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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Eunju Suh, Matt Alhaery, Brett Abarbanel and Andrew McKenna

This study aims to examine Millennials and generational differences in online gambling activity by comparing online gambling behavior across four different generations…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine Millennials and generational differences in online gambling activity by comparing online gambling behavior across four different generations: Silent Generation, Baby Boomers, Gen Xers and Millennials.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample comprised tracked gambling data at the individual player level provided by an online casino accepting real money wagers in a major US gambling market. Attributes of gambling behavior were examined and compared across different generations using Kruskal–Wallis test and pairwise comparisons.

Findings

Generational differences were observed in 13 of the 16 behavioral variables. Millennials spent the least amount of time on gambling and exhibited the lowest scores on the number of days for slot gambling, trip length and trip frequency among all generations. However, their average table gaming volume per play day was greater than those of other generations.

Practical implications

The results of this study provide a better understanding of the generational differences in online gambling behavior. They also help casino operators and gaming machine manufacturers develop casino games and products that can appeal to different generational groups in the online gambling market.

Originality/value

Despite the on-going industry discussion about Millennials and their potential influence on the online gambling market, there appears to be a paucity of empirical research on the online gambling behavior of the Millennial generation. This study fills that gap in empirical evidence, addressing generational differences in online gambling.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Technology, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-9880

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 30 January 2013

Jacqueline A. Stefkovich, Kevin M. McKenna and Andrew L. Armagost

A charter school is a public school but without some of the constraints that bind public school leaders. On the other hand, charter schools are businesses, needing to find…

Abstract

A charter school is a public school but without some of the constraints that bind public school leaders. On the other hand, charter schools are businesses, needing to find space, market their “product,” and attract teachers who share their mission. This business aspect of education combined with a specifically articulated mission and somewhat greater freedom and flexibility in educating children can, and often does, raise the ethical stakes for administrators and teachers as they endeavor to provide leadership in charter schools. These issues are best addressed through examining standards and dispositions set forth by professional bodies as well as a consideration of the ethical frames of justice, care, critique, and the profession.

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Identifying Leaders for Urban Charter, Autonomous and Independent Schools: Above and Beyond the Standards
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-501-2

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Article
Publication date: 26 September 2018

Eloise Wallace and Kay Morris Matthews

Museums and academics collaborating to create knowledge and learning opportunities is a current innovative strand of museum theory and practice. Working together across…

Abstract

Purpose

Museums and academics collaborating to create knowledge and learning opportunities is a current innovative strand of museum theory and practice. Working together across boundaries, incorporating a range of communication tools both inside and outside of the exhibition, the objective is to make the past more accessible to adults and children alike. The paper reflects the authors’ respective recent experiences of presenting alternative perspectives and interpretations on history that mattered, namely, a unique exhibition and publication entitled Recovery: Women’s Overseas Service in World War One. The authors offer a number of “signposts” for museums and academics to consider ahead of embarking on collaborative projects. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Theorising and reflecting on the research and curation of a public history museum exhibition that included high levels of community engagement.

Findings

The authors offer a number of “signposts” for museums and academics to consider ahead of embarking on collaborative projects utilising a collective impact framework and argue that these “signposts” are likely pre-requisites for successful museum-academic partnerships.

Originality/value

Successful partnerships and collaborations between the museum and the tertiary sector do not happen through goodwill and shared philosophies alone. This paper reflects the authors’ respective recent experiences of presenting alternative perspectives and interpretations on history that mattered, namely, a unique exhibition and publication entitled Recovery: Women’s Overseas Service in World War One.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 47 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Helio Fred Garcia

This article offers guidelines for effective crisis response.

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10499

Abstract

Purpose

This article offers guidelines for effective crisis response.

Design/methodology/approach

Its thesis is: whether an organization survives a crisis with its reputation, operations, and financial condition intact is determined less by the severity of the crisis than by the timeliness and effectiveness of the response

Findings

Companies with effective crisis response saw their stock price recover quickly, and remain above their pre‐crisis price thereafter, closing an average of seven percent above their pre‐crisis price one year after the crisis.

Practical implications

Offers do and don't prescriptions for managing a crisis.

Originality/value

A consultant recognized as an authority in his field shares his experience in effective crisis management.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 3 January 2015

Brian McKenna

This chapter describes a case study of a social change project in medical education (primary care), in which the critical interpretive evaluation methodology I sought to…

Abstract

This chapter describes a case study of a social change project in medical education (primary care), in which the critical interpretive evaluation methodology I sought to use came up against the “positivist” approach preferred by senior figures in the medical school who commissioned the evaluation.

I describe the background to the study and justify the evaluation approach and methods employed in the case study – drawing on interviews, document analysis, survey research, participant observation, literature reviews, and critical incidents – one of which was the decision by the medical school hierarchy to restrict my contact with the lay community in my official evaluation duties. The use of critical ethnography also embraced wider questions about circuits of power and the social and political contexts within which the “social change” effort occurred.

Central to my analysis is John Gaventa’s theory of power as “the internalization of values that inhibit consciousness and participation while encouraging powerlessness and dependency.” Gaventa argued, essentially, that the evocation of power has as much to do with preventing decisions as with bringing them about. My chosen case illustrated all three dimensions of power that Gaventa originally uncovered in his portrait of self-interested Appalachian coal mine owners: (1) communities were largely excluded from decision making power; (2) issues were avoided or suppressed; and (3) the interests of the oppressed went largely unrecognized.

The account is auto-ethnographic, hence the study is limited by my abilities, biases, and subject positions. I reflect on these in the chapter.

The study not only illustrates the unique contribution of case study as a research methodology but also its low status in the positivist paradigm adhered to by many doctors. Indeed, the tension between the potential of case study to illuminate the complexities of community engagement through thick description and the rejection of this very method as inherently “flawed” suggests that medical education may be doomed to its neoliberal fate for some time to come.

Details

Case Study Evaluation: Past, Present and Future Challenges
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-064-3

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 22 May 2013

Barbara A. Marinak and Linda B. Gambrell

Purpose – To provide classroom teachers with the rationale and methods necessary to grow the engagement of struggling readers.Design/methodology/approach – The chapter is…

Abstract

Purpose – To provide classroom teachers with the rationale and methods necessary to grow the engagement of struggling readers.Design/methodology/approach – The chapter is organized as a series of mini case studies.Findings – Provides a comprehensive description of the methods/practices used with each student or group of students in order to encourage methodological replication.Research limitations/implications – This is not an exhaustive overview of engaging methods, but the case studies should be familiar to classroom teachers and reading specialists. The authors carefully explain how the methods were differentiated for each student or group of students. In addition, the methods are described in sufficient detail so as to ensure that readers can utilize the methods and/or practices with their struggling readers.Practical implications – The chapter advocates that classroom teachers and/or reading specialists carefully consider motivation when planning intervention. The crafted case studies illuminate how such planning and delivery might be implemented.Originality/value of chapter – In order for struggling readers to engage with text for purpose and pleasure, a responsive approach is necessary. Such an approach considers motivation as a critical competent of effective intervention.

Details

School-Based Interventions for Struggling Readers, K-8
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-696-5

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2021

Julie Rachel Adams-Guppy and Andrew Guppy

The purpose of this study is to compare driver knowledge, attitudes and perceptions (in terms of hazard, risk, accident, offence detection and driving skill perceptions…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to compare driver knowledge, attitudes and perceptions (in terms of hazard, risk, accident, offence detection and driving skill perceptions) and self-reported driving style in a sample of 461 drivers before and after attending a UK driver improvement scheme for culpable collision-involved drivers, to inform future directions in the design of driver retraining programmes.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants were a sample of 461 drivers attending a UK 1.5 day driver improvement scheme course for culpable collision-involved drivers. The course contained classroom-based training and a practical driving component. Participants completed a driver improvement scheme questionnaire before and immediately after attending the 1.5-day course and again 3 months later.

Findings

Results indicated significant pre- and post-course effects in terms of increased driving safety with respect to driving knowledge, perceptions of control, perceived likelihood of accident-involvement, hazard perception and reported risk-taking. Key positive effects of reduced risk-taking and near-misses persisted three months after course completion.

Research limitations/implications

One limitation of this study is that at the 3-month follow-up there was a reduction in the response rate (44.69%) which included significantly fewer young drivers.

Practical implications

Results indicate positive behavioural, perceptual and behavioural changes, along with specific age, gender and driving experience effects which have implications for the design of future driving courses.

Social implications

This study has implications for community safety through enhanced road safety training measures.

Originality/value

The analysis of age, gender and driving experience effects of the impact of this driver improvement scheme will allow targeted training methods for specific groups of drivers.

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1999

Andrew O’Loughlin and Elspeth McFadzean

To date, many of the models and theories that seek to explain problem solving and decision making, have tended to adopt an overly reductionist view of the processes…

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4150

Abstract

To date, many of the models and theories that seek to explain problem solving and decision making, have tended to adopt an overly reductionist view of the processes involved. As a consequence, most theories and models have proved unsuitable in providing managers with a practical explanation of the dynamics that underpin problem solving. A substantial part of a manager’s time is taken up with problem solving and decision making issues. The question of whether managers possess the necessary problem solving skills, or have access to “tools”, which can be used to manage different types of problems, has become an issue of some importance for managers and organisations alike. This paper seeks to contribute to the current literature on problem solving and decision making, by presenting a conceptual model of problem solving, which is intended to assist managers in developing a more holistic framework for managing problem solving issues.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2019

Frederick J. Brigham, John William McKenna and Michele M. Brigham

Students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) have poor school outcomes and serious problems in life after school. Transition services are intended to promote…

Abstract

Students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) have poor school outcomes and serious problems in life after school. Transition services are intended to promote more positive outcomes for these individuals and other students with disabilities. Recent trends in society and education appear to be changing the nature of the current generation of secondary students and young adults, potentially rendering aspects of traditional transition planning obsolete. We review these trends, transition guidelines, and current research and outline an approach that may have merit in dealing with transition for students with EBD in the twenty-first century.

Details

Special Education Transition Services for Students with Disabilities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-977-4

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1998

Brian McKenna

The collocation ‘virtual community’ yokes together a hyper‐modern concept (the virtual, in the cyberspatial sense), and a more ancient one (community, in the sense of the…

Abstract

The collocation ‘virtual community’ yokes together a hyper‐modern concept (the virtual, in the cyberspatial sense), and a more ancient one (community, in the sense of the quality of people holding something in common, and possessing a sense of common identity). In Keywords, British socialist intellectual Raymond Williams recounts that from the seventeenth century (in English) ‘there are signs of the distinction which became especially important from the nineteenth century, in which community was felt to be more immediate than society’. (Williams 1976 p.65) This sense of community as being somehow more organic, more human than externally imposed forms of social organization informs the discussion around the word in the context of the Internet, too. Williams concludes his essay on the word by remarking that

Details

Online and CD-Rom Review, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1353-2642

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