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Book part
Publication date: 15 March 2021

William J. Scarborough, Deborah Fessenden and Ray Sin

Research on gender attitudes has consistently found that younger generations have more gender egalitarian views than older generations. Less attention, however, has been…

Abstract

Research on gender attitudes has consistently found that younger generations have more gender egalitarian views than older generations. Less attention, however, has been directed toward examining whether the generation gap has grown or shrunk over time and whether it differs across dimensions of gender attitudes. Using data from the General Social Survey for years 1977–2018,the authors examine the generational gap in gender attitudes across three components: views toward women in leadership, working mothers, and the gendered division of family labor between public and private spheres. The results show that differences between generations vary significantly across these dimensions. Attitudes have converged over time in support for women’s leadership, yet Baby Boomers espouse slightly higher levels of support than other generations, including the younger Generation Xers and Millennials. In contrast, consistent generation gaps are observed in support for working mothers, where younger generations hold more supportive views than respective older generations. Attitudes toward the gendered division of public/private sphere labor have converged between Millennials, Generation Xers, and Baby Boomers, with only Pre-Baby Boomers holding significantly more traditional views. Collectively, these trends highlight how cultural change through cohort replacement does not uniformly advance gender egalitarian ideologies. Instead, these shifts vary across specific dimensions of gender attitudes.

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Gender and Generations: Continuity and Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-033-7

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2008

Archana Kumar and Heejin Lim

This study aims to investigate the effects of age on mobile service quality perceptions and its impact on perceived value, satisfaction and loyalty between two significant…

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13263

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the effects of age on mobile service quality perceptions and its impact on perceived value, satisfaction and loyalty between two significant mobile service user segments – Generation Y and baby boomers.

Design/methodology/approach

A multiple group structural equation modeling approach is utilized to assess the proposed model.

Findings

The results identify the mobile service quality attributes that are important to Generation Y‐ers and baby boomers. The study also finds significant differences between the two groups in terms of the effect of perceived economic and emotional value on satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation lies in the measurement of service quality. Another limitation is different methods of data collection between two age groups. Future research is recommended to examine differences between other generations, between different ethnic groups, and other demographic variables.

Practical implications

This study strongly suggest the effect of age on mobile service perceptions and loyalty decisions. It is suggested that marketers appeal to the emotional value for Gen Y‐ers while placing an emphasis on economic value for baby boomers.

Originality/value

The proposed role of gender in loyalty decisions provides insights to marketers on how to promote their services for diverse consumer segments.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 22 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2007

Simon Biggs, Chris Phillipson, Rebecca Leach and Annemarie Money

This paper provides a critical assessment of academic and policy approaches to population ageing with an emphasis on the baby boomer cohort and constructions of late‐life…

Abstract

This paper provides a critical assessment of academic and policy approaches to population ageing with an emphasis on the baby boomer cohort and constructions of late‐life identity. It is suggested that policy towards an ageing population has shifted in focus, away from particular social hazards and towards an attempt to re‐engineer the meaning of legitimate ageing and social participation in later life. Three themes are identified: constructing the baby boomers as a force for social change, a downward drift of the age associated with ‘older people’ and a shift away from defining ageing identities through consumption, back towards work and production. The paper concludes with a discussion of the implications for future social and public policy.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Monika Rahulan, Olga Troynikov, Chris Watson, Marius Janta and Veit Senner

– The purpose of this paper is to understand the difference in purchase decision behavior of compression sportswear by Baby Boomers and Generation Y.

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4208

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the difference in purchase decision behavior of compression sportswear by Baby Boomers and Generation Y.

Design/methodology/approach

Two methods were used for data collection: a simulation study with 17 Baby Boomers and 23 Generation Y subjects using eye-tracking technology; and a questionnaire from a sample of 82 Baby Boomers and 84 Generation Y consumers.

Findings

Generation Y are more inquisitive and focus greatly on technical information. Baby Boomers are more confident with their choices, taking a shorter time to reach a purchase decision; they are more concerned with aspects that protect the wearer.

Research limitations/implications

Limited demographic information was collected from participants in the simulation study, further research is required in this area.

Practical implications

This study provides important insights into the purchase decision behavior of Baby Boomers and Generation Y for compression sportswear. By providing better understanding of some of the key drivers for purchase decisions it enables marketers to develop more effective marketing plans to engage with these important consumer groups.

Social implications

The focus and findings of this study provide further understanding of the motivations of two significant consumer cohorts. This study provides further momentum to the body of cohort research already available.

Originality/value

This study addresses a gap in literature with reference to the comparison of consumer behavior of generational cohorts when purchasing compression sportswear. Findings can be applied in other areas of sportswear and to other countries.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2000

James A. Roberts and Chris Manolis

The purpose of the current study was to compare and contrast various marketing‐ and consumer‐related attitudes and behavior across the baby boomer (those born between…

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12400

Abstract

The purpose of the current study was to compare and contrast various marketing‐ and consumer‐related attitudes and behavior across the baby boomer (those born between 1946‐1964) and baby buster (those born between 1965‐1976) generations. Study results suggest that baby busters, compared with baby boomers, are more favorably predisposed toward marketing and advertising. It was also found that the two generations differ in their understanding of the domain of marketing. These findings have important implications for marketing practitioners and academics alike. Possibly the most significant finding of the present study was the generally elevated levels of compulsive buying found across both generations. Using Faber and O’Guinn’s compulsive buying clinical screener, we found that 7 percent of baby boomers and 11 percent of baby busters were classified as compulsive buyers. These are considerably higher than earlier estimates of the incidence of compulsive buying and warrant further investigation.

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Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 17 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 27 May 2014

Ebony Benson and Kim Y. Hiller Connell

– The purpose of this study is to expand the knowledge base of Baby Boomers’ attitudes, behaviours and perceived barriers related to fair trade purchasing.

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1443

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to expand the knowledge base of Baby Boomers’ attitudes, behaviours and perceived barriers related to fair trade purchasing.

Design/methodology/approach

This study included 168 Baby Boomers. Data were collected through an online questionnaire. Data analysis included a combination of both quantitative (descriptive statistics, independent samples t-tests and correlation analysis) and qualitative techniques.

Findings

Findings indicated that the participants exhibited positive attitudes towards fair trade but were minimally engaged in fair trade purchasing. Furthermore, the participants perceived numerous barriers to purchasing fair trade products including the incompatibility of fair trade merchandise with lifestyles, the inability to touch and see fair trade products prior to purchase and difficulty in identifying fair trade items.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation of this study is that the sample was well-educated university faculty and it is not representative of all Baby Boomers.

Practical implications

Fair trade entities need to be more effective in marketing the advantages of the fair trade. Fair trade organizations should consider targeting marketing strategies specific to the unique demographic and psychographic characteristics of Baby Boomer consumers.

Originality/value

This research expands understanding of the consumer behaviours of US Baby Boomers related to fair trade. An additional contribution is the comparison of differences in fair trade knowledge, attitudes and behaviours of Early vs Late Baby Boomers. It also has potentially important implications for fair trade organizations, as the paper discusses marketing strategies specific to Baby Boomers.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

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Article
Publication date: 28 June 2018

Margaret Hardy, Florin Oprescu, Prue Millear and Mathew Summers

The purpose of this paper is to determine how baby boomers define healthy ageing and quality of life, and if late life university study could have a beneficial impact for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine how baby boomers define healthy ageing and quality of life, and if late life university study could have a beneficial impact for future health-promoting initiatives.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative data were collected from Australian baby boomers. Data were inductively categorised to identify and report emergent themes.

Findings

The majority of respondents believed healthy ageing meant being mentally and physically active, with later life university study contributing to mental health, which improves their quality of life.

Social implications

Later life university study can have positive health outcomes for baby boomers and may contribute to the quality of their life.

Originality/value

This study suggests that baby boomers are quite clear about how they define healthy ageing and quality of life: maintaining good health and retaining their independence. Some baby boomers stated that intellectual stimulation was critical for their overall health and wellbeing. Baby boomers identified as belonging to this group engagement in an educational (i.e. university) programme could be considered as a health-promoting intervention.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Osmud Rahman and Hong Yu

The purpose of this paper is to gain an understanding of baby boomers’ physiological and psychological needs through clothing consumption.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to gain an understanding of baby boomers’ physiological and psychological needs through clothing consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative research approach was employed for this study. Data were collected from two generational segments: early baby boomers (1946–1954), and late baby boomers (1955–1964). In total, 13 informants aged from 53 to 71 years were participated in this study. Content analysis and interpretive approach were used for data analysis.

Findings

According to the findings, there are several reasons why the baby boomers shopped for clothing, including a way of stress relief or retail therapy, wardrobe update, replacement of worn-out garments, attractiveness of clothing styles and convenience. Style, fit, comfort and colour were the four most important product evaluative cues. Other than product cues, age appropriateness is an important factor for clothing consumption. Many informants were disappointed with their current body type, shopping experience and the industry offers.

Practical implications

Age-appropriate clothing can give wearers greater self-assurance/-gratification. If fashion designers create their products based on the baby boomers’ cognitive age, it would probably increase their customers’ acceptance and satisfaction.

Originality/value

The rapid growth of the aging population is a global phenomenon. Therefore, investigating the needs and challenges of the baby boomer generation is both timely and imperative. This study intended to offer new knowledge on the issues of baby boomers’ unmet needs, and provide insights and implications to fashion practitioners.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 21 May 2010

Kumiko Osajima, Brenda Sternquist and Sonia Manjeshwar

Japanese materialistic behavior and consumption trends are examined by comparing age‐cohort differences between the Japanese “new breed” and “second babyboomer

Abstract

Japanese materialistic behavior and consumption trends are examined by comparing age‐cohort differences between the Japanese “new breed” and “second babyboomer age‐cohorts”. Price perception, brand loyalty, and shopping‐information sources of the two age‐cohorts are also assessed. Results suggest that the Japanese new breed is more materialistic, sensitive to prestige, brand loyal, and likely to use media as their shopping information source as compared to second babyboomer. On the other hand, second babyboomers are less materialistic, value conscious, less brand loyal, and more likely to rely on word‐of‐mouth communication as their information sources as compared to the Japanese new breeds.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2007

Timothy Reisenwitz and Rajesh Iyer

The purpose of the paper is to examine the relationship between two age cohorts within the baby boomer group, younger baby boomers (born between 1956‐1965) and older baby

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8829

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to examine the relationship between two age cohorts within the baby boomer group, younger baby boomers (born between 1956‐1965) and older baby boomers (born between 1946‐1955), based on various behavioral variables. It is postulated that, even though this group is exceedingly large in number, there are more similarities than differences among its younger and older members.

Design/methodology/approach

The study sample was a convenience sample and consisted of 295 respondents who were in the 40‐58 age category. A questionnaire was administered with scales that were well established and that have been used in previous research.

Findings

With the exception of cognitive age, there were no significant differences between younger and older baby boomers regarding a large number of salient behavioral variables. This conclusion suggests that marketers use caution when applying the widely accepted age segmentation strategy of splitting baby boomers into younger and older boomers.

Originality/value

The results of this study caution the marketer in further dividing the baby boomers group based on cohort segmentation. The results of this study suggest that cohort segmentation is a viable beginning for dividing consumers into groups, but that other demographic and/or psychographic methods need to be considered in subsequent segmentation efforts for baby boomers.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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