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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2023

Honglei Lia Sun and Pnina Fichman

This study aims to explore the evolutionary pattern of discussion topics over time in an online depression self-help community.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the evolutionary pattern of discussion topics over time in an online depression self-help community.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) method, the authors analyzed 17,534 posts and 138,567 comments posted over 8 years on an online depression self-help group in China and identified the major discussion topics. Based on significant changes in the frequency of posts over time, the authors identified five stages of development. Through a comparative analysis of discussion topics in the five stages, the authors identified the changes in the extent and range of topics over time. The authors discuss the influence of socio-cultural factors on depressed individuals' health information behavior.

Findings

The results illustrate an evolutionary pattern of topics in users' discussion in the online depression self-help group, including five distinct stages with a sequence of topic changes. The discussion topics of the group included self-reflection, daily record, peer diagnosis, companionship support and instrumental support. While some prominent topics were discussed frequently in each stage, some topics were short-lived.

Originality/value

While most prior research has ignored topic changes over time, the study takes an evolutionary perspective of online discussion topics among depressed individuals. The authors provide a nuanced account of the progression of topics through five distinct stages, showing that the community experienced a sequence of changes as it developed. Identifying this evolutionary pattern extends the scope of research on depression therapy in China and offers a deeper understanding of the support that individuals with depression seek, receive and provide online.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 February 2023

Wenlong Zhu, Jian Mou, Morad Benyoucef, Jongki Kim, Taeho Hong and Sihua Chen

This paper analyzes the existing body of work on the relationship between depression and social media use in the information system field, including the impact of social…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper analyzes the existing body of work on the relationship between depression and social media use in the information system field, including the impact of social media use on depression, the effect of depression on social media use and the association and interaction between depression and social media use.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the systematic review method, this study selected the Web of Science, Emerald, Science Direct, JSTOR, Wiley Online Library and Taylor and Francis Online as search databases and ended up with 29 papers that met all the authors' requirements.

Findings

This study identified five possible reasons for the inconsistencies between the findings of the selected studies. First, uses and gratifications theory has different influence mechanisms in evaluating the relationship between social media use and depression. Second, gender can moderate the impact of social media use on depression. Third, age moderates the association between social media use and depression. Fourth, for adolescents, the time spent on social media has a critical effect on their depression. Fifth, negative personality traits (e.g. rumination, envy, etc.) can play a significant role in mediating the relationship between passive social media use and depression.

Originality/value

This study conducted an evaluation of the relationship between depression and social media use. First, the authors summarized the research framework and main body of work covering the relationship between depression and social media use. Second, the authors proposed possible explanations for the inconsistencies between the findings. Third, the authors discussed and explained the possible influence mechanisms of the existing results.

Peer review

The peer review history for this article is available at: https://publons.com/publon/10.1108/OIR-04-2021-0211.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 18 May 2016

Cosme Alvarado-Esquivel, Antonio Sifuentes-Alvarez and Carlos Salas-Martinez

We sought to evaluate the capacity of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) in discriminating mental disorders other than depression in pregnant women in…

Abstract

We sought to evaluate the capacity of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) in discriminating mental disorders other than depression in pregnant women in northern Mexico. Three hundred pregnant women attending prenatal consultations in a public hospital in Durango City, Mexico submitted a validated EPDS and were examined for mental disorders other than depression using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders - 4th Ed. (DSM-IV) criteria. Sensitivity and specificity of cut-off points of the EPDS, and positive and negative predictive values were calculated. Of the 300 pregnant women studied, 21 had mental disorders other than depression by the DSM-IV criteria. The best EPDS score for screening mental disorders other than depression was 8/9. This threshold showed a sensitivity of 52.4%, a specificity of 67.0%, a positive predictive value of 11.5%, a negative predictive value of 95.4%, and an area under the curve of 0.643 (95% confidence interval: 0.52-0.76). The EPDS can be considered for screening mental disorders other than depression in Mexican pregnant women whenever a cut-off score of 8/9 is used. However, the tool showed small power to separate pregnant women with and without mental disorders other than depression.

Details

Mental Illness, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2036-7465

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Sue Holttum

The purpose of this paper is to discuss two recent studies on depression in members of ethnic minorities, one based in the UK with older people, and one in the USA. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss two recent studies on depression in members of ethnic minorities, one based in the UK with older people, and one in the USA. The aim was to examine what might lead to depression in these groups, and what might protect people from it.

Design/methodology/approach

The UK-based study examined depression and physical health in older members of the two largest ethnic minority groups in the UK: African Caribbean and South Asian. The US-based study examined whether a sense of belonging to the population group African Americans protected people from depression, as one social theory might predict, or whether racism prevented this protection, as predicted by another theory.

Findings

In London-based older South Asians, depression was explained by their poorer physical health compared to white Europeans. In older people of black Caribbean origin, depression was linked to their social disadvantage. The researchers did not measure people’s experience of discrimination, and other research suggests this can explain both physical illness and depression. The US-based study reported better well-being for people who identified with other African Americans, but not if they also felt negative about African Americans. However, these were weak links, so other things may affect well-being more, such as day-to-day relationships and a range of group memberships.

Originality/value

The London-based study was new in studying depression in older people belonging to the two largest ethnic minority groups in the UK and in white Europeans. The US study tested two competing social theories with different predictions about depression in relation to belonging to an ethnic minority. Both studies highlight the need for more research on discrimination and how to reduce it and its negative effects on both mental and physical health.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 December 2022

Ali Al-kassab-Córdova, Claudia Silva-Perez, Andres Quevedo-Ramirez, Marco Gonzalo Mendoza Lugo, Jonathan Azcarruz-Asencios, Giancarlo Castañeda-Montenegro, Sergio Bravo-Cucci and Jorge L. Maguina

Depression has become a major health concern, particularly in developing countries. This disorder is highly prevalent among certain vulnerable populations, such as…

Abstract

Purpose

Depression has become a major health concern, particularly in developing countries. This disorder is highly prevalent among certain vulnerable populations, such as prisoners. In Peru, prisons are overcrowded, and the health of prisoners is neglected. Thus, this study aims to estimate the prevalence of depression diagnosed during incarceration in male inmates from all Peruvian prisons and assess its associated factors.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional study was conducted based on the secondary data analysis of the National Census of Prison Population 2016 in Peru. This study included records of prisoners who reported whether they were diagnosed with depression by a health-care professional after admission into the prisons. Descriptive, bivariate and multivariable analyses were performed.

Findings

Of the 63,312 prisoners included in this study, 1,007 reported an in-prison diagnosis of depression by a health-care professional, which represents a prevalence of 1.59%. Substance use disorder (adjusted prevalence ratio [aPR] 3.10; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.91–5.03), hypertension (aPR 7.20; 95% CI: 6.28–8.24) and previous discrimination (aPR 1.97; 95% CI: 1.62–2.40) were strongly associated with depression, even when adjusting for multiple confounders. Other directly associated variables were, for example, violence during childhood, infrequent visits in prison and diabetes.

Originality/value

The right of prisoners to adequate health care is being neglected in Peru. Mental health is a cornerstone of health quality. Acknowledging which factors are associated with depression in prison is important to implement strategies to improve the mental health of prisoners.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Mad Muse: The Mental Illness Memoir in a Writer's Life and Work
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-810-0

Book part
Publication date: 28 December 2006

Sarah McCue Horwitz, Julia Bell and Rebecca Grusky

Depression is a prevalent, debilitating condition that will replace cancer as the second leading cause of morbidity within the next decade and, according to the Global…

Abstract

Depression is a prevalent, debilitating condition that will replace cancer as the second leading cause of morbidity within the next decade and, according to the Global Burden of Disease Study, ranks number one in disability-adjusted life years for females 5 years and older worldwide (Blehar & Oren, 1997; Murray & Lopez, 1996). Depression in the workplace has been linked to increased absenteeism and productivity loss, is equal to the costs of diabetes and hypertension, and these costs are almost equal to the direct costs of depression treatment (Kessler et al., 1999; Marlowe, 2002; Druss, Rosenheck, & Sledge, 2000; Elinson, Houck, Marcus, & Pincus, 2004). A national study of individuals 15–54 years documented a lifetime prevalence of 17.1% and found that depression was more common in females, young adults, and those with less education (Blazer, Kessler, McGonagle, & Swartz, 1994; Kessler, McGonagle, Swartz, Blazer, & Nelson, 1993; Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 2000; Kessler et al., 1994a, 1994b; Bebbington et al., 2003).

Details

Research on Community-Based Mental Health Services for Children and Adolescents
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-416-4

Book part
Publication date: 13 October 2014

Tetsushi Fujimoto, Sayaka K. Shinohara and Tsuyoshi Oohira

This study examines the impact of work-to-family conflict (WFC) on depression for employed husbands and wives in Japan, the moderating role of own psychological family…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the impact of work-to-family conflict (WFC) on depression for employed husbands and wives in Japan, the moderating role of own psychological family involvement in the relationship between WFC and depression, and the moderating role of spouses’ family and job involvement in the relationship between WFC and depression.

Methodology/approach

We use a matched sample of Japanese employed husbands and wives to examine the relationships between inter-spousal dynamics about work–family conflict and psychological well-being.

Findings

We found that (1) the effect of WFC on depression was larger for wives, (2) husbands’ and wives’ own psychological family involvement did not moderate the relationship between WFC and their depression, and (3) spousal family and job involvement operated as a moderator only for husbands. While WFC reduced husbands’ depression when their wives were highly involved in their jobs psychologically and behaviorally, WFC increased husbands’ depression when their wives were highly involved in family at both psychological and behavioral levels.

Practical implications

Employers need to take into account the importance of looking simultaneously at the ways employed husbands and wives work when trying to understand how workplace conditions may be changed to ameliorate psychological well-being for spouses.

Originality/value of chapter

This study suggests that an experience of conflict between work and family is likely to deteriorate the psychological well-being for employed husbands and wives in non-Western contexts like Japan. Furthermore, spousal involvements in family and work domains are likely to play moderating roles in the relationship between WFC and depression.

Details

Family Relationships and Familial Responses to Health Issues
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-015-5

Keywords

Open Access
Book part
Publication date: 4 May 2018

Yuziani and Meutia Maulina

Purpose – The objective of this research is to know the correlation of stress level with the degree of depression in the elderly at a nursing home in Lhokseumawe in the…

Abstract

Purpose – The objective of this research is to know the correlation of stress level with the degree of depression in the elderly at a nursing home in Lhokseumawe in the year 2017.

Design/Methodology/Approach – This research is analytic using a cross-sectional approach with a total sampling method. The total number of samples was 55 respondents.

Findings – The results showed that the elderly in a Lhokseumawe nursing home at average are at mild stress level to medium degree of depression. Pearson correlation test results show that there is a correlation between stress level and degree of depression in elderly in the Lhokseumawe nursing home in 2017 with medium strong relationship (r = 0.406; p = 0.002).

Research Limitations/Implications – We expect that the elderly living in the orphanage avoid negative thinking about themselves and the future, eliminating feelings of guilt or regret about past mistakes, taking adequate rest and maintaining a diet to avoid stress so as to prevent the onset of depression.

Originality/Value – In addition the study increases the theoretical understanding of the correlation between stress level and degree of depression in elderly at nursing home.

Details

Proceedings of MICoMS 2017
Type: Book
ISBN:

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 October 2022

Fatemeh Khozaei, Claus-Christian Carbon and Nordin Abd Razak

Afghan migrants are at an increased risk of mental disorders due to various political, economic and security-associated stressors. COVID-19 has brought extra concerns for…

Abstract

Purpose

Afghan migrants are at an increased risk of mental disorders due to various political, economic and security-associated stressors. COVID-19 has brought extra concerns for this group of migrants around the world. Few studies have examined how the perception of the host society and perceived stress are associated with the mental health of migrants during the COVD-19 pandemic. This study aims to examine the role of perceived justice, freedom and the burden of COVID-19 on experienced stress and depression among Afghan migrants in Iran.

Design/methodology/approach

N = 497 participants representing the Afghan migrant community between 15 and 80 years old participated in the study. The target population was recruited from Afghan migrants residing in Kerman city in Iran, the capital of one of the provinces with the highest number of Afghan migrants in Iran. The participants answered questions on depression, positive mental health and a series of stressors such as perceived justice, freedom and the burden of COVID-19. Data was collected in November and December 2021 during the third wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in Iran.

Findings

The authors found a significant effect of the burden of the COVID-19 pandemic on migrants’ perceived stress and depression. On the other hand, perceptions of justice and freedom in the host country can significantly reduce stress and depression. The results show that stress mediates the effect of justice, freedom and the burden of COVID-19 on depression. In addition, positive mental health moderates the impact of stress on depression.

Originality/value

The current study is one of the pioneering studies that examines the determinants of Afghan migrants’ mental disorders during the COVID-19 pandemic in Iran.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

Keywords

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