizure frequency and NDDI-E score (r=0.417, P=0.020). Seizure frequency and depression are the most important predictors of quality of life in epilepsy patients. The management of patients with epilepsy should not only be aimed at just preventing seizures but the treating clinicians should also be cognizant about depression which itself can significantly affect the quality of life of patients.

Details

Mental Illness, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2036-7465

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Lim Lan Yuan

The teaching of subjects such as quality of life and sustainable development presents tremendous challenges because of the nebulous and multifaceted nature of the subject…

Abstract

The teaching of subjects such as quality of life and sustainable development presents tremendous challenges because of the nebulous and multifaceted nature of the subject matter. An important advantage of the case‐study approach to teaching is its capacity for understanding complexity in particular contexts. The purpose of this article is to examine quality of life and the use of its case studies for teaching and learning. It will discuss some issues on quality of life research and their difficulties in definition and evaluation, illustrated with actual case studies.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 26 January 2010

Samsinar Md‐Sidin, Murali Sambasivan and Izhairi Ismail

The main purpose of this study is to link work‐family conflict, quality of work and non‐work lives, quality of life and social support (supervisor and spouse supports)…

Abstract

Purpose

The main purpose of this study is to link work‐family conflict, quality of work and non‐work lives, quality of life and social support (supervisor and spouse supports). Specifically, it seeks to address three different roles of social support that have theoretical and empirical support and the mediating roles of quality of work life and quality of non‐work life.

Design/methodology/approach

The SEM‐based approach has been used to study supervisor and spouse supports as moderators between work‐family conflict and quality of life; independent variables of work‐family conflict; independent variables of quality of life. The study has been carried out in Malaysia.

Findings

The main findings are: work‐family conflict has relationship with quality of life; quality of work life and non‐work life are “partial” mediators between work‐family conflict and quality of life; and, among the various roles of social support, its role as an independent variable of quality of life gives the best results.

Research limitations/implications

The research is based on a cross‐sectional study conducted in Malaysia and addresses only the spouse and supervisor supports as components of social support.

Originality/value

The research has developed a comprehensive model linking work‐family conflict, quality of work and non‐work lives, and quality of life and has studied the role of social support.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 11 March 2019

Nguyen Dinh Tho

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of the hardiness of university business students. Overall hardiness, and its individual components of commitment…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of the hardiness of university business students. Overall hardiness, and its individual components of commitment, control and challenge, were all explored in relation to students’ quality of university life, quality of life and learning performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 722 Vietnamese business students was surveyed to collect the data. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to determine whether hardiness and/or its components enhanced students’ quality of university life, quality of life and learning performance. Necessary condition analysis (NCA) was then employed to explore the levels of hardiness and its components necessary for each of the key areas.

Findings

SEM results revealed that overall hardiness had a positive effect on all three key areas. In terms of individual components, commitment, control and challenge were found to have positive impacts on learning performance; however, control did not affect quality of university life, and challenge had no effect on quality of life. NCA results show that these components of hardiness had varying degrees necessary for students to experience success in these areas.

Practical implications

Findings suggest that university administers should consider the role which student hardiness, and its individual components, can play in relation to student success at university. Specifically, universities should practice hardiness training and assessment programs to equip their students with hardy attitudes and skills.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to examine of the levels of the components of hardiness (i.e. commitment, control and challenge) necessary for students to achieve success in the quality of university life, quality of life and learning performance.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 61 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 5 April 2013

Roland K. Yeo and Jessica Li

– The aim of this paper is to explore how employees make sense of their work context and its influence on their learning orientation to improve their quality of work life.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to explore how employees make sense of their work context and its influence on their learning orientation to improve their quality of work life.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative data drawn from a dynamic online discussion that spanned three years were used in the content analysis. A total of 137 MBA participants from a university in the southwest of the USA contributed to the online forum.

Findings

Perception of work-life context influences the cognitive intent of employees in such a way that they change their learning orientation and develop learning strategies to improve their current work conditions. These strategies are in turn influenced by their sensemaking of the context to determine their quality of work life.

Research limitations/implications

The study illuminates the relationship between learning and context through the theoretical perspective of sensemaking. It extends the concept of learning orientation as operating at the individual and group levels other than the organizational level.

Practical implications

Organizational leaders and human resource development (HRD) professionals will recognize how certain contextual stimuli can trigger their employees ' readiness to learn and improve their work life. They can direct their employees ' learning orientation through job redesign and job enrichment.

Originality/value

The study provides a learning context to quality of work life, an area that has not been extensively researched in the HRD literature. By exploring sensemaking of quality of work life in the context of learning, the paper offers a more encompassing perspective of learning orientation and quality of work life contexts.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

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