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Article
Publication date: 14 December 2017

Saskia Ryan, Nicole Sherretts, Dominic Willmott, Dara Mojtahedi and Benjamin M. Baughman

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of response bias and target gender on detecting deception.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of response bias and target gender on detecting deception.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants were randomly assigned to one of three experimental conditions: a stereotype condition (bogus training group), a tell-signs condition (empirically tested cues), and a control condition. Participants were required to decide whether eight targets were lying or telling the truth, based upon the information they had been given. Accuracy was measured via a correct or incorrect response to the stimuli. The data were then analyzed using a 2×2×3 mixed analysis of variance (ANOVA) to determine whether any main or interactional effects were present.

Findings

Results revealed training condition had no significant effect on accuracy, nor was there a within-subject effect of gender. However, there was a significant main effect of accuracy in detecting truth or lies, and a significant interaction between target gender and detecting truth or lies.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should seek a larger sample of participants with a more extensive training aspect developed into the study, as the brief training offered here may not be fully reflective of the extent and intensity of training which could be offered to professionals.

Originality/value

Within the criminal justice system, the need for increased accuracy in detecting deception is of critical importance; not only to detect whether a guilty individual is being deceitful, but also whether someone is making a false confession, both to improve community safety by detaining the correct perpetrator for the crime but also to maintain public trust in the justice system. The present research provides a fresh insight into the importance of training effects in detecting deception.

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 June 2023

Ethan Conroy, Dominic Willmott, Anthony Murphy and B. Kennath Widanaralalage

Understanding of the role that attitudes and beliefs may play on the judgments people make about intimate partner violence (IPV) is becoming increasingly important, notably in the…

Abstract

Purpose

Understanding of the role that attitudes and beliefs may play on the judgments people make about intimate partner violence (IPV) is becoming increasingly important, notably in the context of the criminal justice process and in recognising IPV as a public health issue. This study aims to investigate the importance of several established factors predictive of attitudes towards male-perpetrated IPV, which have never previously been explored in relation to female-perpetrated IPV.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 295 young adults (18–28) from across the UK completed an online survey (M Age = 23.82) comprised of four established psychometric inventories; the Rosenberg Self-esteem scale, Satisfaction with Life scale, Attitudes Towards Female Dating Violence scale and newly developed Modern Adolescent Dating Violence Attitudes (MADVA) scale, alongside a suite of associated demographic factors.

Findings

Results derived from a multiple linear regression indicates that three types of attitudes towards male-perpetrated violence against women (physical, sexual, and psychological abuse offline), were significant predictors of attitudes towards female-perpetrated IPV, along with gender and ethnicity. Self-esteem, satisfaction with life, age and education among those surveyed were not associated with attitudes towards female-perpetrated IPV.

Practical implications

The results have important implications in developing educational programmes for those who have committed IPV offences, as well as teaching young people about the nature of partner abuse.

Originality/value

The results suggest that those who endorse attitudes supportive of male-perpetrated IPV in offline environments, also endorse violence-supportive beliefs towards female-perpetrated IPV. In effect, violence-supportive attitudes are held irrespective of the sex of the perpetrator. However, this may differ in terms of how individuals view online types of abuse, where these attitudes appear to be processed differentially to offline attitudes.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 August 2023

Georgina Thornton, Dominic Willmott, Emma Richardson and Lara Hudspith

Many women report experiences of street harassment during their lifetime. Previous quantitative survey research has shown the variety of ways in which this type of harassment can…

Abstract

Purpose

Many women report experiences of street harassment during their lifetime. Previous quantitative survey research has shown the variety of ways in which this type of harassment can impact upon a victim’s life, including restricting their freedom of movement and fear of further victimisation. The purpose of this study is understand the immediate and enduring psychological impact of street harassment on female victim-survivors.

Design/methodology/approach

The present study aims to explore, qualitatively, women’s experiences of street harassment through thematic analysis of on 35 online blog posts. Data were collected from the “Stop Street Harassment” website, where women are invited to share their experiences anonymously.

Findings

Three main themes were generated from the data. First was the age at which women began to experience street harassment, with recurring early incidents during formative childhood years. Second was the impact that experiences had on their mental health and psychological well-being with feelings of shame, fear, self-loathing, as well as decreased self-esteem and confidence experienced in the immediate aftermath – though the longer-term negative emotions reported were enduring feelings of anger alongside a constant state of anxiety from feelings of vulnerability to further victimisation. The final theme was the modification of behaviour after experiencing street harassment where women choose to avoid walking alone on the streets or consciously changed their clothing choices, to avoid being harassed.

Originality/value

This study offers a further qualitative insight into the real-life experience and psychological consequences of street harassment upon survivors’ mental health.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 June 2019

Agata Debowska, Daniel Boduszek, Dominic Willmott and Adele D. Jones

The purpose of this paper is to develop and validate the None in Three Victim Responsiveness Assessment (Ni3: VRA) examining affective and cognitive responsiveness toward victims…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop and validate the None in Three Victim Responsiveness Assessment (Ni3: VRA) examining affective and cognitive responsiveness toward victims of intimate partner violence.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected at two time points in a sample of 359 young people from Barbados and Grenada (56.27 percent female; M age=12.73 years).

Findings

Confirmatory factor analysis results indicated that the Ni3: VRA scores are best captured by a two-factor solution, including affective and cognitive dimensions. A test-retest correlation confirmed the reliability of the Ni3: VRA over time. Affective responsiveness formed a significant positive association with caring/cooperative behavior.

Originality/value

The Ni3: VRA can be used for the evaluation of preventive strategies aimed at reducing the rates of IPV.

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2016

Nicole Sherretts and Dominic Willmott

The purpose of this paper is to test the construct validity and dimensionality of the measure of criminal social identity (MCSI) within both a combined sample of American…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test the construct validity and dimensionality of the measure of criminal social identity (MCSI) within both a combined sample of American, Pakistani, and Polish inmates, as well as examined as individual country samples.

Design/methodology/approach

Adopting a cross-sectional survey design, the opportunistic sample consisted of offenders incarcerated in three different countries; 351 inmates from Poland, 501 from the USA, and 319 from Pakistan (combined data set n=1,171), with inmates completing anonymous, self-administered, paper-and-pencil questionnaires. Traditional confirmatory factor analysis, along with confirmatory bi-factor modelling, was used in order to examine the fit of four different models of criminal social identity (CSI).

Findings

Results revealed that data were best explained by a three-factor model of CSI (cognitive centrality, in-group ties, and in-group affect) within both combined and individual offender samples. Composite reliability indicated that the three factors were measured with very good reliability.

Research limitations/implications

Validation of the MCSI within the large cross-cultural combined prison sample provides substantial support for the measure’s reliability and utility across diverse offender samples. Consideration of low factor loadings of items one and three for the Pakistan data set and item two for the US data set, leads the researchers to outline possible recommendations that these questions be reworded and additional items be added.

Originality/value

This is the first study to validate MCSI cross-culturally and specifically utilising a western prison sample, consisting of male and female offenders.

Article
Publication date: 14 September 2023

Agata Debowska, Daniel Boduszek, Christine Fray-Aiken, Eric Awich Ochen, Karyl T. Powell-Booth, Esther Nanfuka Kalule, Roxanne Harvey, Florence Turyomurugyendo, Kenisha Nelson, Dominic Willmott and Samantha Mason

Few studies assess how child abuse and neglect (CAN) affects adolescents’ mental health. Further, the majority of studies conducted to date discount the individual CAN items and…

Abstract

Purpose

Few studies assess how child abuse and neglect (CAN) affects adolescents’ mental health. Further, the majority of studies conducted to date discount the individual CAN items and report overall prevalence rates for different types of abuse and neglect. The purpose of this study was to examine the levels of and gender differences in CAN subtypes, lifetime prevalence of individual CAN items and the contribution of different CAN subtypes for explaining depression, anxiety and irritability.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample included Jamaican (n = 7,182, 60.8% female) and Ugandan (n = 11,518, 52.4% female) youths. The authors used a population-based cross-sectional study design. Youths completed an anonymous survey in school settings.

Findings

The authors found gender differences in the levels of CAN subtypes. Maltreatment behaviors of lesser severity were more commonly endorsed by the youths than those of greater severity. Neglect and emotional abuse were the strongest correlates of depression (e.g. neglect: ß = 0.23, among Jamaican youths; emotional abuse outside-the-home: ß = 0.23, among Ugandan girls), anxiety (e.g. neglect: ß = 0.17, among Ugandan girls; emotional abuse outside-the-home: ß = 0.27, among Ugandan girls) and irritability (e.g. emotional abuse in-the-home: ß = 0.17, among Jamaican boys; emotional abuse outside-the-home: ß = 0.17, among Ugandan girls) in most samples.

Originality/value

These findings will inform policymakers and professionals working with youths in Jamaica and Uganda, providing comprehensive contemporary insights beyond existing research in these regions.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 April 2015

Farhad Eizakshiri, Paul W. Chan and Margaret W. Emsley

In this paper, the dominant techno-rational view of studying delays in projects is challenged. In so doing, the purpose of this paper is to urge for more attention paid to…

1257

Abstract

Purpose

In this paper, the dominant techno-rational view of studying delays in projects is challenged. In so doing, the purpose of this paper is to urge for more attention paid to studying the intentionalities of the planners involved in planning the schedule for projects.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, the authors take a critical approach to review a range of literatures related to the concept of project delays. Through this review, the authors render the relative absence of acknowledging intentionality in the study of delays problematic. Therefore, the authors inject fresh insights into how intentionality can play a crucial role in advancing the understanding of project delays.

Findings

Prevailing research tends to assume the primacy of the project plan and conceptualise delays as a consequence of flawed execution. The review offers three possibilities for reconceptualising delays as a consequence of flawed plans. In so doing, the authors refocus the attention on how intentionality could play a crucial role in shaping “inaccurate” plans, which in turn could lead to the creation of delays.

Research limitations/implications

As a consequence of this review paper, the authors invite scholarship into project delays to move away from finding “cause-and-effect” mechanisms to attend more closely to the role intentionality plays in creating delays, whether intended, unintended, or imagined.

Originality/value

This paper brings intentionality to the fore to challenge the assumptions over the nature of delays. In so doing, the review expands the understanding of project delays by incorporating unintended, intended, and imaginary perspectives.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 April 2021

Mohammad Mehrabioun Mohammadi, Ali Jalali and Arezoo Hasani

This manuscript concentrates on addressing the success and failure factors to satisfy the small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) need when facing challenges during the…

1194

Abstract

Purpose

This manuscript concentrates on addressing the success and failure factors to satisfy the small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) need when facing challenges during the implementation of the quality management systems (QMSs) such as lack of both the financial and human resources and inadequate technical knowledge of quality management and employee indifference.

Design/methodology/approach

This research employs a mixed-method research approach in three different steps. First, based on interviews and a review of previous research, a list of critical factors influencing the success and failure of QMS implementation in SMEs is provided. After conducting the interview and extracting the results, a quantitative questionnaire is recruited as a complementary tool to demonstrate the accuracy of the literature review and interview findings and to increase the validity and reliability of the data. By applying the exploratory factor analysis (EFA) method, the factors affecting the failure and success of QMS implementation are identified separately. In the third step, a focus group meeting is used to name the factors and identify the relationships among them. The relationships among the factors are also shown using the concept map. Finally, after conducting the focus group meeting, several key issues have been extracted from practice and literature to realize the critical success and failure factors.

Findings

The current study reveals that the factors supporting the SMEs during the implementation of the QMSs may be classified into nine groups. Of these, six factors are related to critical success factors (CSFs), and three factors are related to critical failure factors (CFFs).

Originality/value

There have been several studies developed and conducted to address the success factors supporting the QMSs in SMEs. However, the scope of these studies has only been set on either qualitative or quantitative approaches. Hence, the proposed method presented in this essay, which is, in turn, a new contribution, attempts to use a combined approach based on both the semistructured interviews and survey methods. The results of this study can be used as a reference by scholars and practitioners to identify the relevant issues of QMSs and their application in SMEs.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 November 2019

Mohamad Abu Ghazaleh and Abdelrahim M. Zabadi

Internet of things (IoT) and big data (BD) could change how the societies function. This paper explores the role of IoT and BD and their impact on customer relationship management…

1677

Abstract

Purpose

Internet of things (IoT) and big data (BD) could change how the societies function. This paper explores the role of IoT and BD and their impact on customer relationship management (CRM) investments in modern customer service. The purpose of this paper is to develop an analytic hierarchy planning framework to establish criteria weights and to develop a general self-assessment model for determining the most important factors influencing the IoT and BD investment in CRM. The authors found that most studies have focused on conceptualizing the impact of IoT without BD and with limited empirical studies and analytical models. This paper sheds further light on the topic by presenting both IoT and BD aspects of future CRM.

Design/methodology/approach

The analytic hierarchy process (AHP) methodology is used to weight and prioritize the factors influencing the IoT and BD investment in modern CRM in the service industry. The AHP framework resulted in a ranking of 21 sustainability sub-factors based on evaluations by experienced information technology and customer service professionals.

Findings

The paper provides significant insight on the new frontier of CRM, focusing on the use of IoT and BD and the respective solutions to address them were identified. This study primarily contributes in providing the process of effectively managing and implementing IoT and BD in big businesses by identifying the connecting link between firms and customers.

Practical implications

The understanding of new frontier of CRM connective via IoT and BD can solve the dilemmas and challenges linked to the practice of implement IoT and BD in the information systems field. The study provides valuable information and critical analysis of IoT and BD with regard to the integration of CRM. Finally, this study further provides directions for future researchers.

Originality/value

IoT and BD are a growing phenomenon, which business decision-makers and information professionals need to consider seriously to properly ascertain the modern CRM dimensions in the digital economies. They also should embrace the proper CRM innovation, which is powered by IoT and BD, and discover how IoT and BD can bring the next level of maturity to CRM “CRM of everything.”

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

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