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Book part
Publication date: 19 May 2009

Richard Reeves-Ellington

Organizational studies fail to examine organizations in terms of the several environments in which they operate, both internally and externally. That is, studies tend to…

Abstract

Organizational studies fail to examine organizations in terms of the several environments in which they operate, both internally and externally. That is, studies tend to focus on climate, or time, or trust, or leadership. This chapter builds on academic research that discusses organizational environments in ways that show all of these environments are important for organizational understanding, especially for organizational leadership. In particular, this chapter offers a paradigm of understanding organizational leadership realities through multi-level understanding of the organizational environments of climate, knowledge, ethnos, and time.

The chapter first discusses five enviroscapes – climate, knowledge, ethos, time, and leadership. Each of these enviroscapes has two phenotypes – business and commerce. Each of these enviroscapes, with its concomitant phenotypes, is used differently at multiple levels of management and leadership by senior managers, middle managers, and entry-level managers. The scope of organizational reach, in terms of global, regional, and local levels of analysis, provides additional context for the use of enviroscapes. After a review of the theoretical bases for each enviroscape, the chapter applies appropriate theory and models to an extended time case study of land purchase in Indonesia.

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Multi-Level Issues in Organizational Behavior and Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-503-7

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Book part
Publication date: 14 December 2016

Moses Kibe Kihiko and Mary Wanjiru Kinoti

The purpose of this study was to investigate the trends of climate change and their impact on businesses in Kenya’s Public Listed Companies (PLCs).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to investigate the trends of climate change and their impact on businesses in Kenya’s Public Listed Companies (PLCs).

Design/methodology/approach

Out of 66 PLCs, the researchers interviewed 10 companies, and therefore obtained a 15% sample. The methodology was utilization of both primary and secondary data and by use of a combination of the structured and unstructured interviews.

Findings

The findings indicated that, although climate change issues are mentioned or implied in strategic plans and core values, they rarely however, translate to normal or day-to-day conversation or operation of the businesses. PESTEL factors are cited as having a very positive impact on businesses that are technological and economic, contrary to environmental/climate change factors which have a more negative than positive effect on the business. Electricity outages/shortages will have serious impact, while agricultural, tourism, insurance, and aviation sectors are likely to be most severely affected by climate change. The hypothesis that climate change is affecting all businesses was accepted while that stating that climate change is significantly impacting businesses negatively rather than positively by increasing operating costs which may result to closure if not mitigated by 2030 was rejected.

Practical implications

Companies should not adopt a “business as usual” attitude but invest in training on effects and strategies for mitigation as well as adaptation and translate climate issues into action as well as create synergy in tackling climate change issues.

Originality/value

The research is valuable to environmentalists, meteorologists, business community, academicians, as well as scientists and scholars alike both nationally and internationally.

Details

Climate Change and the 2030 Corporate Agenda for Sustainable Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-819-6

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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2012

Katarina Buhr and Mattias Hjerpe

In absence of extensive regulation, expectations can be a noteworthy institutional pressure driving corporate climate change action. The purpose of this study is to…

Abstract

Purpose

In absence of extensive regulation, expectations can be a noteworthy institutional pressure driving corporate climate change action. The purpose of this study is to explore expectations on businesses to act on climate change when the anticipations for a new global climate agreement are relatively low. Expectations on corporate climate action are compared in two ways: to the previous year, when anticipations for a new international climate treaty were high, and to other categories of societal actors.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper builds on a questionnaire handed out to an élite sample of 205 participants at the UN climate conference COP16/CMP6 in Cancún 2010, when anticipations were low for regulatory breakthrough in the international climate negotiations.

Findings

The responses suggest that expectations on businesses in 2010 did not decrease compared to 2009, when anticipations were high for regulatory breakthrough. A total of 40 percent of the respondents indicated that their expectations had increased since the previous year. Expectations on businesses were relatively high compared to other societal actors; and the highest expectations were expressed by businesses themselves.

Originality/value

The results provide an empirical foundation which stimulates thinking around expectations that make up an important component in the business environment. It is the first systematic ranking of expectations on business to act on climate change among participants at the UN climate change conference, one of the most prominent arenas in the field. The timing for the data collection provides a unique opportunity to analyse how expectations are related to different levels of regulatory anticipation.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Bhagaban Panigrahi, Fred O. Ede and Stephen Calcich

Presents the results of an empirical investigation into American executives’ perceptions of business climates in India and China. Addresses six distinct issues cocnerning…

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1793

Abstract

Presents the results of an empirical investigation into American executives’ perceptions of business climates in India and China. Addresses six distinct issues cocnerning economy, management, marketing, government, labour and finance. Attempts to establish the homogeneity of internal consistency of the shortened version of Buntzman’s 31 item scale used in the study. Surveyed 110 US businessmen working in these countries. Suggests that findings show India to possess a more favourable business climate but perceive China’s economy to be better.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 31 July 2009

Bettina B.F. Wittneben and Dagmar Kiyar

This paper sets out to tackle the issue of climate change from a business perspective. It seeks to discuss why it is important to take climate change considerations into…

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3945

Abstract

Purpose

This paper sets out to tackle the issue of climate change from a business perspective. It seeks to discuss why it is important to take climate change considerations into account in business decisions, how this can be done and what further action is required from managers and business scholars.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes ways of reducing emissions and adapting to climate change that can be implemented by any business. As an illustration, the proposed climate strategy of a large European utility company, RWE, is provided.

Findings

There are numerous ways to reduce emissions within business operations, along the supply chain and surrounding product usage and disposal. Climate‐proofing operations is also becoming increasingly pertinent to businesses.

Research limitations/implications

New ways have to be found yet in order to take emission reductions to a more ambitious level by altering patterns of production and consumption.

Practical implications

The paper discusses how businesses can reduce their carbon footprint and anticipate changes in the physical and political environment related to climate change.

Originality/value

The paper is of value to managers who, today, are expected not only to reduce emissions from operations, but also to gain an awareness of the physical, political and social risks stemming from the impacts of climate change.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 47 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 19 May 2020

Emily Gaynor Dick-Forde, Elin Merethe Oftedal and Giovanna Merethe Bertella

The purpose of this study is to explore the perceptions of key actors in the Caribbean’s hotel industry on the development of business models that are inclusive of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the perceptions of key actors in the Caribbean’s hotel industry on the development of business models that are inclusive of the sustainable development goals (SDGs) and resilient to climate change challenges. The objectives are to gain a better understanding of the central actors’ perspective and to explore the potential of scenario thinking as a pragmatic tool to provoke deep and practical reflections on business model innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based on a questionnaire survey conducted via email to senior personnel in the hotel industry across the region as well as to national and regional tourism and hospitality associations/agencies and government ministries. The questionnaire used a mix of close- and open-ended questions, as well as fictional scenarios to gain insight about perceptions from key actors in the tourism sector, including respondents’ personal beliefs about the reality of climate science and the need for action at the levels of individuals, governments, local, regional and multinational institutions.

Findings

The study found that while the awareness of climate change and willingness to action is high, respondents perceive that hotels are not prepared for the climate crisis. Respondents had an overall view that the hotel sector in the Caribbean was unprepared for the negative impacts of climate change. Recommendations from the study include the need for immediate action on the part of all to both raise awareness and implement focused climate action to secure the future of tourism in the Caribbean.

Research limitations/implications

The use of a survey has considerable challenges, including low response rates and the limitations of using perceptions to understand a phenomenon. The survey was conducted across the Caribbean from The Bahamas to Belize and down to Trinidad and Tobago so that views from across the similar, yet diverse, regions could be gathered, included and compared for a comprehensive view of perceptions and possible ideas for climate smart action.

Practical implications

The 2030 Agenda for SDGs is based on policy and academic debates. This study helps to bridge the academic and policy discussion with the needs of the industry.

Originality/value

This study contributes a consideration for climate-resilient business models for hotels in the tourism industry as a definitive action toward achieving SDG 13. This combined with the use of fictional climate change scenarios to access perceptions about the future of the hotel industry in the light of climate change, adds originality to the study.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

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Article
Publication date: 11 December 2019

Jagadish Thaker

The purpose of this paper is to comparatively analyze how top corporations in New Zealand, Australia and the Global Fortune 500 group communicate about climate science.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to comparatively analyze how top corporations in New Zealand, Australia and the Global Fortune 500 group communicate about climate science.

Design/methodology/approach

A combination of keyword count and quantitative content analysis is used to develop a reliable set of indicators to measure corporate communication about climate science.

Findings

Just a few corporations mention or explicitly agree with scientific consensus on climate change and few report science-based targets. They report more frequently on societal risks of climate change, as well as business contribution and responsibility. New Zealand based corporations generally do poor reporting compared to Australian corporations, who do as well as the biggest corporations in the world.

Research limitations/implications

There is a further need for cross-country research and for more longitudinal analysis to understand how organizations communicate about scientific issues to its stakeholders.

Practical implications

This paper can inform communication managers about the need to pay attention to how their communication, individually and in comparison with their peers, is likely interpreted by the stakeholders. Managers may attend to scientific consensus messaging to gain stakeholder approval for ambitious business actions on climate change.

Social implications

Organizations are powerful social and economic drivers. Understanding how they interpret and communicate a scientific issue has implications for public and policy discourses and outcomes.

Originality/value

This is the first paper to comparatively identify common and contextual drivers of business communication of complex scientific issues. A reliable scale to measure climate science communication by corporations will be helpful for future researchers to replicate in other sectors.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2008

Elizabeth Houldsworth and Simon Machin

The purpose of this paper is to present a case study around an approach to team performance management being deployed within the BELRON group of companies. The device…

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6028

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a case study around an approach to team performance management being deployed within the BELRON group of companies. The device being deployed is the climate measure (OCSII), which is being used within the organisation as an indicator of leadership capability. Although the results of climate surveys may be reported at both team and individual levels, this paper seeks to focus on team climate and how this may be linked to changes in business performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The performance management approach has been aligned to a strategic intent, as championed by the CEO, to focus on leadership development as a key enabler of BELRON's future success. The paper considers the deployment of the climate tool within the Top Teams of three different business units and this is linked to available information relating to performance.

Findings

The paper finds that, within BELRON, there is a belief that the emphasis on climate has been a major contributor to its enhanced business performance over recent years. The paper presents information from three BELRON contexts where changes in climate would appear to precede improvements in business performance. However, despite these examples, i.e. where “high performing climates” appear to be linked with profitability, or other measures of business performance, this is not seen to be universal within the company.

Research limitations/implications

The work reported has limitations in that it focuses on only three positive examples of a possible climate/performance link at BELRON.

Practical implications

The paper makes a key contribution for practitioners, particularly HR, OD professionals and consultants as well as any senior manager concerned with managing performance. The climate survey being deployed in this context (the OCSII) is a tool which has been in use since the 1960s, with many claims made about its links to performance. However, the vast majority of the work has been conducted in a consultancy setting without much coverage in academic literatures.

Originality/value

The paper describes for the reader how the OSCII tool may be deployed to support team performance management. It then describes how the instrument has been deployed within the Top Teams of three business units within BELRON.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 26 July 2013

Suresh Renukappa, Akintola Akintoye, Charles Egbu and Jack Goulding

The problem of climate change is one aspect of the broader problem of sustainability. Many businesses in most sectors now accept that they must address the issue of climate

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1745

Abstract

Purpose

The problem of climate change is one aspect of the broader problem of sustainability. Many businesses in most sectors now accept that they must address the issue of climate change in order to survive and grow in ever‐changing entangled business economies. Due to mounting pressure from stakeholders, top executives of many organisations are now implementing various carbon emissions reduction strategies. However, the extent to which businesses embrace climate change and carbon management as an integral pillar of their business models remains unclear and poorly understood. This paper seeks to address these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The aim of this research is to investigate the key carbon emissions reduction initiatives currently being implemented in the UK industrial sectors so as to improve their competitiveness. In order to achieve this aim, a mixed research methodological approach was adopted to collect and analyse data. Four industry sectors were examined, specifically: energy and utilities, transportation, construction and not‐for‐profit organisations; with specific respect to their environmental, social and economic impact on the UK society.

Findings

The level of implementation of carbon emissions reduction strategies within the UK industrial sectors is fairly “low” and varies significantly across the four sectors; with relatively high uptake in the energy and utilities sector, and low uptake in the construction sector. The level of implementation of change management initiatives to deal with carbon emissions reduction initiatives is also relatively “low”.

Practical implications

This study suggests that carbon emissions reduction strategies are in their infancy. Taken together, the impact of management commitment and leadership, climate change‐related policies, structures, reward systems, training programmes and performance reporting are key factors in successful implementation of low carbon strategies. The paper concludes that there is a need for cross‐sector collaboration to capture and share best and worst practices relating to low carbon strategies.

Originality/value

The paper provides a richer insight into the understanding and awareness of low carbon strategies for competitive advantage.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

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Article
Publication date: 10 May 2011

Fenwick Feng Jing, Gayle C. Avery and Harald Bergsteiner

The purpose of this paper is to address an important gap in the literature by investigating the relationship between organizational climate and performance in small businesses.

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4362

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address an important gap in the literature by investigating the relationship between organizational climate and performance in small businesses.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 100 retail pharmacies in Sydney, Australia where a manager and up to three staff members and three buying customers were interviewed in each pharmacy.

Findings

Supportive climates tend to be associated with higher organizational performance (i.e. financial performance, staff satisfaction, customer satisfaction) in small retail pharmacies, and may reduce staff turnover.

Practical implications

The results suggest that managers should consider creating warm and supportive organizational climates to enhance business performance, employee job satisfaction and organizational commitment, and increase employee tenure.

Originality/value

This paper is among the first to empirically establish a direct link between organizational climate and the performance of small businesses, in particular in retail pharmacies. Both financial and non‐financial measures of performance confirm reports based on larger firms that performance is enhanced in the presence of more supportive organizational climates. A further benefit of supportive climates, namely lower staff turnover in small businesses, was also evident.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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