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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2016

Stefanie Csida and Claudia Mewald

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the teacher and pupil learning progress through the first implementation of a computer-based method called PrimarWebQuest in a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the teacher and pupil learning progress through the first implementation of a computer-based method called PrimarWebQuest in a primary school classroom. The study aimed at identifying cognitive and metacognitive skills that are needed to work successfully with the platform. To do so, this lesson study (LS) investigated the pupils’ strategy acquisition and analysed their autonomy and knowledge growth making use of observation, collaborative reflection, questionnaires, content analysis and triangulation. Additionally, the teacher’s development of methodological skills in the use of the strategy was investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

A LS was carried out in an urban primary school in Lower Austria over a period of four weeks. Based on an experiment carried out during two project days, the learning and the pupils’ strategy use as regards their autonomy and self-direction were observed and their knowledge growth was analysed making use of pre-and post-tests. Moreover, questionnaires and post-lesson interviews were implemented to verify insights gained from observation and post-lesson discussions in the teacher research group, which consisted of the main investigating teacher, the two class teachers and an external expert.

Findings

The study suggests that the pupils’ learning outcomes and self-direction improved through teaching with PrimarWebQuests and also after implementing the refined lesson plan. The results demonstrate the value of learning through new media and emphasise the importance of giving precise instructions as well as the need for careful guidance through the teacher in autonomous learning scenarios including new media.

Originality/value

The findings of the study provide a deeper understanding of and guidelines for planning and implementing computer-based lessons with PrimarWebQuests, which may be useful for teachers and curriculum designers.

Details

International Journal for Lesson and Learning Studies, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-8253

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Book part
Publication date: 22 May 2013

Mary Shea and Rosemary Murray

Purpose – To provide teachers with an outline of characteristics typically associated with young adolescent students and the nature of effective teaching and learning…

Abstract

Purpose – To provide teachers with an outline of characteristics typically associated with young adolescent students and the nature of effective teaching and learning opportunities appropriate at this distinct level of human growth and development.Design/methodology/approach – The chapter presents concepts associated with differentiated instruction and authentic learning activities; both are examined as central when exploring ways to close the learning gap between students of poverty and their more advantaged peers.Findings – The goals of establishing effective pedagogy and closing demographic achievement gaps based on test scores must be addressed in parallel since closing the latter without addressing the first does not produce lasting effects.Research limitations/implications – The authors present a sampling of researchers’ findings related to effective pedagogy for adolescent learners; these include conclusions on differentiated instruction, developmentally appropriate curriculum, technological literacy, inquiry, project-based, and expeditionary learning.Practical implications – Factors that make particular middle schools in a large urban area effective are examined as well as each school’s partnership connection with a college literacy program.Originality/value of chapter – Teachers’ adherence to research-tested methodologies appropriate for adolescent learners requires knowledge of valid, reliable sources, and successful models of implementation.

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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2019

Victoria Lynn Lowell and James Michael Morris Jr

The purpose of this paper is to discuss potential challenges learners from different generations may have with current instructional methods using educational technologies…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss potential challenges learners from different generations may have with current instructional methods using educational technologies in the classroom. The authors hope to create awareness to help improve equity in learning opportunities and assist educators in understanding the needs of multigenerational classrooms.

Design/methodology/approach

In a narrative review of the literature, the authors present the current findings of the literature on generations in higher education and concerns for equity in learning opportunities.

Findings

It is commonplace in undergraduate programs for learners of multiple generations to attend classes together and research has shown that historical context and generational experiences affect the values, attitudes and learning preferences of each generation. Therefore, higher education institutions should be aware of the demographic profile of their students, as well as the external populations from which they may recruit students, to ensure they are cognizant of the needs of these populations and can provide equality in learning opportunities.

Practical implications

To assist with the needs of this changing student population, university leaders must consider generational characteristics to ensure equity in learning opportunity. Specifically, university leaders and educators in the classrooms will need to adapt and adjust for a changing student population providing instruction that meets the needs of multiple generations of learners, often within one classroom.

Originality/value

Often when we think of diversity in the classroom we think of age, gender, race or even culture. Today we must add diversity in generations. Unlike other equity issues in education such as access (McLaughlin, 2010), educators may not be considering the equity in the design of their instruction to provide equitable learning experiences based on a learners’ knowledge and skills established by their experiences with technology. The lack of knowledge and skills a learner has with technology based on their experiences may create barriers to their ability to understand and complete instructional content involving technology (Wager, 2005). To ensure all learners can be successful, educators should strive to provide equality in learning opportunities when designing instruction including technology.

Details

The International Journal of Information and Learning Technology, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4880

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2018

Clare Elizabeth Gartland and Christine Smith

Vocational courses in England support the progression to higher education (HE) of large numbers of young people from disadvantaged backgrounds, yet there is little…

Abstract

Purpose

Vocational courses in England support the progression to higher education (HE) of large numbers of young people from disadvantaged backgrounds, yet there is little research exploring the college experiences of these young people prior to entering university. The purpose of this paper is to consider the experiences of young people on Level 3 Business and Technology Education Council (BTEC) vocational courses in their progression to HE from differently positioned post-16 colleges in England.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative study was undertaken into the experiences of students on BTEC courses in four subject clusters (science, technology, engineering and maths, arts and humanities, social sciences and health) at both a Further Education College and a Sixth Form College in an area of multiple deprivation and low HE participation. Young people’s experiences of BTEC courses and the support and guidance they receive are explored through the conceptual lens of “possible selves” and using Bourdieu’s ideas of capital, habitus and field.

Findings

Pedagogies and practices on BTEC courses are found to support the development of relevant social and cultural capital and help young people formulate well-articulated “possible selves” as university students, even amongst students who previously had not considered university as an option. The findings illustrate how differently positioned colleges support students’ progression and identify challenges presented by an increasingly stratified and marketised system.

Originality/value

The study highlights the transformative potential of BTEC courses and their role in supporting progression to HE amongst young people from economically disadvantaged backgrounds. The current emphasis on standardisation and rigour as mechanisms to better equip students for HE neglects the unique contribution BTEC pedagogies and practices make to encouraging HE participation. A Bourdieusian and “possible selves” theoretical framework has provided new insights into these valuable learning processes.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 60 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1998

Donal Carroll

Suggests a particular practice should be developed when dealing with difficult adult learners. This involves changing the purpose of conventional “tutorials” to “learning…

Abstract

Suggests a particular practice should be developed when dealing with difficult adult learners. This involves changing the purpose of conventional “tutorials” to “learning clinics”. These would be one‐to‐one, in order to diagnose learning needs, and embed a learning culture designed to develop critical, independent learners. Critical practice in this forum is suggested through evaluating a number of verbatim learner/teacher exchanges including role and behaviour of teacher, use and purpose of language used, and how decisions are made. Suggests a critical framework based on adult learning theories. Includes particularly, the role of experience, as potential barrier as well as resource.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2018

Karen Bordonaro

The purpose of this paper is to offer practicing academic librarians an overview of adult education theories as a way to more deeply understand and further foster adult…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to offer practicing academic librarians an overview of adult education theories as a way to more deeply understand and further foster adult learning in academic libraries.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a literature review.

Findings

This review introduces academic librarians to a range of specific adult education learning theories; it offers examples of academic library users engaging in these types of adult learning; it considers how academic libraries can further foster adult learning; and it identifies major characteristics of adult learners.

Originality/value

This literature review offers a summative overview of adult education in a way that has not appeared in the library literature to date, along with explicit connections between adult education theories and academic library practices.

Details

Information and Learning Science, vol. 119 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

Harry Gray

Abstract

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Book part
Publication date: 13 January 2011

Joseph Rene Corbeil and Maria Elena Corbeil

Social networking tools, like Twitter, are beginning to demonstrate their potential as powerful communication and collaboration tools in social, political, and educational…

Abstract

Social networking tools, like Twitter, are beginning to demonstrate their potential as powerful communication and collaboration tools in social, political, and educational arenas. As smart phones and mobile computing devices become less expensive and more powerful, they will also become more pervasive. As a matter of economics, institutions will need to adapt to learning experiences that can occur in a wide range of contexts and over multiple channels. Having more technologically adept learners will also compel educators to develop innovative ways to promote students’ active learning and equitable participation in class discussions. Given the increased popularity and exponential growth of Twitter, educators have begun to experiment with it to determine its potential for communication and collaboration, both in and out of the classroom. Through a brief description and history of microblogging and the emergence of Twitter, examples of how instructors are integrating microblogs into their courses, and an overview of a social networking cooperative project case study, this chapter tells the story of how the authors’ use of microblogs evolved from purely recreational to authentic instructional uses for their online classes.

Details

Educating Educators with Social Media
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-649-3

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Article
Publication date: 6 April 2012

Alan Montague

The purpose of this paper is to outline a process to assist adult learners and researchers to capture, streamline and retrieve data for the analysis of content from…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to outline a process to assist adult learners and researchers to capture, streamline and retrieve data for the analysis of content from various resources of information encountered in research.

Design/methodology/approach

The system is described, including a rationale for its benefit to qualitative researchers utilising multiple sources of data.

Findings

The system is designed mainly to assist the academic expedition of postgraduate students predominantly engaged in qualitative research. It covers theoretical aspects of adult learning principles combined with a systematic method for managing qualitative data.

Originality/value

Working from the assumption that adult learners are time‐poor and likely to be working full‐time, the paper discusses these learners’ need for an efficient method of recording and retrieving information and provides a straightforward, cataloguing process which the author developed when conducting postgraduate research.

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2011

Kay Gallagher

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the macro‐factors and contextual variables surrounding the recent introduction of compulsory bilingual schooling in Abu Dhabi in…

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1926

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the macro‐factors and contextual variables surrounding the recent introduction of compulsory bilingual schooling in Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates, in order to generate informed discussion, and in order for stakeholders to understand the sociocultural, linguistic and pedagogical issues involved.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is an analytic one which examines language‐in‐education in Abu Dhabi through a framework of the operational, situational and outcomes factors involved in bilingual education, as identified by Spolsky et al. and Beardsmore. Insights gained from international empirical research into bilingual education are applied to the Abu Dhabi context, and key questions about the specific model of bilingual education selected are posed for future local research to answer.

Findings

The paper concludes that bilingual education is likely to confer linguistic, academic and socioeconomic benefits on future generations of Emirati school leavers. However, the acquisition of biliteracy is likely to be challenging because of the diglossic features of Arabic, as well as the linguistic distance between Arabic and English. Because of the ambiguity of international research findings with regard to the appropriate age to begin second language learning, as well as uncertainty about the merits of simultaneous versus sequential teaching of biliteracy, research must be undertaken in Abu Dhabi schools into the effects of bilingual education under conditions of early Arabic/English immersion.

Originality/value

This paper is timely given the recent announcement of compulsory and universal bilingual state schooling from an early age in Abu Dhabi, and necessary given the dearth of discussion and research on language‐in‐education matters in the Arab world. While the paper is contextualised within the school system of Abu Dhabi, it has resonance for adjacent Gulf States and for the many expatriates from across the Middle East who teach and study in Abu Dhabi's schools.

Details

Education, Business and Society: Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-7983

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