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Article
Publication date: 5 August 2019

Maria Sääksjärvi and Katarina Hellén

Development of new products is important for firm success; however, firms often struggle to identify the best ideas from multiple options. The purpose of this paper is to…

Abstract

Purpose

Development of new products is important for firm success; however, firms often struggle to identify the best ideas from multiple options. The purpose of this paper is to study how innovators and early adopters can be used for identifying the best ideas, i.e. the ideas that appeal to mass-market customers.

Design/methodology/approach

Two empirical studies were conducted. Study 1 concerned the development of a symbolic innovation, whereas Study 2 focused on a functional innovation. Each study consisted of two parts: idea generation and idea evaluation. In Study 1 there were 124 idea generators and 248 idea evaluators. In Study 2 there were 104 idea generators and 108 evaluators.

Findings

Both studies demonstrate that innovators and early adopters are able to predict the ideas that appeal to mass-market customers. Yet, it was also shown that this prediction depends on the nature of the idea. In the case of ideas for products that are predominantly symbolic in nature (Study 1), innovators and early adopters predict the buying intentions of mass-market consumers via the perceived novelty of the idea. In turn, for ideas that are predominantly functional in nature, innovators and early adopters predict the buying intentions of mass-market consumers directly via buying intentions.

Originality/value

These findings show that innovators and early adopters can be used for selecting the best ideas from a plethora of available options. This is the first time that innovators and early adopters have been empirically demonstrated to hold such a role.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Lei Han and Daniel F. Hsiao

The purpose of this study is to investigate the long-term performance of firms that early adopted Statement of Financial Accounting Standard 142 (SFAS 142).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the long-term performance of firms that early adopted Statement of Financial Accounting Standard 142 (SFAS 142).

Design/methodology/approach

In particular, the paper focuses on a relatively lengthy time frame after the standard became effective in 2002 and examines whether the firms which early adopted SFAS 142 exhibit different characteristics from their non-early adopting counterparts when comparing operating returns, stock returns and earnings quality over the same time period. Profit margin, return on assets and return on equity are used to measure operating returns; buy-and-hold return, Tobin’s Q and price-to-book ratio are used to measure stock returns; and abnormal accruals and accruals quality are used to measure earnings quality.

Findings

Based on a sample of 692 firm-year observations over five years between 2002 and 2006, the authors find that early adopters tend to exhibit lower operating performance (most noticeable when measuring profit margin and return on assets) and lower earnings quality following the early adoption of SFAS 142 than non-early adopters. However, little relation is found between post-adoption market returns and the choice to early adopt SFAS 142.

Research limitations/implications

This study helps fill the gap in accounting literature by investigating the long-term performance of firms post adoption of SFAS 142. The empirical results may provide greater understanding of the firms choosing to early adopt SFAS 142, and offer additional insight to guide standard setters on similar accounting issues in the future.

Originality/value

This study’s research questions attempt to identify potential differences in operating and stock performance and earnings quality by comparing early adopters and non-early adopters of SFAS 142 over a five-year period between 2002 and 2006, which extends the research beyond the relatively short window covered by prior research, and also takes into consideration Statement of Financial Accounting Standard 141 (SFAS 141)-R “Business Combination”, issued in 2007, to supersede SFAS 141 of 2001.

Details

International Journal of Accounting & Information Management, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1834-7649

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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2008

Tobias Schoenherr

To investigate the diffusion of online reverse auctions by exploring differences between their early, late and lagging adopters. More specifically, adopter categories are…

Abstract

Purpose

To investigate the diffusion of online reverse auctions by exploring differences between their early, late and lagging adopters. More specifically, adopter categories are compared against organizational characteristics and auction behavior as a result of learning. Organizational characteristics include number of employees and purchasing authority structure (PAS). Differences in learning are investigated by behavioral manifestations, consisting of the savings achieved, as well as the use of bundles in reverse auctions.

Design/methodology/approach

Four hypotheses were developed based on academic and trade literature. Data were collected with a large‐scale online survey among members of the Institute for Supply Management, receiving 363 complete and useable responses. Records were split into three adopter categories based on whether the respondent's firm adopted reverse auctions early (before April 2002) or late (after April 2002), or whether the adoption was merely planned. Differences related to the time of adoption were explored via nonparametric χ2 contingency table analyses. The χ2 statistic was used to determine whether a hypothesis is supported or rejected.

Findings

Adopter categories differ in regards to number of employees, the savings achieved, and their use of bundles. No differences were detected in terms of PAS. Explanations for these findings are provided.

Practical implications

The results support the diffusion of online reverse auctions, provide encouragement for their adoption especially also by smaller firms, and suggest that late adopters are not disadvantaged when compared to their early‐adopting counterparts.

Originality/value

No published studies have investigated the diffusion of online reverse auctions for business‐to‐business procurement, or explored potential differences between early adopters, late adopters and laggards.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2017

Theo Lynn, Laurent Muzellec, Barbara Caemmerer and Darach Turley

This paper aims to provide a social network site influence (SNSI) profile of early adopters. This study explores the relationship between personality traits of early

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a social network site influence (SNSI) profile of early adopters. This study explores the relationship between personality traits of early adopters of social network sites (SNS), their propensity to share information and rumors and their general SNSI.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was sent to the first users of Twitter (n = 200) and Google+ (n = 130) to assess their personality traits. Answers of each respondent were matched to their SNSI scores from Klout and PeerIndex, the industry standard for measuring SNSI.

Findings

Early adopters of SNS, in comparison to market mavens, are more likely to exert influence on one particular topic related to their profession: technology and the internet. Their levels of extraversion, openness and conscientiousness have a positive and significant impact on information sharing, and a negative impact on rumor sharing. Both, information sharing and rumor sharing have a positive and significant impact on the general SNSI of early adopters.

Originality/value

Firms struggle to decide whether to invest early in the life of newly created SNS as they are unsure about the characteristics of early adopters of such networks, and, more importantly, whether these sites are effective initial vectors for word-of-mouth. The findings demonstrate that early adopters’ influence (SNSI score) is on par with that of the rest of SNS users, suggesting their influence may be somewhat limited. The study also shows that the opinion leadership impact of the more influential early adopters is monomorphic in nature, being mainly confined to the related technology and internet domains.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2017

Mattia Bianchi, Anthony Di Benedetto, Simone Franzò and Federico Frattini

The purpose of this paper is to bring new empirical evidence to the controversial role of early adopters in the diffusion of innovations in industrial markets.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to bring new empirical evidence to the controversial role of early adopters in the diffusion of innovations in industrial markets.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors apply an actor market configuration perspective to the analysis of four longitudinal case studies regarding the commercialization of new products in the textile, plastic and energy industries.

Findings

The diffusion of innovation is an interactive and iterative process where the commercializing firm engages in repeated interactions with different categories of companies that are targeted as potential early adopters. This process ends when the commercializing firm identifies a category of early adopters that can stimulate subsequent acceptance in the later market, by playing one of the following two roles, i.e. word-of-mouth trigger and industry benchmark. During this process, through which the role of the early adopters is constructed proactively by the commercializing firm, the product innovation is also subject to changes to provide a better fit with the selected category of early adopters.

Research limitations/implications

The paper calls for a re-conceptualization of the diffusion process, from a passive identification of early adopters to an interactive process that entails a trial-and-error approach in the targeting and involvement of different categories of early adopters, which ends when the innovation reaches the desired levels of diffusion.

Practical implications

The study provides managers with a number of recommendations for selecting the most proper category of early adopters for their innovations, depending on the role they are more likely to play and the influence they will exert on subsequent acceptance in the later market.

Social implications

The study provides managers with a number of recommendations for targeting, through a trial-and-error process, early adopters and working with them to champion the dissemination of new technologies.

Originality/value

This paper significantly adds to existing literature on the diffusion of innovation, which has up to now conceived early adopters as static and given entities, which cannot be proactively selected by the commercializing firm, and innovation as an immutable object.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Shu‐Shian Ling, Ho Jung Choo and Dawn Thorndike Pysarchik

The purposes of this research were to compare the attitudes about new food purchases between innovators/early adopters and non‐innovators, and to determine the food…

Abstract

The purposes of this research were to compare the attitudes about new food purchases between innovators/early adopters and non‐innovators, and to determine the food purchase characteristics of innovators/early adopters and non‐innovators. Data were collected in ten locations in India between November 1999 and February 2000. Including income as a covariate, MANCOVA was performed to determine how innovators/early adopters and non‐innovators differed in their attitudes about new food purchases. The findings revealed some important characteristics of food innovators/early adopters: they tend to be opinion leaders, seek variety in food types and brands, and are more responsive to sales promotions and advertisements. Food prices are relatively important to both consumer groups. Marketing implications for food businesses are discussed.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2016

John Z. Ni, Steve A. Melnyk, William J. Ritchie and Barbara F. Flynn

The purpose of this paper is to focus on adoption of certified management standards, specifically public standards. Such standards play an increasingly important role in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on adoption of certified management standards, specifically public standards. Such standards play an increasingly important role in today’s business environment. However, to generate adoption benefits, they must be first widely accepted – a situation where they have become viewed as the de facto norms. For this state to occur early adopters play a critical role. Past research has argued that early adopters, in exchange for assuming more risk, are rewarded with higher economic returns. Yet, these findings are based on private, not public standards. With public standards, early adopters do not receive such benefits. There is evidence that public standards are becoming more important. This situation leads to a simple but important question addressed in this study – if early adopters assume the risks of embracing a new public standard without economic benefits, then what is their motivation? To resolve this question, this study draws on agency theory and prospect theory. The authors argue that early adopters embrace such standards because of their desire to minimize risk resulting from failure to support the goal at the heart of the public standards.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were obtained from the Customs-Trade Partnership Against Terrorism (C-TPAT) Partners Cost Benefit Survey and analyzed through structural equation modeling.

Findings

Early adopters of public standards are not driven by economic benefits but rather by the need to minimize their exposure to the risks associated with failing to satisfy the goals associated with a public standard. In other words, they were motivated by the need to minimize costs. In the case of C-TPAT, these costs are those of failing to provide or improve network security.

Research limitations/implications

This study has shed new light on the standards adoption process by clarifying the specific motivations that drive early adoption of a public standard. In addition to identifying the loss aversion motives of early adopters and economic benefit motives of later adopters, the authors have also elaborated on the notion that standards have differing levels of precedence, particularly when comparing private with public standards.

Practical implications

In a world characterized by increasing demands for outcomes such as improved security and where governmental funding is falling, due to growing deficits and governments that are becoming more conservative, the authors expect the use of public standards to increase.

Originality/value

Different from prior research on private standard, the paper focuses on the organizations involved in the adoption and diffusion of a public standard, with special attention being devoted to the early adopters. The paper provides a theoretical explanation for the actions of early adopters of a public standard through the theoretical lens of prospect theory.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 36 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1998

Eva Martinez, Yolanda Polo and Carlos Flavián

The diffusion process of an innovation, whether it be a product, a service or an idea, will vary in function of the characteristics of that innovation, as well as of the…

Abstract

The diffusion process of an innovation, whether it be a product, a service or an idea, will vary in function of the characteristics of that innovation, as well as of the agents to whom it is directed. The objective of this paper is to differentiate the behaviour of the different adopter categories that emerge at the time of the adoption of new products. Uses the methodology proposed by Mahajan et al., based on the Bass model, which allows for a distinction to be drawn between five categories of adopters, namely innovators, early adopters, early majority, late majority and laggards, with reference to the acceptance process for new consumer durables. This is employed in an empirical application carried out with respect to the adoption of various consumer durables that are frequently found in the majority of households, whilst the demographic and socio‐economic characteristics of the individuals who make up each adopter category are used in order to differentiate their behaviour.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2010

José María Castellano

This paper aims to analyze the determinants of broadband diffusion, taking into account supply‐side factors such as market entry regulation and demand‐side factors such as

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyze the determinants of broadband diffusion, taking into account supply‐side factors such as market entry regulation and demand‐side factors such as secondary education attainment.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper analyzes 27 countries from the European Union (EU) from 1996 to 2009 using qualitative comparative analysis (QCA), which combines quantitative and qualitative methods.

Findings

The main findings point out that there is one way for “innovator” adopters and “laggard” adopters in broadband diffusion, while there are few ways for the remaining adopters. Moreover, high entry regulation is associated more with “innovator” adopters, “early adopters” and “early majority adopters” in broadband diffusion, while medium and low entry regulations are associated more with “late majority” and “laggard” adopters in broadband diffusion.

Social implications

This paper suggests that high secondary school attainment is a necessary factor for broadband innovator countries. By contrast, low income and low secondary school attainment are factors connected with late majority and laggard broadband adopters.

Originality/value

At present, there is no other research about broadband diffusion or technology diffusion that uses this mixed approach. While the results may not be very conclusive, they will serve as an initial springboard for further research into more specific‐variable studies.

Details

info, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2018

Hyun-Sun Ryu

The purpose of this paper is to better understand why people are willing or hesitant to use Financial technology (Fintech) as well as to determine whether the effect of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to better understand why people are willing or hesitant to use Financial technology (Fintech) as well as to determine whether the effect of perceived benefits and risks of continuance intention differs depending on user types.

Design/methodology/approach

Original data were collected via a survey of 243 participants with Fintech usage experience. The partial least squares method was used to test the proposed model.

Findings

The results reveal that legal risk had the most negative effect on the Fintech continuance intention, while convenience had the strongest positive effect. Differences in specific benefit and risk impacts are found between early and late adopters.

Originality/value

This empirical study contributes to the novel understanding of the benefit and risk factors affecting the Fintech continuance intention.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 118 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

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