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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Jamie Lazar

Bournemouth Churches Housing Association has developed a continuum of accommodation and support services through consultation with residents and local authorities. This is…

Abstract

Bournemouth Churches Housing Association has developed a continuum of accommodation and support services through consultation with residents and local authorities. This is a holistic continuum of services that is designed to be flexible enough to enable residents to move between different services offered as their support needs change. Ultimately, the continuum of support services is intended to empower residents in achieving independent living after moving from fully supported services, to semi‐supported services, to independent accommodation with floating support. It has been possible to develop this range of services by mapping accurately support needs and developing effective professional working relationships with partnership agencies, such as Supporting People Administering Authorities.

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Housing, Care and Support, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Article
Publication date: 14 December 2010

Nick Welch and Angelo Fernandes

This article describes the development of the Supported to Independent Living project (SIL), which is for the support and care for people with mental health needs in…

Abstract

This article describes the development of the Supported to Independent Living project (SIL), which is for the support and care for people with mental health needs in Oxfordshire to live as independently as possible in ordinary housing in the community. The project is a partnership between NHS Oxfordshire (Primary Care Trust), the Oxfordshire Supporting People programme and Oxfordshire County Council Social and Community Services.Although there was a very vigorous development of community living for people with longstanding mental health needs through the provision of group homes, particularly in Oxford City that started in 1963, there has not been an overall strategy for the development of mental health services for the County as a whole. The needs of a diverse, younger, often more mobile and potentially more challenging group of service users for housing with appropriate care and support have not been met.A joint strategy between the County Council and the Primary Care Trust (PCT) to meet these needs has therefore been developed that introduces a pathway of linked accommodation and support arrangements. These range from intensive support through to floating support in the community, and are intended to offer individuals a guided pathway away from specialist services to more mainstream provision. The services are based on the principles of recovery, personalisation and ordinary housing.As well as achieving significantly reconfigured services the strategy has to deliver savings to meet the cuts imposed on the Supporting People programme grant by Central Government.The project has involved the PCT and the County Council in close partnership working, and important and significant involvement of and engagement with service users and carers. A framework agreement has been agreed by all of the organisations involved. It sets out the roles and responsibilities of each and covers local government, the NHS, housing and support.

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Housing, Care and Support, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Laurenz Aselmeier

This paper reports on the manual AQUA‐UWO, an instrument for quality development in supported living services developed by a research group at the Centre for Planning and…

Abstract

This paper reports on the manual AQUA‐UWO, an instrument for quality development in supported living services developed by a research group at the Centre for Planning and Evaluation of Social Services at the University of Siegen in Germany. The extension of supported living services in Germany is still marked by conceptual and financial uncertainty. Debates about the concept and quality of supported living are still not advanced. Against this background, AQUA‐UWO identifies key issues for supported living and formulates professional standards for work in, and management of, supported living. Service user rights for self‐advocacy and self‐determination form the basis of quality assurance and development of supported living services. The first part of the instrument covers conceptual foundations, quality comprehension and methodical procedures. The second part covers key issues, identifies working procedures and clarifies quality standards. The third part includes materials which can be used to support the process of quality development.

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Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2003

Linda Delahay

Supporting People provides the opportunity to put refuge services on a firm financial footing. However, Supporting People only funds adult ‘housing‐related’ bed spaces…

Abstract

Supporting People provides the opportunity to put refuge services on a firm financial footing. However, Supporting People only funds adult ‘housing‐related’ bed spaces. Children use refuge services, and the lack of funding for children's services is a big omission in the new Supporting People funding regime. This needs to be addressed both nationally and locally ‐ children have support needs too. Outreach services which provide a vital lifeline for women who do not access refuges are also absent from the funding strategy to tackle domestic violence. These services are desperately needed, and the challenge for Women's Aid and local authorities is to work together to ensure that all the needs of women and children escaping domestic violence can be properly met. The dislocation of capital and funding issues must be resolved quickly, so that much‐needed additional refuge spaces are developed and women who desperately need a safe place to stay free from violence can be accommodated.

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Housing, Care and Support, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2021

Christine Wee, Trixie Mottershead, Sarah Wright, Sujeet Jaydeokar and Mahesh Odiyoor

This paper aims to improve community care for people with intellectual disabilities (ID) and/or autism. Lack of coordination between agencies leads to children and young…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to improve community care for people with intellectual disabilities (ID) and/or autism. Lack of coordination between agencies leads to children and young people with the most complex needs falling between services. The North West Operational Delivery Network (ODN) for learning disability and autism set out to develop a model of care for mental health services for children and young people with ID and/or autism in North West England that would improve coordination between services and lead to better community care.

Design/methodology/approach

The ODN held a series of good practice events and consultations with stakeholders in North West England to look at gaps in service provision, national guidelines and agree on a pathway for services.

Findings

The ODN decided to use the THRIVE framework as the basis for a specific model of care. Interventions were mapped against the THRIVE groupings, including pathways and team specifications for assessment and support for children with autism, and models for child and adolescent mental health service support for ID and/or autism, for keeping children and young people with behaviour that challenges in the community and transition.

Originality/value

This model aims to provide the North West England region with a clear multi-agency approach for supporting the needs of this population and supports multi-agency commissioning, gap analysis, earlier intervention and improving health outcomes for this population.

Details

Advances in Autism, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3868

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A Machine Learning, Artificial Intelligence Approach to Institutional Effectiveness in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-900-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1986

Few issues in recent times have so provoked debate and dissention within the library field as has the concept of fees for user services. The issue has aroused the passions…

Abstract

Few issues in recent times have so provoked debate and dissention within the library field as has the concept of fees for user services. The issue has aroused the passions of our profession precisely because its roots and implications extend far beyond the confines of just one service discipline. Its reflection is mirrored in national debates about the proper spheres of the public and private sectors—in matters of information generation and distribution, certainly, but in a host of other social ramifications as well, amounting virtually to a debate about the most basic values which we have long assumed to constitute the very framework of our democratic and humanistic society.

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Collection Building, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1998

Ken Simons

The central argument of this paper is that supported living — enabling people with learning disabilities to live in their own homes, with appropriate support — has a…

Abstract

The central argument of this paper is that supported living — enabling people with learning disabilities to live in their own homes, with appropriate support — has a potential strategic role in addressing some of the current shortcomings in community‐based residential services. These shortcomings are described, along with the possible contribution of an approach in which housing and support are separated. Finally some of the current concerns about supported living are briefly addressed.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Article
Publication date: 27 November 2009

Jon Head

This article refers to common values and principles underlying personalisation and housing, and the importance of personalisation for providers like Hanover (a leading…

Abstract

This article refers to common values and principles underlying personalisation and housing, and the importance of personalisation for providers like Hanover (a leading provider of housing and support services for older people). It also refers to challenges that personalisation presents for supported housing services, such as extra care. Possible responses to these challenges include a re‐emphasis on listening to what residents ‐ as well as commissioners ‐ want, an honest appraisal of the concept of choice and its implications, especially in services such as extra care, and asking whether people might still be asked to choose a ‘package’ of core services, in order to retain sustainable models that will support other people now and in the future. The article then describes the Housing Associations' Charitable Trust's (hact's) Up2Us project, a key initiative to put supported housing service users centre stage in commissioning and purchasing care and support, in which Hanover and the London Borough of Barking and Dagenham are among the partners.

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Housing, Care and Support, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2020

Stephen Tsekea and Josiline Phiri Chigwada

The purpose of this study was to investigate the various innovative support strategies rendered by academic libraries in support of e-learning in Zimbabwean universities…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to investigate the various innovative support strategies rendered by academic libraries in support of e-learning in Zimbabwean universities. This was necessitated by the change in nature of learning and services provision in universities as a result of COVID-19. Despite the crisis caused by the pandemic, users of libraries still expect services to answer their information needs.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative study was done to unpack the role of digital library services in supporting e-learning in universities in Zimbabwe. An online questionnaire was developed using survey monkey and distributed to 50 professional librarians in both private and state universities in Zimbabwe. A total of 34 librarians responded to the questionnaire and the data was analysed and presented thematically. Data were presented using descriptive statistics in the form of figures.

Findings

The findings revealed that academic libraries play an important role in supporting e-learning in higher education institutions by providing electronic information resources, which are key in research, learning and teaching. The libraries provide a one-stop shop for accessing electronic resources through the digital library. Patrons have benefitted by accessing and using digital library services during the COVID-19 lockdown period. It was also discovered that libraries should ensure that they are prepared to always offer their services despite the closure of physical buildings because of the pandemic.

Research limitations/implications

The study used an online questionnaire only as the data collection instrument, as it was the most suitable one to get data from librarians working from home and also because of the COVID-19 health guidance such as maintaining social distance. The other methods were not used because of financial constraints.

Practical implications

This research showed the importance of digital services in e-learning environments, especially in developing countries. The work revealed how university librarians in Zimbabwe are coming up with practical solutions in supporting e-learning in times of crisis. The research therefore becomes handy for higher education institutions and authorities in crafting e-learning frameworks and positioning academic libraries at the centre of teaching, learning and research activities.

Social implications

This paper provides useful insights into how libraries can support learning especially during a pandemic. The paper details how libraries support communities by offering correct and reliable information from scholarly information sources. It also chronicles how libraries play an important part in the support of researchers in higher institutions in the fight against COVID-19.

Originality/value

To the best of authors’ knowledge, this research is one of the first done in Zimbabwe on strategies that libraries are using in the COVID-19 era to support e-learning. The findings presented in this study are helpful for higher and tertiary education authorities and other policymakers in improving e-learning and digital libraries.

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