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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Chinaza Solomon Ironsi

There are currently no studies concerning the use of Google Hangout in North Cyprus. Thus, this study examines the perceptions of preservice teacher and language…

Abstract

Purpose

There are currently no studies concerning the use of Google Hangout in North Cyprus. Thus, this study examines the perceptions of preservice teacher and language instructors on the use of Google Meet (GM) as a synchronous language learning tool for a distant online program in Cyprus.

Design/methodology/approach

To elicit information on the perception of preservice teachers and language instructors on this issue, a quantitative research design was used for this study.

Findings

Though the language instructors deemed GM effective and efficient as a language learning tool, the preservice teachers thought otherwise.

Research limitations/implications

It was difficult to collect data during this pandemic outbreak. Obtaining ethical consent from the participants was difficult as well and so the sample size was small.

Practical implications

The study was able to demonstrate that the use of GM was somewhat effective as a language learning tool for the online distant program, though the level of efficiency and effectiveness varies from preservice teachers to the language instructors. Also, the study was able to highlight the use of GM could be very effective if it is well managed by the teachers to stimulate student engagement during lessons. The study showcased that the unavailability of Internet data, poor Internet connection are possible constraints to the efficiency of GM. Recently, a university in Northern Cyprus has decided to partner with a telecommunication network (Turkcell) toward providing free Internet access for all registered students within a particular period of learning. This is a welcomed approach that can be emulated by other educational facilities in bridging the gap created by poor Internet connection in a remote online learning setting.

Originality/value

There are no studies within the context of North Cyprus on the use of GM as a synchronous language learning tool for online distant programs. Though the use of GM is adjured effective and efficient, this contextual overview of GM is a new insight into academia.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2011

Carla Guevara and Scott Stewart

This research study seeks to identify what graduating students and alumni perceive to be of most value in courses, and in turn the relationship of those perceptions with…

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850

Abstract

Purpose

This research study seeks to identify what graduating students and alumni perceive to be of most value in courses, and in turn the relationship of those perceptions with the information in evaluations conducted by students at the conclusion of courses.

Design/methodology/approach

The project involves empirical research utilizing standard student course evaluation data, and rigorous matching alumni survey data. A focus group, as well as prior academic research, informs the design.

Findings

There are several key conclusions from this study comparing student and alumni perceptions of course satisfaction. Consistent with end‐of‐program survey and focus group observations, career relevance clearly grows with time in importance for determining course satisfaction. Career relevance is not a statistically significant factor for course satisfaction using end‐of‐course student survey responses, but grows to a statistically significant determinant utilizing alumni survey data, larger than both the extent of learning and instructor performance; moreover, instructor performance appears to become less important.

Research limitations/implications

While survey responses for individuals as both students and alumni cannot be linked in this study, the high response rate of alumni and the pooling of data suggest results are robust.

Practical implications

If instructors want students, once they become alumni, to be satisfied with their course experience, they need to teach material which will be truly useful in their careers, even if students do not fully appreciate it during class. And if university presidents want satisfied alumni, they need to ensure their school's curriculum includes material that may be applied in the real world, and that the measures of teaching effectiveness utilized for compensation purposes do not stress too highly traditional measures of student satisfaction.

Social implications

Educators can provide students with a more long‐term satisfying educational experience by ensuring curriculum includes practical material that is truly relevant for careers.

Originality/value

Student evaluations have been commonly used in determining the success of a course, and the effectiveness of their instructors. However, there has only been limited analysis of student evaluations as a measure of what matters most – the benefit to the student once they graduate and move into the working world. Empirical results based on student and alumni survey data identify differences in perceptions between students and alumni, and suggest key recommendations for both instructors and university administrators.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 37 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Himanshu Sharma and Sunil Prakash Pillai

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of the constructs – utilitarian, hedonic and social value on the perceptions of the full-time instructors related to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of the constructs – utilitarian, hedonic and social value on the perceptions of the full-time instructors related to their social media technology (SMT) management for learning and teaching practices at workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey is used to gather the data from 180 instructors (full time) working at one of the colleges owned by the ministry of manpower, Oman. This paper uses reliability analysis to determine Cronbach’s α and analysis of variance for the empirical investigation of instructorsperceptions on SMT management.

Findings

The analysis shows that 98 per cent of the instructors use SMTs at their workplace. Social influence is found more dominating than utilitarian and hedonic constructs in impacting on instructors’ intention for SMT use. Findings also claim that higher the use of SMT at workplace stronger the influence on learning and teaching practices of higher education instructors.

Practical implications

The findings of this study can be used as the recommendations for all the faculty members to use SMTs for their educational, learning and teaching practices. The administration can develop policies to motivate instructors to manage such technologies for professional and personal development to enhance learning and teaching environment at workplace.

Originality/value

This study is perhaps the leading attempt to use utilitarian, hedonic and social value perceptions of the instructors to investigate the management of SMTs in an academic culture and settings of the developing country in the Middle East (Oman).

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 23 May 2019

John Garger, Paul H. Jacques, Brian W. Gastle and Christine M. Connolly

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that common method variance, specifically single-source bias, threatens the validity of a university-created student assessment…

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1242

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that common method variance, specifically single-source bias, threatens the validity of a university-created student assessment of instructor instrument, suggesting that decisions made from these assessments are inherently flawed or skewed. Single-source bias leads to generalizations about assessments that might influence the ability of raters to separate multiple behaviors of an instructor.

Design/methodology/approach

Exploratory factor analysis, nested confirmatory factor analysis and within-and-between analysis are used to assess a university-developed, proprietary student assessment of instructor instrument to determine whether a hypothesized factor structure is identifiable. The instrument was developed over a three-year period by a university-mandated committee.

Findings

Findings suggest that common method variance, specifically single-source bias, resulted in the inability to identify hypothesized constructs statistically. Additional information is needed to identify valid instruments and an effective collection method for assessment.

Practical implications

Institutions are not guaranteed valid or useful instruments even if they invest significant time and resources to produce one. Without accurate instrumentation, there is insufficient information to assess constructs for teaching excellence. More valid measurement criteria can result from using multiple methods, altering collection times and educating students to distinguish multiple traits and behaviors of individual instructors more accurately.

Originality/value

This paper documents the three-year development of a university-wide student assessment of instructor instrument and carries development through to examining the psychometric properties and appropriateness of using this instrument to evaluate instructors.

Details

Higher Education Evaluation and Development, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-5789

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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2011

Sultan M. Al‐Daihani

The purpose of this paper is to explore students' perceptions and views of the instructors, in relation to information and communications technology (ICT) education in…

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2768

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore students' perceptions and views of the instructors, in relation to information and communications technology (ICT) education in library and information science (LIS) programs.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey was carried out among students from the two LIS departments in Kuwait. A focus group was conducted with faculty members of the two institutions, who provided qualitative input about the instruction of ICT, needed changes, and relevance of market needs.

Findings

Participants showed dissatisfaction with the currently available ICT courses in the LIS programs. Students pointed out deficiencies and inadequacies in ICT resources and facilities, and suggested upgrading software and hardware. They appeared to be satisfied with the ICT skills being targeted by LIS programs. They also appeared to be satisfied with the ICT instructors. The study pointed out a need for collaboration with professional forums for continuing education programs and the need for revisions in curricula to introduce more focused courses that meet the needs of the ever‐changing market requirements and give the students access to professional bilingual materials. The faculty members noted the demands of the job market and proposed measures for addressing them through enhanced course content and improved opportunities for hands‐on instruction.

Originality/value

Earlier studies reported in the literature have discussed ICT education in broader terms. This study reports the situation of ICT education in IS programs in Kuwait, focusing on specific areas such as resource, curricula, and instructors.

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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Zeina Daouk, Rima Bahous and Nahla Nola Bacha

The purpose of this paper is to determine students’ and instructorsperceptions regarding the effectiveness of implementing active learning strategies in higher education…

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1521

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine students’ and instructorsperceptions regarding the effectiveness of implementing active learning strategies in higher education courses conducted at a tertiary institution in Lebanon.

Design/methodology/approach

Pre-service education students completed a questionnaire, professors were interviewed, and class sessions were observed.

Findings

Main findings indicate that the majority of the learners as well as the instructors favoured active learning and are strong proponents of putting into effect this approach in all their courses. These findings indicate the positive perceptions towards active learning strategies and the possible impact that these perceptions have on students’ performance and learning.

Research limitations/implications

Three major limitations have influenced the efficiency of this study. The number of participants is rather small. Only 37 education students were involved in this study. Furthermore, an additional limitation is that all the participants were females. Yet, it is worth noting that the majority of the students, who are majoring in education at that particular university, are females. Finally, it is worth mentioning that one of the researchers conducted the non-participant observations which might have influenced the data in one way or another.

Practical implications

Implications from the results of the study are far reaching. A major implication is for the programmes to reconsider the organization of the classrooms to have rooms that allows for cooperative and group work. Also, classroom organization should be student centred with the teacher’s place not necessarily at the front of the room but possibly at different places in the room or even sitting with the student for some of the assignments. A second implication is that the classroom is to be viewed as a learning situation where the teacher is a guide, a facilitator in the teaching/learning context which would be blended with the lecture method when needed. A further implication is that teacher professional development is a priority for the agenda of educational institutions to help promote teaching effectiveness of this clearly important active learning. After all, the students are doing the learning and the teachers need to guide them in this process.

Originality/value

The main value of this paper is to encourage university faculty members to change their teaching methods in order to engage and motivate learners.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2014

Jacqueline Prowse

With the proliferation of international education initiatives, research into the transfer of pedagogy across cultures is essential to ensure that quality education is…

Abstract

With the proliferation of international education initiatives, research into the transfer of pedagogy across cultures is essential to ensure that quality education is delivered in a culturally accessible form. One of the factors impeding such research is the lack of widely accepted theoretical frameworks (Dimmock & Walker, 2005). This paper examines the development and effectiveness of a cross cultural framework that was used to compare a Business program at a Canadian College with its branch campus in Qatar (Prowse & Goddard, 2010). Findings are compared to results in the literature to gauge the robustness of the framework. The framework developed in the study was found to be a helpful means of allowing a comparison of pedagogy across two cultures.

Details

Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: Gulf Perspectives, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2077-5504

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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2016

Abdulaziz Alzeban

This paper aims to explore the challenges faced by accounting educators in their attempts to incorporate IFRS materials in their teaching and explores the impact of…

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2616

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the challenges faced by accounting educators in their attempts to incorporate IFRS materials in their teaching and explores the impact of various factors (instructor’s attitude, size of accounting department, teaching load, type of institution, teaching experience and teaching materials) on the time spent on teaching IFRS materials in undergraduate accounting programmes.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey was administered to faculty members working in Saudi Arabian universities, and interviews were held with a small number of such individuals in different universities in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

Findings

The results indicate that the instructor’s attitude and availability of IFRS materials exert the most influence upon the time spent by teachers on the IFRS. They further find that departmental support, familiarity with IFRS, training and teaching experience in IFRS are positively associated with the time spent on teaching the IFRS.

Originality/value

The important implication is that accounting educators must adapt their teaching practice in light of the increasing adoption of the global financial reporting standards.

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1993

Lee‐Allison Levene and Polly Frank

With so many academic librarians now employed in split or multi‐task job assignments, those who teach may question how they can develop the skills they need to be…

Abstract

With so many academic librarians now employed in split or multi‐task job assignments, those who teach may question how they can develop the skills they need to be challenging and innovative in the classroom. Instruction librarians may turn to their colleagues to help them cultivate their teaching skills, particularly during times when bibliographic instruction (B.I.) workshops or training sessions are not imminent. Noticing the informal coaching that exists among trusted colleagues, some libraries have given structure to this exchange through peer coaching programs.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 26 August 2020

Anna Stamatelatos and Robert Brooks

This study investigates simulated business learning and performance effectiveness during a simulation task. The learning and performance outcomes of two groups of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates simulated business learning and performance effectiveness during a simulation task. The learning and performance outcomes of two groups of postgraduate student participants are investigated namely: (a) participants who do not struggle with the task and (b) participants who do struggle with completing the task.

Design/methodology/approach

An experiment was conducted using a simulated business, which was manipulated into two initial commencement formats: positive initial format (PIF) and negative initial format (NIF). Individual performance on the task was measured via achievement of performance targets whilst individual learning was measured via causal cognitive maps.

Findings

Participants using PIF did not struggle with completing the task and achieved higher performance outcomes compared to participants using NIF, who struggled with completing the task. In addition, the positive association between learning and performance was significantly reduced for participants using NIF who struggled with completing the task

Research limitations/implications

This study’s findings are tentative as the sample size is small and several moderator/mediator variables, which may influence the findings (i.e. student learning style/instructor style/cognitive factors), are outside the scope of the study and thus not included.

Practical implications

Causal cognitive mapping results and students’ self-assessment of learning during simulated business debriefing, may further help instructors/students identify the differences in individual learning outcomes between those who have and have not struggled with increasing simulated business performance.

Originality/value

By using an experiment and causal cognitive mapping to measure individual learning, this study contributes further empirical evidence to the literature.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 62 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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