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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

John Saunders and Fu Guoqun

The deference towards brands that motivated yesterday’s consumers to purchase is no longer so evident in today’s shopping environment. As consumers become more…

4165

Abstract

The deference towards brands that motivated yesterday’s consumers to purchase is no longer so evident in today’s shopping environment. As consumers become more sophisticated in their assessment of brands and more demanding in their requirements, brand management will need to develop more substantive market models to regain the initiative. Outlines an empirical model of brand loyalty that provides diagnostic data to support the management of brand loyal behaviour and customer equity in grocery markets.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 14 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1998

Subodh Bhat, Gail E. Kelley and Kathleen A. O’Donnell

We examined consumer reactions to new products introduced under four different brand naming scenarios. The results suggest that when consumers see a high degree of fit…

6218

Abstract

We examined consumer reactions to new products introduced under four different brand naming scenarios. The results suggest that when consumers see a high degree of fit between the new product and the existing brand, brand extensions, sub‐brands, and nested brands are about equally preferred. But when consumers perceive little fit, a new brand name is the most preferred, followed by nested brands, sub‐brands, and extensions, in that order.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1995

L. W. Turley and Patrick A. Moore

Although research associated with branding′s influence on consumerbehavior has increased in recent years, the vast majority of this workhas focussed on tangible goods…

9051

Abstract

Although research associated with branding′s influence on consumer behavior has increased in recent years, the vast majority of this work has focussed on tangible goods rather than intangible services. Focusses on branding and brand name strategies for intangible services. Develops a classification system for service brand names and describes a study which explores the degree to which these diverse strategies are used by different types of services.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1988

David Shipley, Graham J. Hooley and Simon Wallace

The key benefits resulting from the development of effective brand names by firms operating in fiercely competitive food markets are outlined and the paucity of relevant…

Abstract

The key benefits resulting from the development of effective brand names by firms operating in fiercely competitive food markets are outlined and the paucity of relevant research is noted. This article provides a managerially applicable model of brand name development and presents findings on this subject recently gathered in a survey of food manufacturers.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 90 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1988

Tom Blackett

The name is at the core of a brand's personality, symbolising the sum of the attributes that make up the brand and quickly become synonymous with the satisfactions that…

1421

Abstract

The name is at the core of a brand's personality, symbolising the sum of the attributes that make up the brand and quickly become synonymous with the satisfactions that the brand delivers. In view of this, it seems ironic that the name is frequently the one element of the brand which, prior to launch, attracts the least expenditure and often the most superficial research. Whether this is due to ignorance or indifference is not known. Very little good brand name research is done, not for lack of technique, more for lack of a true appreciation of the role that the brand name plays. The function of the brand name and how to conduct brand name research are described.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1988

John Murphy

Brands are important and valuable assets which are frequently underacknowledged and misunderstood. The processes of new‐brand development and of brand management are…

7627

Abstract

Brands are important and valuable assets which are frequently underacknowledged and misunderstood. The processes of new‐brand development and of brand management are similarly mysterious. This is not to say that certain important components of the branding process — for example, design, market research, advertising — are inadequately developed or unprofessional. Rather, that integrating these particular areas of expertise into a systematic and coherent approach to branding frequently relies mainly on intuition. Furthermore, certain key parts of the branding process — for instance, brandname development — have generally in the past been tackled haphazardly and, at times, illogically. The author's view of what branding is all about is presented and the role of one vital component in a brand's personality — the brand name or trademark — is discussed.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 October 2022

Sunny Vijay Arora, Arti D. Kalro and Dinesh Sharma

Managers prefer semantic imbeds in brand names, but extant literature has primarily studied fictitious names for their sound-symbolic perceptions. This paper aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

Managers prefer semantic imbeds in brand names, but extant literature has primarily studied fictitious names for their sound-symbolic perceptions. This paper aims to explore sound-symbolic perceptions of products with blended brand names (BBNs), formed with at least one semantic and one nonsemantic component. Unlike most extant literature, this study not only estimates the effect of vowels and consonants individually on product perceptions but also of their combinations. The boundary condition for this effect is examined by classifying products by their categorization and attributes by their abstractness.

Design/methodology/approach

Through a within-subject experiment, this paper tested perceptions of products with BBNs having high-/low-frequency sounds. A mixed-design experiment followed with sound frequency, product-level categorization and attributes’ abstractness as predictor variables.

Findings

For BBNs, vowel sounds convey brand meaning better than the combinations of vowel and consonant sounds – and these convey brand meaning better than consonant sounds. Differences in consumers’ perceptions of products with BBNs occur when the degree of attributes’ abstractness matches product-level categorization, such as when concrete attributes match subordinate-level categorization.

Practical implications

Brand managers/strategists can communicate product positioning (attribute-based) through BBNs created specifically for product categories and product types.

Originality/value

This research presents a comparative analysis across vowels, consonants and their combinations on consumers’ perceptions of products with BBNs. Manipulation of names’ length and position of the sound-symbolic imbed in the BBN proffered additional contributions. Another novelty is the interaction effect of product categorization levels and attributes’ abstractness on sound-symbolic perception.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 January 2022

Marzanna Katarzyna Witek-Hajduk and Anna Grudecka

This study aims to investigate how brand name (home-emerging-country vs foreign-developed-country brand name) applied by emerging market company in conjunction with…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate how brand name (home-emerging-country vs foreign-developed-country brand name) applied by emerging market company in conjunction with revealing the actual country-of-brand-origin (COBO) (revealed vs non-revealed origin from developed vs emerging country) affects purchase intensions of durable goods.

Design/methodology/approach

An experimental conjoint analysis and multilevel linear models were applied.

Findings

Results demonstrate that brand name differentiates consumers’ purchase intentions. However, not every foreign-developed-country brand name may lead to the increase of purchase intentions. Revealing the actual emerging market’s COBO for brands with developed-country brand name may lead to lowering purchase intentions. Moreover, consumer ethnocentrism and materialism moderate the relationship between the brand type in terms of brand name and purchase intentions.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the international marketing literature by simultaneous examination of the impact of brand name type and revealing actual COBO on purchase intentions and the moderating effects of ethnocentrism and materialism, in emerging markets’ context. It also offers novel insights for brand managers regarding the influence of emerging markets’ companies branding strategies on consumer purchase intentions.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 9 July 2021

Pablo Farías and Luis Torres

This paper explores which market and product category characteristics could influence the use of foreign language brand names (i.e. whether a brand uses a foreign language…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper explores which market and product category characteristics could influence the use of foreign language brand names (i.e. whether a brand uses a foreign language versus local language brand name) in some of the largest Latin American countries.

Design/methodology/approach

Hypotheses are tested using 880 brands from 39 product categories and nine Latin American markets using a hierarchical logistic regression.

Findings

Results revealed that foreign language brand names are more likely to be used in product categories related to local infrastructure, high-tech and global community. In contrast, local language brand names are more likely to be used in product categories associated to subscriptions. Findings also suggest that Hofstede's national cultural dimensions are significant factors. Finally, the results revealed that foreign language brand names are more likely to be used in markets with a low level of foreign language proficiency.

Originality/value

This paper shows the importance of considering market and product category characteristics and their potential influence on local versus foreign language branding in Latin America – an ignored issue in previous research.

Article
Publication date: 20 April 2015

Luke Kachersky and Marina Carnevale

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relative effectiveness of the second-person pronoun perspective within a brand name (as in “You”Tube) and the first-person…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relative effectiveness of the second-person pronoun perspective within a brand name (as in “You”Tube) and the first-person pronoun perspective (as in “i”Phone).

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on prior research on self-concept, general pronoun usage and the fit between branding tactics and positioning, it is predicted that “you” will garner more favorable consumer responses when the brand is positioned on social benefits, while “I” will garner more favorable responses when the brand is positioned on personal benefits. These predictions are tested in two experiments with US consumers.

Findings

When the brand in the experiment was positioned for its social benefits, “you” elicited more favorable brand attitudes than “I”, while the opposite was true when the brand was positioned for its personal benefits. This effect tends to be stronger among those with higher self-esteem.

Practical implications

Managers can make more informed pronoun brand name selections based on their brand’s intended positioning – if it is social, “you” should be used; if it is personal, “I” should be used.

Originality/value

The influence of pronouns in brand names is still largely unexplored. This research is the first to examine “you” brand names and also sheds light on how another marketing variable – positioning – impacts consumer preference for pronoun brand names. Finally, this work shows that such effects are more pronounced for those with higher self-esteem.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

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