Search results

1 – 10 of over 22000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

G.Tomas M. Hult and Elvin C. Lashbrooke

With the advent of the global economy and marketplace, cultural sensitivity and language proficiency have assumed new, higher levels of importance in business education…

Abstract

With the advent of the global economy and marketplace, cultural sensitivity and language proficiency have assumed new, higher levels of importance in business education. Consequently, business schools need to acclimate both faculty and students to the global environment. Study abroad is an effective way to accomplish internationalization of faculty and students; however, there are many challenges relating to study abroad that need to be resolved. The underlying rationale for study abroad is evolving, as are the anticipated outcomes for students studying abroad. Moreover, there is no single source of information about study abroad and best practices relating to study abroad. Formal assessment of study abroad programs is rarely undertaken in the belief that the value of study abroad is self-evident; therefore, assessment is not critical. Consequently, study abroad is a topic on which much more research is needed. There are great opportunities for scholars and practitioners in the field of study abroad to do research in the different aspects of study abroad and disseminate and publish the results. The educational opportunities are virtually unlimited, as the importance of study abroad as a response to training business and other students to be able to function effectively in the global economy increases.

Details

Study Abroad
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-192-7

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

John C. Niser

The purpose of this paper is to develop relevant questions for research by gaining an initial understanding of how the field of study abroad education is organizing itself…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop relevant questions for research by gaining an initial understanding of how the field of study abroad education is organizing itself within institutions of higher education. The context is the growing numbers of students, demands, and expectations made on study abroad programs.

Design/methodology/approach

The survey was carried out by analyzing publicly available data and information, as it would be available to students, of all the accredited institutions of higher education within the six states of New England.

Findings

The findings confirm that albeit for Community Colleges, the vast majority of institutions offer study abroad programs. However, this survey also reveals the important role providers are playing in offering generic programs to students from multiple institutions.

Research limitations/implications

The findings call for further investigation into institutional strategies concerning the choice of programs, particularly those involving providers who potentially imply losing tuition and control over educational outcomes. Limitations are discussed suggesting the need to widen the geographical area studied as well as analyzing in more detail the Community College offerings that are not easily accessible with the methodology that has been used in this paper. The findings also raise some questions and future avenues of research particularly in the area of examining the integration of generic study abroad programs within particular institutional and programmatic objectives. It is also suggested that further research is needed to better evaluate if/how study abroad programs are designed to capitalize on the employability advantage they offer to participating students when they enter the job market.

Originality/value

The number of US students participating in study abroad programs is expected to continue to grow and it seems these programs will become part of mainstream offerings in most institutions. Similar trends are observed in Europe between member states. Besides giving a broad overview of the current offerings, this pilot study principally reveals several important avenues for future research that should help institutions in their choices of programs and the orientation they give to study abroad.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Jonathan Rees and John Klapper

This chapter highlights the growing body of international research into the benefits of residence abroad for foreign language students, surveying studies from the past 35…

Abstract

This chapter highlights the growing body of international research into the benefits of residence abroad for foreign language students, surveying studies from the past 35 years originating in both the U.S.A. and the U.K. It examines some of the problematic issues confronting researchers in this area and shows how these issues have contributed to a paucity of studies in the area and led to a diversity in research design. It reports on longitudinal study, the first of its kind in the U.K., which examined the linguistic benefits of residence abroad for a cohort of modern language students from a leading university. This 4-year study used repeated measures proficiency testing, involving a C-test, a grammar test and a range of qualitative measures, to chart the progress made by students on 6- and 12-month study placements in Germany. Findings confirm substantial proficiency gains on both of the main measures but fail to confirm gender and length of residence abroad as predictors of progress. Results also reveal strong differential individual performance during residence abroad. The chapter concludes with recommendations for future research aimed at exploring this key finding further.

Details

International Relations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-244-3

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Kati Bell

US universities are increasingly addressing issues of equity and social justice through global learning programs with international partners. Growing numbers of…

Abstract

US universities are increasingly addressing issues of equity and social justice through global learning programs with international partners. Growing numbers of universities now prioritize the development and implementation of international programs such as study abroad, and service learning to fulfill components of missions and visions focused on educating global citizens. This chapter discusses how global citizenship goals intersect with social justice education through global learning programs such as study abroad and global service learning. It also describes the conceptual frameworks that inform teaching and learning in this domain and highlights current examples of partnerships and overseas institutions that focus on goals of social justice and developing the global citizen. Finally, this chapter will discuss future challenges for US universities in further developing international partnerships for social justice.

Details

University Partnerships for International Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-301-6

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Cindy B. Damschroder

This chapter focuses on the University of Cincinnati (UC), named by the 2016 Princeton Review as one of the “Nation’s Best” institutions for undergraduate education…

Abstract

This chapter focuses on the University of Cincinnati (UC), named by the 2016 Princeton Review as one of the “Nation’s Best” institutions for undergraduate education (Robinette, T., 2015, August 4. UC continues streak of recognition as one of nation’s best universities. Retrieved from http://www.uc.edu/news/nr.aspx?id=22016), and their commitment to growing international experiential learning opportunities for its student population in accordance with strategic plans and focused administrative goals. One department identified by UC for strategic growth of international experiential learning opportunities is the Division of Experience-Based Learning and Career Education. An International Experiential Learning Committee (IELC) was formed to help study, crystallize, and move forward these university initiatives.

Details

University Partnerships for International Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-301-6

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Stephanie L. Quirk and James “Gus” Gustafson

A study of community college students enrolled in a for-credit study abroad program in Costa Rica sought to identify the experiences that influence intercultural…

Abstract

A study of community college students enrolled in a for-credit study abroad program in Costa Rica sought to identify the experiences that influence intercultural competency growth during study abroad trips and to learn how the experiences influence the development of global leadership competencies. The results led to a modified global leadership development expertise model for understanding the process of global leadership development in student populations. The study revealed a key link between antecedent characteristics of participants and their transformational ability during the study. The study also revealed that there are types of transformational experiences that, when experienced sequentially, can maximize transformational potential and the development of intercultural competencies.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Scott L. Thomas and Mary E. McMahon

This paper considers the relationship between admissions criteria and subsequent academic performance in a university‐level special study program, using the example of…

Abstract

This paper considers the relationship between admissions criteria and subsequent academic performance in a university‐level special study program, using the example of study abroad. The University of California Education Abroad Program (EAP), perhaps the largest single study abroad entity, provides the data and institutional setting for this study. Based on a study of nearly 1,600 students over a five‐year period, we describe student characteristics associated with participation, with special attention to diversity issues; we explore factors associated with academic performance abroad; we investigate minimum academic qualifications associated with academic “success” in the study program. Findings show marked variations in the demographic characteristics of students participating in the program and that students’ pre‐departure academic performance and foreign language proficiency are positively related to academic performance abroad. It is also shown that some students admitted to the program by exception do perform at equivalent levels.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Content available
Article

Kelly George and Aaron Clevenger

At Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, an annual short-term, research abroad non-credit program was created in 2012 as a core component of the undergraduate research…

Abstract

Purpose

At Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, an annual short-term, research abroad non-credit program was created in 2012 as a core component of the undergraduate research initiative that achieves learning outcomes in a meaningful way. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to describe, and analyze the short-term research abroad activity, an instrumental case study design was created. The instrumental case study was chosen as a means of allowing the facilitators/authors to communicate how they attempted to assure that the program was educative. In order to determine if the program was in fact educative and that it met its goal of being an effective research experience the authors utilized two additional research methods. The first was a document analysis of the participant’s research artifacts. Each participant was required to communicate their findings by writing a paper that was submitted for publication to an applicable research journal.

Findings

The study found that an experiential education as a pedagogical framework coupled with a short-term research abroad activity can lead to a substantive educative experience, where the authors described and analyzed attempts to ensure that the short-term research abroad program was educative, it also describes the educational assessment findings which describe what was found when the authors tested whether they, in fact, met this goal.

Research limitations/implications

During the design phase of the short-term research abroad program, the authors turned to experiential education as a principle for how they would ensure that the program was grounded in an acceptable educational theory. Experiential education is a widely accepted educational practice used in experiences such as co-ops and internships, study abroad, undergraduate research and service learning.

Practical implications

To frame the short-term cultural research abroad program as something from which student could learn the authors utilized the National Society of Experiential Education’s (2013) list of eight principles of good practice. In order to safeguard that an activity is educative, an assessment or an evaluation of a demonstrative artifact is essential. In assessing the final artifact against a rubric or some other non-biased or less biased criteria, an educator can ensure that the student has gained new knowledge in the form of student learning outcomes (SLOs). In addition, the educator can use the results of this assessment to modify many different aspects of the experience ranging from the timing, the modality, the pre-work, even the learning outcomes themselves.

Social implications

Given financial and curriculum inflexibility of some students, Universities and faculty could achieve attainment of research-based, program agnostic, SLOs by offering short-term study abroad alternatives to the traditional semester or year-long experiences. With graduates looking to enter the job market where businesses are more globalized and executive’s recognition of a need for more international experience, carefully constructed short-term study abroad programs are meaningful avenues to build those credentials.

Originality/value

Such offerings can be constructed as customized experiences to achieve highly integrated skills across all degree programs.

Details

Journal of Research in Innovative Teaching & Learning, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2397-7604

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Jacek Liwiński

The purpose of this paper is to identify the impact of international student mobility (ISM) on the first wages of tertiary education graduates in Poland.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the impact of international student mobility (ISM) on the first wages of tertiary education graduates in Poland.

Design/methodology/approach

The author uses data from the nationwide tracer survey of Polish graduates (2007 Graduate Tracer Study) and regresses the hourly net wage rate of salaried workers in their first job after graduating from a higher education institution on a rich set of individual characteristics. In order to reduce the bias due to selection to ISM, the author includes a set of variables representing abilities and skills, characteristics of studies, and international experience as control variables. The author addresses the possible selection to employment bias by using the Heckman correction.

Findings

After controlling for observed heterogeneity, the author finds that Polish graduates who studied abroad for at least one month earn on average 22 per cent more in their first job than those who studied in Poland only. However, the author also finds that this wage premium is explained by international economic migration after graduation. Studying abroad brings a wage premium only if it is followed by working abroad. Those who perform their first job in Poland do not obtain any wage premium from ISM.

Originality/value

The main contribution of the paper is that it identifies international economic migration after graduation as another mechanism explaining why those who studied abroad earn more.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 40 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Rose Opengart

The purpose of this study was to analyze the journal entries of study abroad students from a college of business that participated in four separate nine-day study abroad

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to analyze the journal entries of study abroad students from a college of business that participated in four separate nine-day study abroad programs to identify whether the development of intercultural maturity is possible in a short-term study abroad program and if learning and development differ based on race/cultural background.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used content analysis of student journals. The journal entries of 33 students from four different short-term study abroad trips served as the data from which a qualitative content analysis using nvivo was conducted.

Findings

Development of intercultural maturity can, in fact, occur from a short-term (10-day) study abroad program. Student development progressed through the first two levels of the Intercultural Maturity Framework, with multicultural students progressing further. All students achieved first and second levels of the Developmental Trajectory of Intercultural Maturity on the King and Baxter Magolda (2005) framework in all three areas, including cognitive, intrapersonal and interpersonal.

Research limitations/implications

The author realizes the limitations of one form of data, the journal, and thus proposes for the future both pre-travel questions to encourage further critical thinking and learning and additional methods of obtaining data.

Practical implications

This study suggests that it might be advantageous to re-design the experience, whereby the students are guided with particular questions before or at the start of the study abroad program, to propel them forward in the process of critical reflection and development of intercultural maturity.

Originality/value

This study specifically applies the framework of King and Baxter Magolda’s (2005) Intercultural Maturity framework to examine the extent to which intercultural maturity of business students can be developed within the constraints of a short-term (nine-day) study abroad program. It also adds the dimension of comparing multicultural student development to non-multicultural student development.

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 22000