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Book part
Publication date: 19 April 2018

Lorayne Robertson

This chapter concerns itself primarily with questions of how students in higher education studies can best acquire, apply, create, and share knowledge. Over the past…

Abstract

This chapter concerns itself primarily with questions of how students in higher education studies can best acquire, apply, create, and share knowledge. Over the past several decades, multiple forms of active learning have been proposed in order to increase student engagement and deepen their understanding. This chapter, accordingly, examines the epistemological claims of the supporters and detractors of active learning while simultaneously exploring the nascence and development of some of the major understandings which presently underpin an epistemology of active learning. While the focus of earlier works may have been on changes that higher education instructors should make to improve student understanding of key STEM concepts, this chapter addresses changes in the roles of both students and instructors as the co-creators of active learning environments and learning communities. A particular focus is given to the significance of metacognition as a critical skill that enables students to assess their own learning and also critically assess sources of information. The chapter includes a framework which indicates trends toward high-impact active learning skills for students in STEM higher education and the research which theorizes and supports these new instructional imperatives.

Details

Active Learning Strategies in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-488-0

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 19 April 2018

Anastasia Misseyanni, Paraskevi Papadopoulou, Christina Marouli and Miltiadis D. Lytras

Active learning is not a simple practice. It is a new paradigm for the provision of high-quality, collaborative, engaging, and motivating education. Active learning has…

Abstract

Active learning is not a simple practice. It is a new paradigm for the provision of high-quality, collaborative, engaging, and motivating education. Active learning has the capacity to respond to most of the challenges that institutions of higher education are facing in our time. In this chapter, we present active learning strategies used in STEM disciplines and we analyze the potential of active learning to redefine the value proposition in academic institutions. After providing the theoretical underpinnings of active learning as an evolving practice, an attempt is made to connect it with different learning theories and present an integrative model in which institutional strategies, learning strategy and information, and communication technologies work synergistically toward the development of knowledge and skills. We then present the results of a survey examining “stories” of active learning from the STEM disciplines, identifying good teaching practices, and discussing challenges and lessons learned. The key idea is that active engagement and participation of students is based on faculty commitments and inspiration and mentoring by faculty. We finally present a stage model for the implementation of active learning practices in higher education. Emphasis is put on a new vision for higher education, based on systematic planning, implementation, and evaluation of active learning methods, collaboration, engagement with society and industry, innovation, and sustainability, for a better world for all.

Book part
Publication date: 29 August 2017

Alan I. Blankley, David Kerr and Casper E. Wiggins

The purpose of this study is to explore the learning and teaching techniques that accounting professors use in their courses to educate students. In this chapter, we…

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to explore the learning and teaching techniques that accounting professors use in their courses to educate students. In this chapter, we answer the following questions: (1) What methods are accounting faculty currently using in the classroom? (2) To what extent are active learning techniques being utilized relative to passive techniques? (3) What are the perceptions of accounting faculty regarding the use of active learning in the classroom?

To answer these questions, we conducted an Internet-based survey of accounting educators (n = 300). We found that, on average, passive learning methods (e.g., lectures) comprise approximately 50% of class time, active learning methods cover slightly more than 35% of class time, while assessment activities (e.g., exams) use about 15% of class time. Regarding faculty perceptions of the usefulness of various learning methods, we found that the faculty recommend the use of every learning method included in the survey at higher levels than are currently being used. Our findings provide a baseline profile of the current use of both passive and active learning methods in accounting and their perceived usefulness by accounting educators. This baseline should enable future research to track changes and trends in accounting pedagogy, particularly the learning and teaching techniques employed in the classroom.

Details

Advances in Accounting Education: Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-343-4

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 February 2021

Fernanda Gobbi de Boer Garbin, Carla Schwengber ten Caten and Diego Augusto de Jesus Pacheco

Although active learning methodologies are recognized as an effective means to achieve expected educational demands, in practice, the teaching and learning processes are…

Abstract

Purpose

Although active learning methodologies are recognized as an effective means to achieve expected educational demands, in practice, the teaching and learning processes are still widely characterized by traditional pedagogy aspects. As a result, teaching innovations in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education are carried out in isolation in specific disciplines, programs or departments. To addresses these challenges and to stimulate useful teaching innovations, this study aims to propose the capability maturity model to active learning (CMMAL) for assessing the maturity level of active learning methodologies in higher education institutions (HEIs).

Design/methodology/approach

The CMMAL provides inputs for planning and decision-making, identifying variables such as the current state of teaching and learning processes, project management, team development, allocation of resources and infrastructure and the choice of evaluation and assessment methods. From the relevant literature, the primary aspects that impact on active learning were identified and incorporated into the structure of the model. Next, a survey was performed with 295 STEM professors and experts validating the scope of the model proposed.

Findings

The findings demonstrated the contribution of the CMMAL mainly to (1) assess the maturity levels of active methodologies in higher education and (2) stimulate the institutionalization of active learning practices in HEIs to minimize some problems related to the dissemination of new teaching practices.

Practical implications

The primary practical and academic contribution of our study is the proposition of an artifact with a scope compatible with the need of the HEIs for the implementation of active learning methodologies. This paper presents a different perspective of current literature in active learning in STEM education, introducing a model that contributes to open the dialogue with HEIs interested in better understand and improve the performance in student-centered pedagogy.

Originality/value

The model also informs and leads to specific recommendations for HEIs seeking to enhance the performance of and alter the culture around active learning methodologies.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 September 2021

Marie Elaine Gioiosa and Katherine Kinkela

The purpose of this study is to propose an alternative approach to the think-pair-share active learning method and assess it for outcomes.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to propose an alternative approach to the think-pair-share active learning method and assess it for outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper evaluates student knowledge of the course content presented in the study (data analytics and artificial intelligence) using a pre- and post-test process with control (lecture-based) and test (active learning) groups. A mixed method approach was used. The quantitative portion included the test scores being analyzed statistically. The qualitative portion included analyzing the open-ended question on the post-test.

Findings

The results note that the active learning exercise improves student learning outcomes in a statistically significant manner (p < 0.001). The open-ended question on the post-test provides positive student feedback.

Originality/value

The active learning exercise used in this study offers an alternate approach to the “think” and “pair” portions of the think-pair-share method and determines whether learning outcomes are improved after implementation of the alternative method.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Zeina Daouk, Rima Bahous and Nahla Nola Bacha

The purpose of this paper is to determine students’ and instructors’ perceptions regarding the effectiveness of implementing active learning strategies in higher education…

1722

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine students’ and instructors’ perceptions regarding the effectiveness of implementing active learning strategies in higher education courses conducted at a tertiary institution in Lebanon.

Design/methodology/approach

Pre-service education students completed a questionnaire, professors were interviewed, and class sessions were observed.

Findings

Main findings indicate that the majority of the learners as well as the instructors favoured active learning and are strong proponents of putting into effect this approach in all their courses. These findings indicate the positive perceptions towards active learning strategies and the possible impact that these perceptions have on students’ performance and learning.

Research limitations/implications

Three major limitations have influenced the efficiency of this study. The number of participants is rather small. Only 37 education students were involved in this study. Furthermore, an additional limitation is that all the participants were females. Yet, it is worth noting that the majority of the students, who are majoring in education at that particular university, are females. Finally, it is worth mentioning that one of the researchers conducted the non-participant observations which might have influenced the data in one way or another.

Practical implications

Implications from the results of the study are far reaching. A major implication is for the programmes to reconsider the organization of the classrooms to have rooms that allows for cooperative and group work. Also, classroom organization should be student centred with the teacher’s place not necessarily at the front of the room but possibly at different places in the room or even sitting with the student for some of the assignments. A second implication is that the classroom is to be viewed as a learning situation where the teacher is a guide, a facilitator in the teaching/learning context which would be blended with the lecture method when needed. A further implication is that teacher professional development is a priority for the agenda of educational institutions to help promote teaching effectiveness of this clearly important active learning. After all, the students are doing the learning and the teachers need to guide them in this process.

Originality/value

The main value of this paper is to encourage university faculty members to change their teaching methods in order to engage and motivate learners.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Paul L. Hrycaj

The purpose of this paper is to determine the extent of the use of active learning in the online tutorials of members of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) and to…

1648

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the extent of the use of active learning in the online tutorials of members of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) and to compare these results with those found in a similar study done in 1999 by Nancy Dewald, and also to determine what major types of active learning these sites offer.

Design/methodology/approach

The focus of the study in this paper was on “stand‐alone” library skills tutorials, as opposed to those tutorials that need to be used in conjunction with an in‐person course in order to be effective. After defining what counts as a “tutorial” and “active learning”, ARL sites were reviewed to determine whether they employ elements of active learning.

Findings

This study found that the percentage of ARL tutorials that employ active learning is significantly greater than the percentage of such tutorials in Dewald's study. Also, some categories of the methods of active learning employed in these tutorials are determined and examples for each category are provided.

Research limitations/implications

Because web page content is fluid and open to frequent changes, the findings of this study may not be accurate by the time of publication.

Originality/value

This paper updates and expands on (by focusing on ARL members) the findings of Dewald's original study of online tutorials. Also, the categories of active learning discussed and the examples of these provided can offer some aid to libraries that wish to add to or expand the use of active learning in their online tutorials.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

John Burt

Students entering Zayed University are expected to become active participants in their learning. However, the majority of these students have come from a public education…

Abstract

Students entering Zayed University are expected to become active participants in their learning. However, the majority of these students have come from a public education system that is recognized to focus on teacher-centered passive learning. Students may be unprepared for this transition. This paper reports on a case study of changes in performance and motivation for students transitioning from passive learning to active learning.

Three students from the public education system were followed through two consecutive courses employing increasing active learning. Methods included observations, surveys, and interviews. Results indicate that the initial transition from passive learning to active learning has a negative impact, mainly due to inadequate preparation. However, subsequent development of skills through exposure results in improvement to the extent that motivation and performance exceed high school levels. It is concluded that the transition from active learning has the capacity to greatly improve student achievement if properly managed.

Details

Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: Gulf Perspectives, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2077-5504

Article
Publication date: 30 July 2018

Satoshi Sugahara and Steven Dellaportas

The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of an accounting education pedagogy incorporating active learning approaches designed to engage first-year…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of an accounting education pedagogy incorporating active learning approaches designed to engage first-year undergraduate business students and to aspire them to continue accounting as their academic major and entry into the accounting profession.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from a questionnaire with a pre-/post-test design of 24 undergraduate business students enrolled in a course titled Accounting Active Learning Seminar (AALS) (test group) and 33 students who did not participate in the AALS (control group). The AALS incorporates various types of active learning methods designed by the authors to inspire students to continue with accounting as a career choice.

Findings

The findings show that participation in the AALS improved student’s motivation in accounting education and the likelihood of choosing accounting as their academic major. The active learning methods implemented in the AALS were effective in improving students’ confidence, of which degree contributed to students’ stronger works aspiration towards accounting professions. Further it was found that students who did not participate in the AALS tended to have lower attention dimensions of motivation, which was also significantly associated with lower percentage of students’ choice of academic major in accounting.

Originality/value

This is one of the few studies to empirically examine active learning on student engagement and performance with a focus on accounting. While the evidence shows that active learning has pedagogical benefits, the full potential of active learning is more likely to be realized when accounting educators design active learning carefully to address the “attention” and “confidence” attributes.

Details

Meditari Accountancy Research, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-372X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 19 April 2018

Azril Bacal Roij

In the face of the erosion of democracy and the reemergence of authoritarian styles of rule and leadership in the contemporary world scene, the author reintroduces the…

Abstract

In the face of the erosion of democracy and the reemergence of authoritarian styles of rule and leadership in the contemporary world scene, the author reintroduces the anthropological and pedagogical insights of Dorothy Lee and Paulo Freire in the ongoing debate on active learning and higher education. In the case of Dorothy Lee, these insights refer to “valuing the self” of the student, and to the value of learning (values) from “remote cultures” and, last but not least, on the meaning of freedom and autonomy bounded by culture and structure in the teaching–learning process. In the case of Freire, the author selectively points to: (1) the value of community as a sociocultural anchor of identity, freedom, and autonomy, (2) the view of education as a tool for raising awareness, critical thinking, inspiration, hope, empowerment, cultural action, and social transformation, and (3) the view on citizenship education. The author discusses, in this regard, the significant role assigned by Dorothy Lee and Paulo Freire to the neglected notions of dialogue, freedom, culture, self, autonomy, and structure. Lastly, the author argues in favor of reincorporating the pedagogical insights of Dorothy Lee and Paulo Freire in the curricula and structure of higher education and also reminds those concerned with upholding democracy that these formative values and concepts were acknowledged in the early conception and development of active learning.

Details

Active Learning Strategies in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-488-0

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 4000