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Article

Jack T. Marchewka and Lynn Neeley

Strategic alliances between academic and corporate partners can provide exceptional benefits and reveal new opportunities for shared value. Benefits and opportunities…

Abstract

Strategic alliances between academic and corporate partners can provide exceptional benefits and reveal new opportunities for shared value. Benefits and opportunities include alternative sources of funding to support academic programs, more effective and efficient matching of students with prospective employers, applied research for faculty, innovative and mutual learning environments, and improved business practices. The focus of this paper will describe how three corporatealliance relationships with Northern Illinois University’s College of Business were initiated and developed. Other schools and companies looking to develop similar relationships may hopefully benefit from the College of Business’s experience. Moreover, corporate and academic alliances provide a potentially rich area of research.

Details

American Journal of Business, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

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Article

Mark Thomas, Patrick O'Sullivan, Martin Zahner and Joelle Silvestre

The purpose of this paper is to describe an innovative international management programme that has been developed across four countries for Master-level students. It first…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe an innovative international management programme that has been developed across four countries for Master-level students. It first analyses the advantages and disadvantages of two of the most common forms of internationalisation in higher education; the student exchange and full-scale offshore campus model. It then shows how one programme at Grenoble Ecole de Management (GEM) has been designed to capture the best parts of both models in the creation of a hybrid, transcontinental programme. This has resulted in the creation of high quality international education for a large number of students whilst further developing a stronger alliance network between faculties and the business community.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper analyses the advantages and disadvantages of two forms of internationalisation. From there, it draws upon a case study of a hybrid programme based on discussions with faculty and students from four internationally accredited business schools in Vancouver, New York, Grenoble and Beijing. It is supplemented with research on the development of international higher education.

Findings

International exchange programmes and offshore international campuses can enrich the learning experience for students. However, there are limitations to both models. A hybrid model, though more complex to develop may have a much deeper impact on student learning and faculty development while also offering graduates a greater number of international employment opportunities. The paper outlines some best practices and preliminary learning outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

The transcontinental project is relatively new being in its third year. Initial results are very positive, but the full implications will be understood in the coming years.

Practical implications

The paper outlines a framework for joint academic programmes overseas. It demonstrates that by assessing the pros and cons of different forms of international development, a third way can be designed to ensure a richer experience for students, faculty and the business community.

Originality/value

The programmes are designed to include a greater number of stakeholders and involve teaching, research and corporate participation. This contrasts with many international ventures in higher education institutions that may deal with only one aspect. The paper gives a clear framework for the creation of such programmes. It will be of value to academics, administrators and directors wishing to innovate in their international development for the benefit of their students and faculty.

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

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Article

Kevin Pon and Anne-Laure Duncan

The purpose of this paper is to examine the state of French medium sized business schools in the Grandes Ecole sector of education and how networks and alliances help…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the state of French medium sized business schools in the Grandes Ecole sector of education and how networks and alliances help business schools survive in an ever-changing and global environment.

Design/methodology/approach

The material for empirical research for this paper was gathered by using a case study method of four small to medium sized provincial Institutions of Management Education in France.

Findings

The paper demonstrates that all of the business schools studied rely on networks and alliances to face globalisation and internationalise their strategy and seems to follow the three typologies of mergers and acquisitions set down by Napier (1989): extension mergers, collaborative mergers and redesign mergers. At present, the networks and alliances are used on a marginal or peripheral way by networking only a part of the institution at one time.

Research limitations/implications

Further research at a later date needs to be carried out in order to observe if the pattern will remain or if there may be networks which will start from the core of the institution since the organisations will in the future have more of an international or global culture.

Originality/value

The value of this paper is to demonstrate that medium-sized business schools can compensate their limited resources and compete in the global education market. Alliances and networks appear as key ways in achieving goals of sustainability and survival.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 38 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article

Mayoor Mohan, Kevin E. Voss, Fernando R. Jiménez and Bashar S. Gammoh

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of the corporate brand in a brand alliance that includes one of the corporation’s product brands.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of the corporate brand in a brand alliance that includes one of the corporation’s product brands.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a scenario-based study, 899 participants were randomly assigned to one of 84 unique brand alliance scenarios involving a corporate brand, a product brand ally and a focal product brand; a total of 33 corporate brands were represented. Results were estimated using a three-stage least squares model.

Findings

Consumers’ evaluations of a focal brand were enhanced when a corporate brand name associated with a product brand ally was included in the brand alliance. The effect was mediated by attitude toward the product brand ally. The indirect effect of the corporate brand was stronger when consumers had low product category knowledge (PCK).

Research limitations/implications

Consistent with competitive cue theory, the findings suggest that a corporate brand can provide superior, consistent and unique information in a brand alliance.

Practical implications

Practitioners should note that the effectiveness of adding a corporate brand name into a product brand alliance is contingent on the extent of consumers’ PCK.

Originality/value

This paper examines when and why corporate brands are effective endorsers in product brand alliances. This paper adds empirical support to previous assertions that, if managed effectively, corporate brands can be valuable assets that convey unique valuable information to consumers.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-12024-617-5

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Book part

Morgan R. Clevenger, Cynthia J. MacGregor and C.J. Ryan

This chapter considers how higher education has enticed and interacted with corporations. This chapter explores how higher education behaves, in the aggregate, with a set…

Abstract

This chapter considers how higher education has enticed and interacted with corporations. This chapter explores how higher education behaves, in the aggregate, with a set of external partners, including businesses. It concludes with a discussion of how higher education should behave, given its external partners, in the modern context in which it finds itself. Discussion topics in this chapter include expectations of external partners; tactics to attract and retain business engagement and support; and internal organization by higher education to address corporate relations, ethics, and effective strategic planning. The Network of Academic Corporate Relations Officers' (NACRO) ideas and models are discussed. A set of guiding principles focused on Strategic Corporate Alliances by the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) is highlighted.

Details

Business and Corporation Engagement with Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-656-1

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Article

Georgios I. Zekos

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination…

Abstract

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination of some legal aspects concerning MNEs, cyberspace and e‐commerce as the means of expression of the digital economy. The whole effort of the author is focused on the examination of various aspects of MNEs and their impact upon globalisation and vice versa and how and if we are moving towards a global digital economy.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 45 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article

Richard Dealtry

This article aims to take a further step forward in examining those important business factors that will shape the future of best practice in the quality management of…

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to take a further step forward in examining those important business factors that will shape the future of best practice in the quality management of internal and external strategic alliances.

Design/methodology/approach

The article presents a speculative scenario on the future of strategic alliances in education, training, development and business, inspired learning by applying information and data from well‐established professional alliance management sources as the underpinning context for its guidelines.

Findings

Many different attempts have been and still are being made by business and academic institutions to set up working relationships that are intended to work well for both parties. These relationships travel under various titles, with the term “partnership” being the most common. Problems of sustainability and/or quality of outcomes are prevalent as a result of the alliance management perspective being taken on a limited understanding of the total relationship dynamics for success; too narrow a perspective on what dynamics have to be managed. Models for success are, however, readily available.

Research limitations/implications

In the broader context there is a wealth of research, best practice and practical experience in the field of strategic alliance management. iPCo's current research is therefore focused on how this professional resource and experience can be adopted to provide a quality framework of management practice that will enable business management to ensure that they make the right choices in the selection and construction of their strategic learning relationships both internally and externally.

Originality/value

The need for major innovations in the management of lifelong training and learning is now well established. Trying to achieve the successful implementation of these developments on a piecemeal basis has, however, proved to be an unrewarding process for many managers. The inertia of large institutional bodies and the “not invented here” syndrome have been proved to slow down or sideline major innovations. Knowing the size of the problem in each situation and how to deal with it effectively and efficiently at the right level is now one of the main strategic imperatives for corporate university managers.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

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Article

Dean Elmuti, Michael Abebe and Marco Nicolosi

Strategic alliances generally represent inter‐firm cooperative agreements aimed at achieving competitive advantage for the partners. In recent years, there has a dramatic…

Abstract

Purpose

Strategic alliances generally represent inter‐firm cooperative agreements aimed at achieving competitive advantage for the partners. In recent years, there has a dramatic increase in strategic alliances by multinational firms.This paper aims to explore the essence of these alliances and why they have become such a growing area of research in business in recent years.

Design/methodology/approach

Discusses strategic alliances between corporations and institutions of higher education. The major underlying motives for creating these alliances and the critical success factors are also discussed. The paper also analyzes the success stories.

Findings

Highlights the major advantages for the academic community – research funding and practical learning opportunities for students – and for industry – lower research and development costs and technology transfer opportunities that affect competitiveness. The drawbacks may include the partners’ different working cultures and values. Finds that alliances must be supported by continuous learning and restructuring processes to overcome the differences.

Originality/value

Extracts the valuable lessons that might help others to effectively utilize strategic alliances between corporations and institutions of higher education.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 17 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article

Stephen M. Wigley and Aikaterini‐Konstantina Provelengiou

The purpose of this paper is to investigate market‐facing fashion industry strategic alliances in the fashion industry by studying a specific case in context of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate market‐facing fashion industry strategic alliances in the fashion industry by studying a specific case in context of the existing literature. It has three key objectives: to explore the motives causing strategic alliance formation in the fashion industry; to understand the processes involved in the creation and management of such an alliance, and to identify factors defining the success of the alliance.

Design/methodology/approach

Case study methodology was employed studying an instance of market‐facing strategic alliance in the fashion sector.

Findings

It was found that while issues generic within the literature may be discerned in instances of strategic alliance in the fashion industry, industry‐specific factors, especially competence in marketing, branding and retailing, impact on the motives for alliance, partner selection and alliance implementation and alliance.

Research limitations/implications

The usual limitations of any case study apply.

Practical implications

The paper provides an account of the motives for processes affecting and outcomes of strategic alliance in the fashion industry and promoting student, academic and practitioner understanding of the topic. The paper also provides a model for the management of such an alliance.

Originality/value

The paper offers insights into a contemporary phenomenon of interest to both practitioners and academics and provides detail on the motives and processes contingent to the successful management of strategic alliances within the fashion sector.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

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