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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

John Saunders and Fu Guoqun

The deference towards brands that motivated yesterday’s consumers to purchase is no longer so evident in today’s shopping environment. As consumers become more…

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4067

Abstract

The deference towards brands that motivated yesterday’s consumers to purchase is no longer so evident in today’s shopping environment. As consumers become more sophisticated in their assessment of brands and more demanding in their requirements, brand management will need to develop more substantive market models to regain the initiative. Outlines an empirical model of brand loyalty that provides diagnostic data to support the management of brand loyal behaviour and customer equity in grocery markets.

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Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 14 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1998

Subodh Bhat, Gail E. Kelley and Kathleen A. O’Donnell

We examined consumer reactions to new products introduced under four different brand naming scenarios. The results suggest that when consumers see a high degree of fit…

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6118

Abstract

We examined consumer reactions to new products introduced under four different brand naming scenarios. The results suggest that when consumers see a high degree of fit between the new product and the existing brand, brand extensions, sub‐brands, and nested brands are about equally preferred. But when consumers perceive little fit, a new brand name is the most preferred, followed by nested brands, sub‐brands, and extensions, in that order.

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Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1995

L. W. Turley and Patrick A. Moore

Although research associated with branding′s influence on consumerbehavior has increased in recent years, the vast majority of this workhas focussed on tangible goods…

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8705

Abstract

Although research associated with branding′s influence on consumer behavior has increased in recent years, the vast majority of this work has focussed on tangible goods rather than intangible services. Focusses on branding and brand name strategies for intangible services. Develops a classification system for service brand names and describes a study which explores the degree to which these diverse strategies are used by different types of services.

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Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1988

David Shipley, Graham J. Hooley and Simon Wallace

The key benefits resulting from the development of effective brand names by firms operating in fiercely competitive food markets are outlined and the paucity of relevant…

Abstract

The key benefits resulting from the development of effective brand names by firms operating in fiercely competitive food markets are outlined and the paucity of relevant research is noted. This article provides a managerially applicable model of brand name development and presents findings on this subject recently gathered in a survey of food manufacturers.

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British Food Journal, vol. 90 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1988

Tom Blackett

The name is at the core of a brand's personality, symbolising the sum of the attributes that make up the brand and quickly become synonymous with the satisfactions that…

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1370

Abstract

The name is at the core of a brand's personality, symbolising the sum of the attributes that make up the brand and quickly become synonymous with the satisfactions that the brand delivers. In view of this, it seems ironic that the name is frequently the one element of the brand which, prior to launch, attracts the least expenditure and often the most superficial research. Whether this is due to ignorance or indifference is not known. Very little good brand name research is done, not for lack of technique, more for lack of a true appreciation of the role that the brand name plays. The function of the brand name and how to conduct brand name research are described.

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Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1988

John Murphy

Brands are important and valuable assets which are frequently underacknowledged and misunderstood. The processes of new‐brand development and of brand management are…

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7140

Abstract

Brands are important and valuable assets which are frequently underacknowledged and misunderstood. The processes of new‐brand development and of brand management are similarly mysterious. This is not to say that certain important components of the branding process — for example, design, market research, advertising — are inadequately developed or unprofessional. Rather, that integrating these particular areas of expertise into a systematic and coherent approach to branding frequently relies mainly on intuition. Furthermore, certain key parts of the branding process — for instance, brandname development — have generally in the past been tackled haphazardly and, at times, illogically. The author's view of what branding is all about is presented and the role of one vital component in a brand's personality — the brand name or trademark — is discussed.

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Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 17 July 2009

Herbert Jack Rotfeld

This paper aims to discuss the problems faced by US consumers as insurance companies use brand names as a heuristic tool to identify medical profligacy, penalizing…

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1127

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss the problems faced by US consumers as insurance companies use brand names as a heuristic tool to identify medical profligacy, penalizing consumers with higher co‐payments or even refusing funding support for new and necessary medications.

Design/method/approach

Anecdotes and descriptive reviews of the literature describe the basis for the problem. The paper looks at the use of brand names in the pharmaceutical industry in comparison with generic versions. It gives a brief history of brand name development.

Findings

The paper finds that, for the pharmaceutical companies, or any company, a brand name allows them to escape from the confines of generic demand with the price and distribution power from brand demand. Furthermore the easier name can speed adoption of a new product. However, the price spread between new brand name drugs and older ones with non‐branded competition gives rise to unfounded presumptions on all brand names.

Practical implications

Brand names can have value for both consumers and physicians, but it might be desirable for the US health care system to put an end to a brand's exclusive use beyond the innovation's patent protection.

Originality/value

The paper provides concluding recommendations of a broad regulatory solution that pharmaceutical companies would probably oppose.

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Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 9 July 2021

Pablo Farías and Luis Torres

This paper explores which market and product category characteristics could influence the use of foreign language brand names (i.e. whether a brand uses a foreign language…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper explores which market and product category characteristics could influence the use of foreign language brand names (i.e. whether a brand uses a foreign language versus local language brand name) in some of the largest Latin American countries.

Design/methodology/approach

Hypotheses are tested using 880 brands from 39 product categories and nine Latin American markets using a hierarchical logistic regression.

Findings

Results revealed that foreign language brand names are more likely to be used in product categories related to local infrastructure, high-tech and global community. In contrast, local language brand names are more likely to be used in product categories associated to subscriptions. Findings also suggest that Hofstede's national cultural dimensions are significant factors. Finally, the results revealed that foreign language brand names are more likely to be used in markets with a low level of foreign language proficiency.

Originality/value

This paper shows the importance of considering market and product category characteristics and their potential influence on local versus foreign language branding in Latin America – an ignored issue in previous research.

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Management Decision, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 23 June 2020

Anne-Sophie V. Radermecker

To analyze the market reception of multi-authored works of art through the lens of collaborative old master paintings (“formal/prestige collaboration”). This paper tests…

Abstract

Purpose

To analyze the market reception of multi-authored works of art through the lens of collaborative old master paintings (“formal/prestige collaboration”). This paper tests whether multi-authored attribution strategies (i.e. naming two artists as brand names) affect buyers' willingness to pay differently from single-authored works in the auction market.

Design/methodology/approach

This case study focuses on collaborative paintings by Flemish masters, based on a data set comprising 11,630 single-authored and collaborative paintings auctioned between 1946 and 2015. Hedonic regressions have been employed to test whether or not co-branded artworks are differently valued by buyers and how the reputation of each artist might influence valuation.

Findings

Despite the opportunity for buyers to purchase one artwork with two brand names, this study reveals that the average value of collaborative paintings is statistically lower than that of single-authored paintings. This is especially true when a reputed master was involved in the collaboration. The present findings suggest that the valuable characteristics of formal collaborations (i.e. double brand name, dual authorship and reputation, high-quality standards) are no longer perceived and valued as such by buyers, and that co-branding can affect the artist brand equity because of a contagion effect. We argue that integral authorship is more valued than partial authorship, suggesting that the myth of the artist as a lone genius is still well-anchored in purchasing habits.

Research limitations/implications

Prestige collaborations are a very particular form of early co-branding in the art world, with limited data available. Further research should consider larger samples to reiterate the analysis on other collaboration forms in order to challenge the current findings.

Practical implications

Researchers and living artists should be aware that brand building and co-branding are marketing strategies that may generate negative effects on prices in the art market. The perceived and market value of co-branded works are time-varying, and depends on both the context of reception of these works and the reputation of the artists at time t.

Originality/value

This market segment has never been considered in art market studies, although formal collaboration is one of the earliest documented forms of co-branding in the art world. This paper provides new empirical evidence from the auction market, based on buyers' willingness to pay, and it further highlights the reception of multi-authored art objects in Western art markets that particularly value individual creators.

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Arts and the Market, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4945

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Article
Publication date: 19 February 2020

Bo Chen

Both foreign and local companies frequently name their brands in foreign language on the market of developing countries, and some of them choose to disclose the brands'…

Abstract

Purpose

Both foreign and local companies frequently name their brands in foreign language on the market of developing countries, and some of them choose to disclose the brands' country of origin to consumers. The purpose of this research is to investigate the joint effects between the practices of disclosing the actual country of origin of the brands and the language of the brand names on consumers' purchase intention for foreign brands and local brands in developing countries.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed hypotheses were tested in two studies, namely an experiment and a field experimental survey, with stimuli from two product categories.

Findings

The results of the two empirical studies with Chinese participants consistently demonstrate that revealing the actual country of origin of the brands undermines consumers' purchase intention for local brands that use foreign brand names, but does not impact consumers' purchase intention for foreign brands that use local brand names.

Originality/value

This research first investigates the effects of adapting the brand names into local language of developing countries for brands from developed countries on consumers' purchase intention, which provides new insight into the literature on foreign branding and country of origin effects as well as practical implications for brand managers.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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