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Article
Publication date: 27 November 2009

Emilie Smeaton

Recent research has shown that children and young people are living on the streets in the UK with no support from family or other institutions and very few options for…

Abstract

Recent research has shown that children and young people are living on the streets in the UK with no support from family or other institutions and very few options for legitimate support, often resorting to dangerous survival strategies that put them at risk from others wishing to harm or exploit them. Many children and young people turn to the streets while still living with parents or carers to escape abuse in the home or because they do not receive attention and care. Integration of the homeless and non‐homeless populations sometimes plays a part in how children or young people find themselves on the streets. Becoming part of a gang, whether formed by groups of homeless people or those from the non‐homeless population, is an important survival strategy when on the streets. Once children and young people reach 16, the range of options for support widens and they become eligible to access services for homeless adults which are often not appropriate for them. Where prevention is not possible, there should be a response to children and young people's needs through outreach work, drop‐in centres and accommodation that operate in an informal way and have the capacity to respond to further requests for support.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 March 2012

Emilie Smeaton

This paper outlines best practice in the commissioning of emergency accommodation for children and young people who run away, identifying: levels of need; models of…

193

Abstract

Purpose

This paper outlines best practice in the commissioning of emergency accommodation for children and young people who run away, identifying: levels of need; models of accommodation provision that have existed in the UK; approaches to funding; costs of emergency accommodation; the commissioning process; and service delivery issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is an expert opinion piece drawing upon a project commissioned by The Scottish Government based on extensive research including a review of the pre‐existing evidence base and new data.

Findings

Fixed refuge has been the most common form of emergency accommodation for young runaways in the UK and provides positive outcomes for young runaways relating to improved general well‐being, mental health and schooling. The costs of refuge can compare favourably to alternative specialised accommodation and support and prevent other costs relating to future episodes of running away, future offending, substance misuse and youth homelessness.

Practical implications

Evidence‐based learning has identified best practice in the commissioning of emergency accommodation related to a number of issues including: scoping activity; the commissioning process; costs; approaches to funding; effective future commissioning of emergency accommodation; why the third sector is best placed to deliver emergency accommodation; and ensuring key elements of service delivery are included to meet children and young people's need and achieve positive outcomes.

Originality/value

The commissioning of emergency accommodation for young runaways has received little attention in research; this paper goes some way to rectifying this omission alongside providing evidence‐based learning for commissioners and service delivery organisations.

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Tina Moules

The case for involving the users of health services in the NHS decision‐making process is clearly identified in a range of Government policy and guidance documents. A…

755

Abstract

The case for involving the users of health services in the NHS decision‐making process is clearly identified in a range of Government policy and guidance documents. A gradual shift from seeing users as passive recipients of care to active consumers of care has led to a belief that the opinions and views of users must be heard in particular in relation to clinical audit. Alongside this shift is the increasing recognition that the views of children and young people should be sought in decisions which affect their lives. Highlights the case for involving children and young people in clinical audit. Examines the background to user involvement in general, reviews the arguments for involving children and young people and identifies some of the barriers to that involvement. Introduces briefly new research being carried out with children and young people to explore ways of involving them in clinical audit.

Details

British Journal of Clinical Governance, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-4100

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 December 2010

Lisa Rippon

Children and young people with an intellectual disability (referred to in this article as young people) have a higher incidence of mental illness and challenging behaviour…

223

Abstract

Children and young people with an intellectual disability (referred to in this article as young people) have a higher incidence of mental illness and challenging behaviour than individuals without cognitive impairment. Inpatient assessment and treatment in a learning disability‐specific provision rather than mainstream inpatient child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) is most beneficial for those young people who experience a more severe intellectual disability or whose presenting complaint is challenging behaviour not associated with a co‐morbid mental illness. Assessment and treatment of this complex group of young people can only be successful if the services which manage them have access to a highly experienced and comprehensive multidisciplinary team. Admission is only worthwhile if recommendations that arise from the assessment can be transferred to the community and those involved in supporting the young person are motivated to work in collaboration with the inpatient team.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 30 December 2004

Farzaneh Moinian

Globalization of the media communications progressed rapidly during the twentieth century thanks to innumerable innovation within information technologies particularly…

Abstract

Globalization of the media communications progressed rapidly during the twentieth century thanks to innumerable innovation within information technologies particularly communications satellites, digitalization and advances in computer technology. Today we can utilize new communication systems that allow a worldwide distribution of messages from one place to another. In the middle of the global development of mass media we can find many children and young people. With their engaging, interactive properties, the new digital media are suggested to have more impact on how children grow and learn, what they value, and ultimately who they become than any other medium that has come before (Montgomery, 2002). New media technology influences the life and culture of young people. What is the nature of the content in it and whose values and judgments does it represent is a fatal question for educational researchers today.

Details

Identity, Agency and Social Institutions in Educational Ethnography
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-297-9

Book part
Publication date: 14 November 2022

Rachel Birnbaum

In 2018, significant legislative changes were made in child welfare in Ontario, Canada. As part of the changes, a Voluntary Youth Services Agreement was developed to allow…

Abstract

In 2018, significant legislative changes were made in child welfare in Ontario, Canada. As part of the changes, a Voluntary Youth Services Agreement was developed to allow young people between 16 and 17 years of age to obtain the necessary support services that they need to be able to further their independence, autonomy and agency in their lives. Yet, hearing directly from young people about the benefits and challenges of this program is limited. This study was intended to address these gaps. There were 15 young people (11 females and four males) who participated in a telephone interview about their views and experiences with the VYSA agreements. The majority spoke positively about the benefits of the programme and being able to continue their schooling, purchase clothing and obtain employment. They also believed that the programme allowed them more security and safety than being homeless. Some raised the challenges related to the amount of money that they received should be determined by the place that they reside in as some cities are more expensive than others. From a policy perspective, as the program continues, further changes may also be explored that examines the eligibility criteria where young people must be in need of protection before they can enter the program. In other words, moving from a deficit-based approach to a more child centred practice that includes hearing from young people in child welfare.

Book part
Publication date: 24 September 2015

Brian Simpson

The purpose of this paper is to explore the narratives that construct the practice and regulation of ‘sexting’, the sending of sexualised images via text message, when…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the narratives that construct the practice and regulation of ‘sexting’, the sending of sexualised images via text message, when engaged in by young people. The aim of this discussion is to better understand the extent to which those narratives recognise young people’s agency in relation to their sexuality and the role that new media plays in enabling youth to explore their sexual identity.

Methodology

The methodology employed is that of discourse analysis. This approach is used to deconstruct the dominant narrative of sexting contained in the literature, a narrative that constructs it as a problem to be contained and controlled, either through the application of the criminal law or through education and guidance approaches. This paper then investigates an emerging counter narrative that gives greater emphasis to the autonomy rights of youth. A case study involving a Parliamentary Inquiry in one Australian State into sexting is also employed to further this analysis.

Findings

This paper concludes that the dominant narrative remains the strongest influence in the shaping of law and the practice of sexting, but that young people may be better served by the counter narrative that recognises their agency in ways that may empower and grant them more control over their bodies.

Originality/Value

The paper thus provides an alternative approach to developing new law and policy with respect to the regulation of sexting by youth that should be of value to lawmakers and child and youth advocates.

Details

Technology and Youth: Growing Up in a Digital World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-265-8

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 25 September 2020

Deirdre Horgan, Shirley Martin and Catherine Forde

This chapter draws on data from a qualitative study examining the extent to which children and young people age 7 to 17 are able to participate and influence matters…

Abstract

This chapter draws on data from a qualitative study examining the extent to which children and young people age 7 to 17 are able to participate and influence matters affecting them in their home, school, and community. It was commissioned by the Department of Children and Youth Affairs in Ireland to inform the National Strategy on Children and Young People’s Participation in Decision-Making, 2015–2020. Utilising Lundy’s (2007) conceptualisation of Article 12 of the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child and Leonard’s (2016) concept of generagency, this chapter will examine children and young people’s everyday lives and relationships within the home and family in the context of agency and structure.

In the study, home was experienced by children generally as the setting most facilitative of their voice and participation in their everyday lives reflecting research findings that children are more likely to have their initiative and ideas encouraged in the family than in school or their wider communities (Mayall, 1994). Key areas of decision-making included everyday consumption activities such as food, clothes, and pocket money as well as temporal activities including bed-time, leisure, and friends. This concurs with Bjerke (2011) that consumption of various forms is a major field of children’s participation. Positive experiences of participation reported by children and young people involved facilitation by adults whom they respected and with whom they had some rapport. This locates children as relational beings, embedded in multiple overlapping intergenerational processes and highlights the interdependency between children’s participation and their environment (Leonard, 2016; Percy-Smith & Thomas, 2010).

Details

Bringing Children Back into the Family: Relationality, Connectedness and Home
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-197-6

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 14 November 2022

Louca-Mai Brady, Lucy Bray, Emma Beeden, Shelby Davies, Kath Evans and Andy Feltham

Whilst there is growing awareness of the case for children and young people's participation in health services and health service research, there is limited evidence on…

Abstract

Whilst there is growing awareness of the case for children and young people's participation in health services and health service research, there is limited evidence on how this apparent commitment to children's right to participate translates into practice.

The chapter, co-authored with and young people, draws on examples from the authors' original research and lived experience to consider the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on children and young people's participation in the United Kingdom (UK) National Health Service (NHS). There is evidence of children and young people in the UK becoming more reliant on parents and carers as conduits for engagement and as sources of information during the pandemic. Additionally, some children and young people with special educational needs and disability and other potentially vulnerable groups have engaged less with health services and have been excluded from participating by a move to digital platforms. Conversely online and phone involvement and consultations have led to higher inclusion for others. Adapting by necessity to COVID-19 has highlighted the potential for doing things differently and developing more participatory and inclusive practice in collaboration with children, in the UK and elsewhere. It is critical that children are involved in shaping the development of participation practice which challenges and reshapes institutional practices in health services and beyond.

Details

Establishing Child Centred Practice in a Changing World, Part A
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-407-7

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Ethics and Integrity in Research with Children and Young People
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-401-1

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