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Article
Publication date: 27 November 2009

Emilie Smeaton

Recent research has shown that children and young people are living on the streets in the UK with no support from family or other institutions and very few options for…

Abstract

Recent research has shown that children and young people are living on the streets in the UK with no support from family or other institutions and very few options for legitimate support, often resorting to dangerous survival strategies that put them at risk from others wishing to harm or exploit them. Many children and young people turn to the streets while still living with parents or carers to escape abuse in the home or because they do not receive attention and care. Integration of the homeless and non‐homeless populations sometimes plays a part in how children or young people find themselves on the streets. Becoming part of a gang, whether formed by groups of homeless people or those from the non‐homeless population, is an important survival strategy when on the streets. Once children and young people reach 16, the range of options for support widens and they become eligible to access services for homeless adults which are often not appropriate for them. Where prevention is not possible, there should be a response to children and young people's needs through outreach work, drop‐in centres and accommodation that operate in an informal way and have the capacity to respond to further requests for support.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2012

Emilie Smeaton

This paper outlines best practice in the commissioning of emergency accommodation for children and young people who run away, identifying: levels of need; models of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper outlines best practice in the commissioning of emergency accommodation for children and young people who run away, identifying: levels of need; models of accommodation provision that have existed in the UK; approaches to funding; costs of emergency accommodation; the commissioning process; and service delivery issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is an expert opinion piece drawing upon a project commissioned by The Scottish Government based on extensive research including a review of the pre‐existing evidence base and new data.

Findings

Fixed refuge has been the most common form of emergency accommodation for young runaways in the UK and provides positive outcomes for young runaways relating to improved general well‐being, mental health and schooling. The costs of refuge can compare favourably to alternative specialised accommodation and support and prevent other costs relating to future episodes of running away, future offending, substance misuse and youth homelessness.

Practical implications

Evidence‐based learning has identified best practice in the commissioning of emergency accommodation related to a number of issues including: scoping activity; the commissioning process; costs; approaches to funding; effective future commissioning of emergency accommodation; why the third sector is best placed to deliver emergency accommodation; and ensuring key elements of service delivery are included to meet children and young people's need and achieve positive outcomes.

Originality/value

The commissioning of emergency accommodation for young runaways has received little attention in research; this paper goes some way to rectifying this omission alongside providing evidence‐based learning for commissioners and service delivery organisations.

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Tina Moules

The case for involving the users of health services in the NHS decision‐making process is clearly identified in a range of Government policy and guidance documents. A…

Abstract

The case for involving the users of health services in the NHS decision‐making process is clearly identified in a range of Government policy and guidance documents. A gradual shift from seeing users as passive recipients of care to active consumers of care has led to a belief that the opinions and views of users must be heard in particular in relation to clinical audit. Alongside this shift is the increasing recognition that the views of children and young people should be sought in decisions which affect their lives. Highlights the case for involving children and young people in clinical audit. Examines the background to user involvement in general, reviews the arguments for involving children and young people and identifies some of the barriers to that involvement. Introduces briefly new research being carried out with children and young people to explore ways of involving them in clinical audit.

Details

British Journal of Clinical Governance, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-4100

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Article
Publication date: 8 December 2010

Lisa Rippon

Children and young people with an intellectual disability (referred to in this article as young people) have a higher incidence of mental illness and challenging behaviour…

Abstract

Children and young people with an intellectual disability (referred to in this article as young people) have a higher incidence of mental illness and challenging behaviour than individuals without cognitive impairment. Inpatient assessment and treatment in a learning disability‐specific provision rather than mainstream inpatient child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) is most beneficial for those young people who experience a more severe intellectual disability or whose presenting complaint is challenging behaviour not associated with a co‐morbid mental illness. Assessment and treatment of this complex group of young people can only be successful if the services which manage them have access to a highly experienced and comprehensive multidisciplinary team. Admission is only worthwhile if recommendations that arise from the assessment can be transferred to the community and those involved in supporting the young person are motivated to work in collaboration with the inpatient team.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

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Book part
Publication date: 30 December 2004

Farzaneh Moinian

Globalization of the media communications progressed rapidly during the twentieth century thanks to innumerable innovation within information technologies particularly…

Abstract

Globalization of the media communications progressed rapidly during the twentieth century thanks to innumerable innovation within information technologies particularly communications satellites, digitalization and advances in computer technology. Today we can utilize new communication systems that allow a worldwide distribution of messages from one place to another. In the middle of the global development of mass media we can find many children and young people. With their engaging, interactive properties, the new digital media are suggested to have more impact on how children grow and learn, what they value, and ultimately who they become than any other medium that has come before (Montgomery, 2002). New media technology influences the life and culture of young people. What is the nature of the content in it and whose values and judgments does it represent is a fatal question for educational researchers today.

Details

Identity, Agency and Social Institutions in Educational Ethnography
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-297-9

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Book part
Publication date: 24 September 2015

Brian Simpson

The purpose of this paper is to explore the narratives that construct the practice and regulation of ‘sexting’, the sending of sexualised images via text message, when…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the narratives that construct the practice and regulation of ‘sexting’, the sending of sexualised images via text message, when engaged in by young people. The aim of this discussion is to better understand the extent to which those narratives recognise young people’s agency in relation to their sexuality and the role that new media plays in enabling youth to explore their sexual identity.

Methodology

The methodology employed is that of discourse analysis. This approach is used to deconstruct the dominant narrative of sexting contained in the literature, a narrative that constructs it as a problem to be contained and controlled, either through the application of the criminal law or through education and guidance approaches. This paper then investigates an emerging counter narrative that gives greater emphasis to the autonomy rights of youth. A case study involving a Parliamentary Inquiry in one Australian State into sexting is also employed to further this analysis.

Findings

This paper concludes that the dominant narrative remains the strongest influence in the shaping of law and the practice of sexting, but that young people may be better served by the counter narrative that recognises their agency in ways that may empower and grant them more control over their bodies.

Originality/Value

The paper thus provides an alternative approach to developing new law and policy with respect to the regulation of sexting by youth that should be of value to lawmakers and child and youth advocates.

Details

Technology and Youth: Growing Up in a Digital World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-265-8

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Book part
Publication date: 25 September 2020

Deirdre Horgan, Shirley Martin and Catherine Forde

This chapter draws on data from a qualitative study examining the extent to which children and young people age 7 to 17 are able to participate and influence matters…

Abstract

This chapter draws on data from a qualitative study examining the extent to which children and young people age 7 to 17 are able to participate and influence matters affecting them in their home, school, and community. It was commissioned by the Department of Children and Youth Affairs in Ireland to inform the National Strategy on Children and Young People’s Participation in Decision-Making, 2015–2020. Utilising Lundy’s (2007) conceptualisation of Article 12 of the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child and Leonard’s (2016) concept of generagency, this chapter will examine children and young people’s everyday lives and relationships within the home and family in the context of agency and structure.

In the study, home was experienced by children generally as the setting most facilitative of their voice and participation in their everyday lives reflecting research findings that children are more likely to have their initiative and ideas encouraged in the family than in school or their wider communities (Mayall, 1994). Key areas of decision-making included everyday consumption activities such as food, clothes, and pocket money as well as temporal activities including bed-time, leisure, and friends. This concurs with Bjerke (2011) that consumption of various forms is a major field of children’s participation. Positive experiences of participation reported by children and young people involved facilitation by adults whom they respected and with whom they had some rapport. This locates children as relational beings, embedded in multiple overlapping intergenerational processes and highlights the interdependency between children’s participation and their environment (Leonard, 2016; Percy-Smith & Thomas, 2010).

Details

Bringing Children Back into the Family: Relationality, Connectedness and Home
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-197-6

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2021

Christine Cocker, Adi Cooper, Dez Holmes and Fiona Bateman

The purpose of this paper is to set out the similarities and differences between the legal frameworks for safeguarding children and adults. It presents the case for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to set out the similarities and differences between the legal frameworks for safeguarding children and adults. It presents the case for developing a Transitional Safeguarding approach to create an integrated paradigm for safeguarding young people that better meets their developmental needs and better reflects the nature of harms young people face.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws on the key principles of the Children Act 1989 and the Care Act 2014 and discusses their similarities and differences. It then introduces two approaches to safeguarding: Making Safeguarding Personal (MSP); and transitional safeguarding; that can inform safeguarding work with young people. Other legal frameworks that influence safeguarding practices, such as the Mental Capacity Act 2005 and the Human Rights Act 1998, are also discussed.

Findings

Safeguarding practice still operates within a child/adult binary; neither safeguarding system adequately meets the needs of young people. Transitional Safeguarding advocates an approach to working with young people that is relational, developmental and contextual. MSP focuses on the wishes of the person at risk from abuse or neglect and their desired outcomes. This is also central to a Transitional Safeguarding approach, which is participative, evidence informed and promotes equalities, diversity and inclusion.

Practical implications

Building a case for developing MSP for young people means that local partnerships could create the type of service that best meets local needs, whilst ensuring their services are participative and responsive to the specific safeguarding needs of individual young people.

Originality/value

This paper promotes applying the principles of MSP to safeguarding practice with young people. It argues that the differences between the children and adult legislative frameworks are not so great that they would inhibit this approach to safeguarding young people.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2015

Kerry Wade

The purpose of this paper is to explore how, by encouraging all key stakeholders to “play nicely and act maturely” to share responsibility, the author was able to improve…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how, by encouraging all key stakeholders to “play nicely and act maturely” to share responsibility, the author was able to improve outcomes for children reported missing to Gwent Police. The paper shows that sharing responsibility is a critical factor in such collaboration, requiring people and agencies to let go of power that usually interferes with a preparedness to avoid blame, a willingness to enjoy the rewards of success and together manage the risks.

Design/methodology/approach

It offers a viewpoint about identifying the issues and failings of silo working and developing a more creative way of working together to improve outcomes for some of the most vulnerable children and young people. It is informed by close working between colleagues from different agencies and professional disciplines and the lived experience of the author in moving from a social services department to the police service.

Findings

Working with people is always complex, the whole process is vulnerable to and affected by personal interpretations and different value bases, yet vulnerable young people need consistency and boundaries. To improve outcomes, the author has to improve the understanding of individuals’ stories, hear what the young people are saying and create a consistent response by balancing risks with potential for change.

Research limitations/implications

There are no formal research findings as yet, but it draws on research carried out elsewhere and highlights where there is shared learning from listening more attentively to what young people say about their experiences of services, set up to protect and safeguard their interests. The independent counselling offered to young people is a critically different ingredient to consider for the future, harnessing the contribution of the third sector and explores their strategic and operational involvement.

Practical implications

Improved outcomes for and engagement with the young people and their families, reducing the long-term impact on the public purse, while lessening risks and breaking the cycle.

Originality/value

It explores collaboration still in its infancy, but one about which there has been considerable interest UK-wide, illustrating the potential for collaboration and/or integration between agencies that have seldom been comfortable “bedfellows”.

Diben

Dangos sut, trwy annog yr holl randdeiliaid allweddol i ‘chwarae’n dda ac ymddwyn yn aeddfed’ i rannu cyfrifoldeb, roeddem yn gallu gwella canlyniadau ar gyfer plant yr hysbyswyd Heddlu Gwent eu bod ar goll. Nod yr erthygl hon yw dangos bod rhannu cyfrifoldeb yn ffactor hanfodol mewn cydweithrediad o’r fath ac, yn hynny o beth, mae angen i bobl ac asiantaethau gael gwared ar y pŵer a’r rheolaeth sydd fel arfer yn ymyrryd â pharodrwydd i osgoi bai a pharodrwydd i fwynhau gwobrwyon llwyddiant a rheoli risg gyda’n gilydd. Methodoleg - Mae’n cynnig safbwynt yn ymwneud â nodi materion a methiannau’r ‘hen ffordd’ silo o weithio a datblygu ffordd arloesol a mwy creadigol o weithio gyda’n gilydd i wella canlyniadau ar gyfer rhai o’r plant a’r bobl ifanc mwyaf agored i niwed. Caiff y safbwynt hwn ei lywio gan gydweithio agos rhwng cydweithwyr o asiantaethau gwahanol gyda disgyblaethau proffesiynol a chefndiroedd gwahanol a phrofiad ymarferol yr awdur yn symud o adran gwasanaethau cymdeithasol i weithio yng ngwasanaeth yr heddlu.

Canfyddiadau

Mae gweithio gyda phobl yn gymhleth, gall y broses gyfan gael ei heffeithio gan ddehongliadau personol a gwerthoedd gwahanol, ond eto mae angen cysondeb a ffiniau ar bobl ifanc agored i niwed. Er mwyn gwella canlyniadau, mae’n rhaid i ni wella ein dealltwriaeth o straeon unigolion, clywed yr hyn y mae pobl ifanc yn ei ddweud a chreu ymateb cyson trwy gydbwyso’r peryglon gyda photensial ar gyfer newid.

Cyfyngiadau/goblygiadau ymchwil

nid oes unrhyw ganfyddiadau ymchwil ffurfiol ar y prosiect eto, ond bydd yr erthygl yn defnyddio ymchwil a wnaed rhywle arall ac yn amlygu dysgu a rennir wrth wrando’n fwy astud ar yr hyn y mae pobl ifanc yn ei ddweud am eu profiad o wasanaethau, sydd wedi eu sefydlu i amddiffyn a diogelu eu buddiannau. Gall natur annibynnol y cwnsela sy’n cael ei gynnig i bobl ifanc fod yn elfen hanfodol wahanol i’w hystyried ar gyfer y dyfodol ac mae’n defnyddio cyfraniad y trydydd sector ac yn archwilio eu cyfranogiad strategol a gweithredol.

Goblygiadau ymarferol

Canlyniadau gwella ar gyfer pobl ifanc a’u teuluoedd ac ar gyfer eu hymgysylltu, gan leihau’r effaith hirdymor ar gyllid cyhoeddus, tra’n lleihau’r peryglon ac yn torri’r cylch.

Gwreiddioldeb/gwerth

Mae’r erthygl hon yn archwilio cydweithrediaeth sy’n dal mewn cyfnod cynnar, ond yn un y mae diddordeb sylweddol wedi bod ynddi ar draws y DU ac mae’n dangos y potensial ar gyfer cydweithredu a/neu integreiddio rhwng asiantaethau sydd heb fod yn gyfforddus iawn yn gweithio mewn ‘partneriaeth’.

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1999

Henrietta L. Moore

This paper summarises and updates the report of one of the seven Expert Working Groups established by the UK’s Health Education Authority (HEA) in October 1996 to look at…

Abstract

This paper summarises and updates the report of one of the seven Expert Working Groups established by the UK’s Health Education Authority (HEA) in October 1996 to look at the potential for health promotion with key populations – in this case that of children and young people. It seeks to establish a revitalised agenda for research into the health and wellbeing of children and young people in the UK. The article describes how contemporary sociological understandings of children and childhood have implications not only for the way in which health and health promotion strategies are conceived, designed and implemented, but for our understanding of what health and health promotion initiatives should constitute. The article calls for more research into children’s and young people’s understandings of health, and the linguistic idioms in which those understandings are expressed, as well as into the social networks and social action spaces in which children and young people operate. It argues for better integration of research and policies concerning the health of children and young people, to include institutions, agencies and organisations that have an impact on the health of children and young people.

Details

Health Education, vol. 99 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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