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1 – 10 of over 4000
Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Eunju Suh, Matt Alhaery, Brett Abarbanel and Andrew McKenna

This study aims to examine Millennials and generational differences in online gambling activity by comparing online gambling behavior across four different generations

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine Millennials and generational differences in online gambling activity by comparing online gambling behavior across four different generations: Silent Generation, Baby Boomers, Gen Xers and Millennials.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample comprised tracked gambling data at the individual player level provided by an online casino accepting real money wagers in a major US gambling market. Attributes of gambling behavior were examined and compared across different generations using Kruskal–Wallis test and pairwise comparisons.

Findings

Generational differences were observed in 13 of the 16 behavioral variables. Millennials spent the least amount of time on gambling and exhibited the lowest scores on the number of days for slot gambling, trip length and trip frequency among all generations. However, their average table gaming volume per play day was greater than those of other generations.

Practical implications

The results of this study provide a better understanding of the generational differences in online gambling behavior. They also help casino operators and gaming machine manufacturers develop casino games and products that can appeal to different generational groups in the online gambling market.

Originality/value

Despite the on-going industry discussion about Millennials and their potential influence on the online gambling market, there appears to be a paucity of empirical research on the online gambling behavior of the Millennial generation. This study fills that gap in empirical evidence, addressing generational differences in online gambling.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Technology, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-9880

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 November 2008

Nicky Dries, Roland Pepermans and Evelien De Kerpel

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether four different generations (Silent Generation, Baby Boomers, Generation X, and Generation Y) hold different beliefs about…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether four different generations (Silent Generation, Baby Boomers, Generation X, and Generation Y) hold different beliefs about career. Career type, career success evaluation and importance attached to organizational security are to be scrutinized for each generation.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 750 people completed a vignette task, rating the career success of 32 fictitious people. Each vignette contained a different combination of five career features (functional level, salary, number of promotions, promotion speed, and satisfaction) at two levels (low and high). Furthermore, several items were added in order to determine each participant's career type and the extent to which they attached importance to organizational security.

Findings

The majority of participants still had rather “traditional” careers, although younger generations seemed to exhibit larger discrepancies between career preferences and actual career situation. Overall, satisfaction appeared to be the overriding criterion used to evaluate other people's career success. No significant differences were found between generations. With regard to importance attached to organizational security, the Silent Generation and Generation Y scored significantly higher than the other generations.

Research limitations/implications

The convenience sampling strategy led to large differences in sample size per generation. Using a vignette design limited the amount and richness of information that could be offered to participants. Perhaps other criteria relevant to real‐life career success evaluation should have been incorporated in this study.

Originality/value

The study raises questions about the validity of career success operationalizations frequently used in research. It is the first study to examine career success evaluation by means of vignettes.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 23 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 July 2008

Marguerite Moore and Jason M. Carpenter

This paper aims to examine differences in generational perceptions of market cues related to price, quality and shopping enjoyment in the apparel retailing context.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine differences in generational perceptions of market cues related to price, quality and shopping enjoyment in the apparel retailing context.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross‐section of US apparel consumers (n=342) constitutes the sample for the study. Analysis of variance and multiple comparisons are used to investigate differences in market cue perception among US generational cohorts.

Findings

Results indicate significant differences in the cohorts in terms of their perception of quality related to country‐of‐origin, price consciousness, prestige sensitivity and shopping enjoyment.

Research limitations/implications

The results should not be extrapolated to markets outside of the USA. Further, the sample characteristics should be considered for interpretation and application of the results for US markets.

Practical implications

The findings related to the market cues provide both operational and strategic direction for apparel marketers and retailers in terms of country‐of‐origin quality, pricing policy and managerial efforts to control the shopping experience.

Originality/value

The research expands upon the general research into US generational cohorts and consumer behavior by incorporating the entire social cycle within a single study: millennials, the thirteenth generation, the baby boomers and the silent generation.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 30 June 2016

Eddy S. Ng and Emma Parry

Interest in generational research has garnered a lot of attention, as the workplace is seeing multiple generations (i.e., the Silent Generation, Baby Boomers, Gen Xers…

Abstract

Interest in generational research has garnered a lot of attention, as the workplace is seeing multiple generations (i.e., the Silent Generation, Baby Boomers, Gen Xers, and Millennials) working side-by-side for the first time. However, it is unclear how multiple generations of workers interact with each other and affect the workplace. Although there is extant literature on generational differences, some scholars have argued that the effect sizes are small and the differences are not meaningful. The focal aim of this chapter is to present the current state of literature on generational research. We present the relevant conceptualizations and theoretical frameworks that establish generational research. We then review evidence from existing research studies to establish the areas of differences that may exist among the different generations. In our review, we identify the issues arising from generational differences that are relevant to human resource management (HRM) practices, including new workforce entrants, aging workers, the changing nature of work and organizations, and leadership development. We conclude with several directions for future research on modernizing workplace policies and practices, ensuring sustainability in current employment models, facilitating future empirical research, and integrating the effects of globalization in generational research.

Book part
Publication date: 30 September 2022

Ahmet Fidan

Our perception and analysis gradually grow and mature from subjectivity to objectivity as we investigate different periods of society and widen the temporal and spatial…

Abstract

Our perception and analysis gradually grow and mature from subjectivity to objectivity as we investigate different periods of society and widen the temporal and spatial framework. The egocentric viewpoint is responsible for some of humanity's greatest mistakes and social crises throughout history. Without perceiving the ‘other’ and considering individuals who are different from them, societies will not be able to create permanent solutions. Although the answers offered are appropriate for one's own civilisation, when looking at the problem from a global perspective, it is extremely likely that there will be a significant incompatibility with other nations and societies. In this context, while our study advises a method of approaching social arrangements regardless of location, particularly time period, it also provides analysis. So much so that today's analysis differs from yesterday's, and tomorrow's will differ even more from today's. Today, more than 80% of the population lives in cities, and this trend is expected to continue. We find that the perceptions of the demands of generations x, y, z and alpha, living today in the same time period, for public goods and/or services, and the value they place on them, are considerably different in the demographic segment, which continues to develop and grow.

Our study intends to explain, on a worldwide scale, how the value ascribed to events, objects and phenomena differentiate these perceptions through social observations and bilateral interviews with these people living simultaneously in an urban environment. Despite the fact that our research will define a geographical area as an urban area in terms of scope, it will also present examples of these urban areas from other countries throughout the world, putting the problem in a global context. Our sample comprises the major cities of the countries with the most people on each continent, whereas our study universe spans the entire globe. It is about observing the values given to these generations' perceptions of urban services in these capitals, ensuring that generations better understand each other based on these findings and reforming the production and presentation of urban goods and/or services based on these findings. Developed and emerging countries are the focus of our judgements and observations.

Book part
Publication date: 15 March 2021

Marcia Texler Segal and Vasilikie Demos

This introduction discusses the ways the idea of generation has been used in scholarship, for the general public, and in marketing to define and discuss social trends and…

Abstract

This introduction discusses the ways the idea of generation has been used in scholarship, for the general public, and in marketing to define and discuss social trends and understand behavior. The need to apply an intersectional lens to the concept is stressed. The eight chapters in the volume, each of which applies such a lens, are summarized. The particular relevance of gender and generation to the current Covid-19 pandemic is highlighted by the introduction and the chapters. Topics include transmission of and changes in gender attitudes and beliefs, generational differences in LGBTQ experiences, retirement and caregiving.

Details

Gender and Generations: Continuity and Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-033-7

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 December 2021

Braam Lowies, Graham Squires, Peter Rossini and Stanley McGreal

The purpose of this paper is to first explore whether Australia and the main metropolitan areas demonstrate significant differences in tenure and property type between…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to first explore whether Australia and the main metropolitan areas demonstrate significant differences in tenure and property type between generational groups. Second, whether the millennial generation is more likely to rent rather than own. Third, if such variation in tenure and property type by millennials is one of individual choice and lifestyle or the impact of housing market inefficiencies.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper employs a comparative research approach using secondary data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) to consider housing tenure and type distributions across generations as well as through cross-city analysis.

Findings

The results show that home ownership is still the dominant tenure in Australia, but private rental is of increasing significance, becoming the tenure of choice for Millennials. Owner occupation is shown to remain and high and stable levels for older generations and while lower in percentage terms for Generation X; this generation exhibits the highest growth rate for ownership. Significant differences are shown in tenure patterns across Australia.

Originality/value

The significance of this paper is the focus on the analysis of generational differences in housing tenure and type, initially for Australia and subsequently by major metropolitan areas over three inter-census periods (2006, 2011 and 2016). It enhances the understanding of how policies favouring ageing in place can contradict other policies on housing affordability with specific impact on Millennials as different generations are respectively unequally locked-out and locked-in to housing wealth.

Details

Property Management, vol. 40 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 February 2021

Tandy M. Ombogo and Ben W. Namande

The purpose of this study is to assess the influence of generations on information behavior and needs to access and use of library resources and how well academic…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to assess the influence of generations on information behavior and needs to access and use of library resources and how well academic libraries in Kenya are simultaneously serving both generations. From literature reviewed, a study on the Kenyan scenario on generational behavior and needs was not identified and this study sought to fill that gap.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collected were done through mixed-methods research using observation, structured interviews and questionnaires. The sample included 143 students and faculty within different generations, and three library staffs at The United States International University-Africa’s Library. Quantitative data were analyzed through SPSS and Excel, while qualitative data were analyzed according to the theme of this study. Likert-scale responses were used to measure information behavior of users’ needs and preferences.

Findings

Findings showed that the library is serving two distinct generations with different needs: out of a mean score of 5.00 of sample surveyed; digital immigrants need information resources mainly for research at an aggregate 3.93 while digital natives need information resources mainly for examinations at an aggregate 4.01. Both generations need to use technology to access and use information resources at 94% of digital immigrants and an aggregate 81.5% of digital natives surveyed. The library is training both user groups accordingly. This answered the research problem this study sought to assess.

Research limitations/implications

The generation of users was known only after administering the questionnaires. Consequently, the researcher targeted them using the status of respondents, faculty or student, to maximize sampling for each generation. Undergraduate and master’s students were used to target digital natives, while the faculty was used to target digital immigrants. PhD students were used to target both digital immigrants and digital natives. This study was done only in one location, USIU-Africa’s Library.

Originality/value

This study assessed how different generations within academic libraries in Kenya could be guided to effectively and efficiently adapt to global changes. This study assessed generational influence on needs and preferences in access and use of information resources, and assessed how academic libraries are concurrently and successfully serving variant user needs in Kenya,

Details

Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, vol. 70 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9342

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 30 September 2019

Christian Scholz

Europe currently displays a fascinating complexity. It experiences severe disruptions in the economic and educational systems, the labour markets and the political…

Abstract

Europe currently displays a fascinating complexity. It experiences severe disruptions in the economic and educational systems, the labour markets and the political orientation. Also, we see demographic issues with not enough young people on the one hand, and also not enough acceptable jobs on the other hand. All this raises questions regarding the consequences resulting from these dynamics for the young generation. This chapter deals in particular with the so-called ‘Generation Z’, which started – depending on the chosen author – between 1990 and 1995. In this analysis, the concept of ‘generation’ by Karl Mannheim plays an important role since it explains to us why and how cohorts of people are shaped in a specific period of time in a very similar way. When dealing with Generation Z, the following hypothesis of global convergence immediately comes up: since Generation Z is a digitally connected generation, it must move in the same direction. Even though this is partially true on the global scale, we see differences – even within Europe, since Europe is a heterogeneous space. Therefore, we cannot talk about ‘the European Generation Z’ but rather about the ‘Generations Z in Europe’ with their differences, their similarities and their dreams about their future. Besides arriving at the letter ‘Z’ in Generation Z by just continuing from X and Y to Z, the ‘Z’ provides us another interpretation: It stands for ‘zeitgeist’ and for a promising vision of Europe.

Article
Publication date: 13 September 2021

Jorge Arenas-Gaitán, Begoña Peral-Peral and Jesús Reina-Arroyo

There is a strong relationship between the changes that society faces and food. The aim of this work is to analyse the differences between generations related to their…

Abstract

Purpose

There is a strong relationship between the changes that society faces and food. The aim of this work is to analyse the differences between generations related to their behaviour towards food.

Design/methodology/approach

To characterise people's behaviour towards their food, the authors will use a tool, food-related lifestyles (FRL), which has been widely employed in the literature. To achieve this general objective, the authors are going to break this down into two operational goals. Firstly, the authors will analyse if there exist differences in generations regarding the characteristics which make up their FRL. Secondly, the authors will determine if there is an association between generations and specific FRL. The authors have developed a study of 1,200 consumers.

Findings

The results have enabled is to achieve the proposed aims and to describe the behaviour of each generation towards its FRL. There are significant differences in 15 of the 22 dimensions of the LRF analysed according to generations. The authors noted six consumer segments with regard to the FRL and the authors have found a relation between the characteristics which define the generations and their FRL. The findings enable offering implications for the food sector and for society.

Originality/value

Firstly, this research spans the five generations present in the current society. Secondly, most works are centred on how FRL correspond with the consumption of specific products. This paper is dedicated to going thoroughly into the intergenerational similarities and differences regarding their FRL. Thirdly, the FRL tool has been especially applied in the context of Central European and Nordic countries, the USA and South-East Asia. In this work, the authors apply the FRL to a Mediterranean cultural context, Spain, characterised by a Mediterranean diet and by a significant family and social component in the diet.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 124 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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