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Book part
Publication date: 21 May 2021

Peterson K. Ozili

Purpose: This chapter discusses the need for climate change risk mitigation and why it is not the responsibility of Central Banks to mitigate climate change risk.…

Abstract

Purpose: This chapter discusses the need for climate change risk mitigation and why it is not the responsibility of Central Banks to mitigate climate change risk.

Methodology: This chapter uses critical discourse analysis to explain why central banks should not have the responsibility for climate change risk mitigation.

Findings: This chapter argues that the responsibility for managing climate change risk should lie with elected officials, other groups and institutions but not Central Banks. Elected officials, or politicians, should be held responsible to deal with the consequence of climate change events. Also, international organizations and everybody can take responsibility for climate change while the Central Bank can provide assistance – but Central Banks should not lead the climate policy making or mitigation agenda.

Implication: The policy implication is that the responsibility for climate change risk mitigation should be shifted to politicians who are elected officials of the people. Also, international climate change organizations or groups can take responsibility for mitigating the climate change risk of member countries. Finally, citizens in a country or region should have equal responsibility for climate change. Climate information should be provided to every citizen to help them prepare for future climatic conditions.

Originality: This chapter propagates the idea that Central Banks should take a lead role in dealing with the problems of climate change. This chapter is the first chapter to contest a Central Bank-led climate change risk mitigation agenda.

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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2011

Judith Mair

The purpose of this paper is to consider some of the issues of vulnerability and risk, mitigation, adaptation and the adaptive capacity of events. Given the significance…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider some of the issues of vulnerability and risk, mitigation, adaptation and the adaptive capacity of events. Given the significance of events to community, society and the economy, it seems imperative that the risks of any potential negative effects of climate change on this sector are understood, and that the capacity of events to adapt to and mitigate climate change is identified.

Design/methodology/approach

This exploratory conceptual paper considers some of the issues of vulnerability and risk, mitigation, adaptation and the adaptive capacity of events, and highlights the fact that different types of events are likely to be affected unequally by climate change.

Findings

The paper finds that different types of events are likely to be impacted in different ways by climate change. It also concludes that smaller, community events and larger hallmark events are likely to be most seriously affected by climate change, as they are types of events which rely on specific locations and venues.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations are those of a conceptual paper – although the empirical research on climate change and tourism may reflect the situation for the events industry, this has not yet been tested. Future research should test the propositions in this paper.

Practical implications

The paper suggests strongly that the events industry should incorporate strategies for adapting to climate change impacts into its policy and planning. Some of the likely climate change impacts are identified in the paper, along with potential adaptation solutions.

Originality/value

This topic has not yet been addressed in the academic literature and therefore the paper represents an important step in the understanding of climate change. The paper has academic value as a platform to underpin future research and practical value for event organisers planning for an uncertain future.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

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Article
Publication date: 18 January 2016

Patricia J Hartman

Keeping up with the abundance of new materials on climate change can be a challenge for selectors of library materials. There is a need for an updated list of recommended…

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484

Abstract

Purpose

Keeping up with the abundance of new materials on climate change can be a challenge for selectors of library materials. There is a need for an updated list of recommended titles in the library literature.

Design/methodology/approach

An exhaustive literature review was performed on climate change books published within the past four years.

Findings

The following is an annotated bibliography of 22 recommended titles focused on climate change that were published within that timeframe.

Originality/value

This will be helpful to librarians seeking to develop or update climate change collections.

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2010

Melissa Nursey‐Bray

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the development of climate change adaptation curricula. Instituting adaptation frameworks that can assist professionals to…

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1468

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the development of climate change adaptation curricula. Instituting adaptation frameworks that can assist professionals to respond to climate change, yet be tailored to specific sectoral needs is crucial. Professionals working at the coalface of the climate change challenge need to build new skills and create innovative solutions in social and political contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

Using case studies, this paper reflects on the experience of developing climate change curricula at multiple levels and the obstacles to implementation of the links between curriculum and practice. This includes reflections on the necessity of interlinking political, social and economic aspects together in delivery of such a course.

Findings

The paper finds that a strictly content – based approach to curriculum development is inadequate. The context of an issue like climate change requires attention to the specific needs of the target audience, in addition to delivery of generic content, so as to achieve the industry uptake critical to ensuring social and political objectives are implemented on the ground.

Originality/value

The paper concludes by examining the utility of such educational initiatives to build community resilience, forge networks between multiple sectors and contribute to achieving social/institutional, political and economic outcomes for adaptation to climate change.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

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Book part
Publication date: 25 September 2020

Peterson K. Ozili

Climate change is emerging as an important issue increasing uncertainty in the business circle, and financial institutions through their inaction seem to be unmoved by…

Abstract

Climate change is emerging as an important issue increasing uncertainty in the business circle, and financial institutions through their inaction seem to be unmoved by climate change risk despite the potential for climate change events to affect the financial institutions and the financial system. In this chapter, the effect of climate change on financial institutions and the financial system are highlighted and discussed.

Details

Uncertainty and Challenges in Contemporary Economic Behaviour
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-095-2

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2015

Norma Gomez

– This paper aims to assess the vulnerability of the farmer-respondents in Southern Philippines, specifically Region XI and XII, to climate change.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to assess the vulnerability of the farmer-respondents in Southern Philippines, specifically Region XI and XII, to climate change.

Design/methodology/approach

This study conducted an empirical analysis of the impact of climate change on maize (Zea mays), banana (Musa sapientum) and durian (Durio zibethinus) production. Furthermore, it estimated the determinants of adaptation to climate change and its corresponding effect on farm productivity. The analysis used primary data from 541 farmer-respondents producing maize, banana and durian in the 6 provinces and 18 municipalities of the sample areas.

Findings

Based on the probit estimate results, farmers adaptation decisions were influenced by information about future climate change conditions, social capital, access to formal extension and farmer-to-farmer extension. The author found from the stochastic frontier estimation in the production function that climate change adaptations exerted a significant impact on farm productivity. It helped in coping with the adverse effects and risk of climate change while increasing agricultural productivities of the farmer-respondents.

Originality/value

This research paper will be an addition to the body of knowledge on the socioeconomic aspects on the climate change and adaptation on the production of maize, banana and durian in the case of a developing country like Southern Philippines. This will bring more insights into the adaptation strategies that are crucial to cope with climatic variability and change.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

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Abstract

Details

Environmental Security in Greece
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-360-4

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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2021

Geetilaxmi Mohapatra and Meera George

The study aims to analyze the gender-wise perception of the agricultural households toward climate change and the adaption measures taken by these households, especially…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to analyze the gender-wise perception of the agricultural households toward climate change and the adaption measures taken by these households, especially women, to mitigate climate changes.

Design/methodology/approach

Purposive random sampling technique is used to collect primary data from a pilot survey conducted in two semi-arid districts of Rajasthan, India. Data mainly focused on analyzing the gender-based perception and adaptation strategies undertaken toward climate change. And descriptive statistics are used for analysis.

Findings

The study found that both the gender are aware of the climatic changes. Deforestation increased population, change in living standards, urbanization and industrialization contribute to climate changes. The women are employing limited adaptation strategies to mitigate the climatic stress compared to males.

Research limitations/implications

This is a pilot study; hence, it has an insufficient sample size for the detailed statistical analysis. Further, it is only limited to two semi-arid districts of Rajasthan.

Originality/value

This pioneering study highlights gender-wise differences in perception and adaptation strategies undertaken in this region. The study suggests raising awareness about climate change and providing credit facilities for undertaking adaptation measures to reduce agricultural households' vulnerability, particularly enhancing women's adaptive capacity to climate change.

Details

Ecofeminism and Climate Change, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2633-4062

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Book part
Publication date: 17 June 2020

Fetalai Gagaeolo, Sarah Hemstock and Connor Price

This chapter examines the perceived socio-cultural impacts of relocation to Fiji through the lens of target communities in Kiribati. Findings based on the perceptions of…

Abstract

This chapter examines the perceived socio-cultural impacts of relocation to Fiji through the lens of target communities in Kiribati. Findings based on the perceptions of Kiribati communities reveal that relocation is the last ‘adaptation resort’ to escape and offset individual losses caused by climate change. It is viewed as an option that will compromise their socio-cultural practices and values in the long term. This study indicates that attention should not be focused only on factors that drive human relocation but should also prioritise justifications of those who choose not to relocate. This approach will better serve community expectations for in-country climate change adaptation and help shape future strategies and/or policies on climate change-driven relocation. Finally, policies and adaptation initiatives should be holistically framed; integrating values that are important to grassroots level such as socio-cultural values; and spiritual and mobility concerns for informed decision-making at all levels.

Details

Science, Faith and the Climate Crisis
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-987-1

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Article
Publication date: 25 November 2021

Divine Odame Appiah, Felix Asante, Lois Antwi-Boadi and Richard Serbeh

This paper aims to examine elderly smallholder farmers’ perceptions of and adaptation to climate variability and change in the Offinso Municipality, Ghana.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine elderly smallholder farmers’ perceptions of and adaptation to climate variability and change in the Offinso Municipality, Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper used quantitative and qualitative methods. Quantitative data were analyzed with frequencies and chi-square tests, whereas qualitative data were thematically analyzed.

Findings

The results showed that elderly smallholder farmers’ knowledge of climate variability and climate change were based on their sex, level of formal education and experience in farming. Elderly smallholder farmers adopted both on-farm and off-farm strategies to cope with climate change and variability. The vulnerability of elderly smallholder farmers to climate change calls for social protection mechanisms such as a pension scheme that guarantees access to monthly cash transfers. Such a scheme will ease constraints to livelihood and ensure improved well-being.

Originality/value

Elderly smallholder farmers have remained invisible in discourses on perceptions and adaptation to climate change despite the surge in number of this category of farmers. This paper therefore represents an attempt to highlight the experiences of elderly smallholder farmers with climate variability and change.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

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