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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2022

Flávio Luiz von der Osten and Ana Maria Toaldo

The purpose of this paper is to propose that a stakeholder orientation (SO) can explain social and economic performances. It happens because the more the organisation…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose that a stakeholder orientation (SO) can explain social and economic performances. It happens because the more the organisation acquires and disseminates stakeholder intelligence, the more it will be aware of the needs of different stakeholder groups, bending the decision making towards less powerful stakeholders and creating social performance. At the same time, more stakeholder intelligence is a strategic resource to be exploited favouring the economic performance. Moreover, it is proposed this effect is mediated by social motivations.

Design/methodology/approach

In all, 251 Brazilian agricultural cooperatives were sampled and a survey primary data collection method was applied. To test our hypothesis, the partial least squares structural equation modelling method is used.

Findings

It is found that SO positively influences social and economic performances. Social motivation mediates the relationship between SO and social performance.

Originality/value

Social performance has gained importance because strategies harmful to society are not acceptable anymore and because of the link with economic performance. However, the strategic marketing literature is still scant on how marketing can drive economic and social performance at the same time.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Book part
Publication date: 28 October 2021

Nuraddeen Abubakar Nuhu, Kevin Baird and Sophia Su

This study examines the impact of environmental activity management (EAM) on triple bottom line (TBL) performance and the role that sustainability strategies play in…

Abstract

This study examines the impact of environmental activity management (EAM) on triple bottom line (TBL) performance and the role that sustainability strategies play in mediating these relationships. Data were collected using a survey of Australian managers and analysed using structural equation modelling (SEM). The findings indicate that each of the three levels of EAM – Environmental Activity Analysis, Environmental Activity Cost Analysis, and Environmental Activity Based Costing – influence-specific aspects of performance, either directly and/or indirectly through environmental and social sustainability strategies. The findings suggest that managers could enhance their use of EAM practices through the use of sustainability strategies in order to enhance performance. This study provides empirical insight into the impact that EAM practices and environmental and social sustainability strategies have on all three aspects of TBL performance.

Book part
Publication date: 16 October 2014

Robert W. Rutledge, Khondkar E. Karim, Mark Aleksanyan and Chenlong Wu

Research in the field of corporate social responsibility (CSR) has grown exponentially in the last few decades. Nevertheless, significant debate remains about the…

Abstract

Research in the field of corporate social responsibility (CSR) has grown exponentially in the last few decades. Nevertheless, significant debate remains about the relationship between CSR performance and corporate financial performance (CFP). This is particularly true for the case of Chinese state-owned enterprises (SOEs). The purpose of the current study is to empirically test the relationship between CSR and CFP. We use data for 66 Chinese SOEs listed on the Shanghai and Shenzhen stock exchanges. The results are interesting in that they are not consistent with similar studies using US and other Western market data. We find a significant negative relationship between CSR performance and CFP. The results are discussed in light of the preferential government treatment afforded to Chinese SOEs, and social welfare requirements imposed on such entities. Implications for Chinese policy-makers are discussed.

Details

Accounting for the Environment: More Talk and Little Progress
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-303-2

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 12 March 2020

Marco Masip

Despite all the attempts developed so far to measure corporate social performance in the last decades, a standard metric for it is still missing. In this work, the author…

Abstract

Despite all the attempts developed so far to measure corporate social performance in the last decades, a standard metric for it is still missing. In this work, the author tries to understand why is this the case. To do so, the author has reviewed 69 relevant metrics developed in the literature since the 1970s until today, covering approaches based on social, reputational, and environmental ratings, as well as several others constructed ad hoc by reputated scholars. The author analyzes each of them through a double optics, checking if they meet the minimum requirements to be considered standard and truly social. The research reveals that the main factor that prevents such a standard is the lack of truly social orientation of the existing metrics.

Details

Non-Financial Disclosure and Integrated Reporting: Practices and Critical Issues
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-964-4

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 17 September 2020

Federica Angeli, Jörg Raab and Leon Oerlemans

Project networks are an increasingly salient organisational temporary form to deal with complex problems. It remains unclear, however, whether and how project networks…

Abstract

Project networks are an increasingly salient organisational temporary form to deal with complex problems. It remains unclear, however, whether and how project networks adapt over time, and hence implement changes, both within the span of the specific project, and across projects. The authors apply the performance feedback (PF) perspective to explore how adaptive responses to PF are organised and absorbed within project networks. The authors investigate these matters in the area of humanitarian and development aid efforts, which represent complex social issues. In this context, project networks involve a multitude of actors at different distances from the implementation field, ranging from the donor, through an international Non-Governmental Organisation (NGO), to the NGO’s country offices, local NGOs and the beneficiary communities. This study’s qualitative findings, which the authors generate through an abductive analytical process, highlight that project networks dealing with complex social issues face six paradoxes based on work by DeFillippi and Sydow: the distance, difference, identity, learning, temporal and performance paradoxes. Collective goal setting, adaptive monitoring and evaluation practices, and continuous re-negotiation of aspiration levels emerge as coping mechanisms enabling project networks to internalise insights from the field and translate them into adaptive behavioural responses, mainly at the intra-project level. The authors contribute to a better understanding of adaption in these temporary forms, and particularly in its behavioural consequences. The study also advances knowledge on the PF perspective, through its application in temporary settings, on the level of the project network and in the context of complex social issues, where organisational arrangements strive to pursue multiple interdependent goals.

Book part
Publication date: 3 May 2018

Charles P. Cullinan, Lois S. Mahoney and Pamela B. Roush

We examine the perceived influence of externally generated firm ratings of corporate social responsibility (CSR) on voting for shareholder-sponsored CSR proposals. Using…

Abstract

We examine the perceived influence of externally generated firm ratings of corporate social responsibility (CSR) on voting for shareholder-sponsored CSR proposals. Using stakeholder and legitimacy theories, we introduce two rationales that relate shareholder voting decisions to the firm’s CSR performance: the complementary perspective where investors rely on management’s branding or image of the firm for CSR performance, and the sufficiency perspective where shareholders consider legitimacy effects of firm CSR performance. Our examination of 473 CSR shareholder-sponsored proposals during the 2013 to 2015 proxy seasons reveals a negative relationship between support for shareholder-sponsored CSR proposals and CSR strengths, particularly for social and environmental CSR strengths. We also find a positive relationship between support for shareholder-sponsored CSR proposals and CSR concerns, particular in the area of environmental CSR concerns. These results partially support the sufficiency perspective that incorporates shareholder legitimacy concerns. When companies have poor CSR performance, shareholders may view further CSR initiatives as beneficial to the firm.

Details

Research on Professional Responsibility and Ethics in Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-973-9

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 31 July 2014

Eric Yanfei Zhao

In this chapter, I develop a theoretical framework to address the financial–social performance debate in strategy research, drawing on literatures on institutional logics…

Abstract

Purpose

In this chapter, I develop a theoretical framework to address the financial–social performance debate in strategy research, drawing on literatures on institutional logics and organizational forms.

Methodology/design

I test the theoretical framework using an exploratory empirical approach based on ideal types with global microfinance data. A joint consideration of financial and social performances of microfinance organizations (MFOs) helps classify them into four ideal types – self-sustainable, mission-drifting, failing, and subsidized. I examine how an MFO’s organizational form and the configurations of institutional logics of the nation within which it is embedded jointly explain which ideal type the MFO falls into.

Findings

Based on a study of 1455 MFOs in 98 countries between 1995 and 2007, I show that the interactions between national institutional logics and organizational forms add significant predicting power in estimating MFOs’ ideal types. Explaining the intricate relationships between the financial and social performance of MFOs thus requires a simultaneous consideration of both the configuration of national logics and organizational forms.

Originality/value

The theoretical framework introduced in this chapter builds on recent developments in the institutional logics perspective and research on organizational forms, extending our understanding of the financial–social performance relationship among organizations. It also advances the social entrepreneurship literature by focusing our attention on various institutions at both national and organizational levels that may facilitate or inhibit social venture efficacy.

Details

Social Entrepreneurship and Research Methods
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-141-1

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 February 2022

Camélia Radu, Nadia Smaili and Adela Constantinescu

This study investigates the relation between the board of directors' attributes and corporate social performance. The authors examine three board of directors…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates the relation between the board of directors' attributes and corporate social performance. The authors examine three board of directors: characteristics, size, independence and gender diversity, and how they interact with industry to affect corporate social performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use a multivariate approach to analyze and compare the effects of governance variables on two aspects of corporate social performance, its environmental and social dimensions.

Findings

Based on a sample of 983 firm-year observations, our main findings indicate that board independence, size and gender diversity each has a different impact on the environmental and social dimensions of performance, but that industrial sector moderates these effects. In particular, our results show that board member independence is positively associated with the environmental dimension of the performance of all the sample industries, but only has a positive association with the social dimension when the firms are in industries other than those that are environmentally sensitive. For these latter industries, board independence is negatively associated with the social dimension. Board size is positively associated with the environmental dimension for environmentally sensitive industries only and with the social dimension for all the industries examined, with a stronger positive effect on the latter in regard to environmentally sensitive industries.

Research limitations/implications

Women directors appear to raise social and environmental concerns within the board, as evidenced by their positive effect on the firms' social and environmental performance, with a stronger impact on the former.

Practical implications

Regulators can promote changes to the way Canadian companies select directors for the purpose of achieving sustainable performance while investors will be better informed about the impact of some of the board attributes on the environmental and social dimension of performance.

Originality/value

This study provides a portrait of the impact of governance attributes on the environmental and social dimension of performance of Canadian companies. Given the increasing interest in gender diversity in recent years, this study provides new evidence on the benefits of female board members for the two non-financial dimensions of performance.

Details

Journal of Applied Accounting Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-5426

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 December 2021

Jingsi Zhang, Liangqun Qi, Chengdong Wang and Xichen Lyu

This study aims to examine how servitization affects the environmental and social performance of manufacturing firms.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine how servitization affects the environmental and social performance of manufacturing firms.

Design/methodology/approach

The hypotheses are tested using fixed-effect panel models based on secondary data of 1,413 manufacturing firms publicly listed in the USA.

Findings

Results show that servitization is positively related to the social performance of manufacturing firms; this positive relationship is more prominent under high levels of human resource slack. However, the impact of servitization on environmental performance depends on the level of absorptive capacity and human resource slack. Servitization improves environmental performance under high levels of absorptive capacity and human resource slack, while this positive impact is insignificant under low levels of absorptive capacity and human resource slack.

Research limitations/implications

The study focuses on the degree (depth) of servitization but ignores the scope of services provided by manufacturing firms (breadth of servitization).

Practical implications

This research suggests that servitization is an effective way of achieving simultaneous improvements in environmental and social performance. However, high levels of absorptive capacity and human resource slack are needed to achieve this goal.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the servitization literature by demonstrating the environmental and social sustainability benefits of servitization. The findings also highlight the crucial role of absorptive capacity and human resource slack on improving environmental and social performance through servitization.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 September 2021

Ahmed Agyapong, Suzzie Owiredua Aidoo and Samuel Yaw Akomea

The paper sought to uncover the conditions under which managerial capability enhances performance while considering the role of social capital within the unique boundary…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper sought to uncover the conditions under which managerial capability enhances performance while considering the role of social capital within the unique boundary conditions created by competitive intensity.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use multi-source data from 206 managers and owners of SMEs from a Sub-Saharan African nation – Ghana.

Findings

Using structural equation modeling (SEM) to analysis the data, the findings revealed that social capital serves as a mechanism through which managerial capability influences performance. Furthermore, the results indicate that competitive intensity does not significantly moderate this important indirect relationship. Implications: This study provides relevant knowledge for scholars, practitioners and policymakers on the role of managerial capability and how it may be harnessed in enhancing performance.

Originality/value

This paper provides a holistic understanding of the capability performance relationship in attempts at extending the literature by examining social capital as a mediator and competitive intensity as a contingent factor of this important relationship in a conditional indirect model.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 71 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

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